Fatal Houston PD Drug Raid Apparently Predicated On Drugs A Cop Had Stashed In His Car

from the this-is-insane dept

The ugly Houston PD drug raid that resulted in four injured officers and two dead "suspects" just keeps getting uglier.

Officers swore a confidential informant purchased heroin from 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle in the house he shared with his wife of 21 years, Rhogena Nicholas. They swore the CI told them the house was filled with heroin packaged for purchase.

On the strength of this confidential informant's claims, officers obtained a no-knock warrant and raided Tuttle's house. The officers claimed Tuttle opened fire on them and that his wife tried to grab a shotgun from a downed officer. This was the supposed reason for SWAT team's killing of Tuttle and Nicholas.

This was the narrative everyone was given. Not a single officer was wearing a body cam, despite the department possessing dozens of them. The only footage that survived -- captured by a neighbor's security camera -- was confiscated by the Houston PD.

Even in this vacuum of information, the PD's narrative quickly fell apart. No large amounts of heroin were found during the raid -- just personal use quantities of heroin cocaine and marijuana. The inventory also included a few guns, which the PD has treated as inherent evidence of criminality despite the fact both Tuttle and his wife could legally own the weapons found in the house. The only criminal history either of them had was an old misdemeanor charge for a bad check.

Now that the PD's investigation into this raid is underway, it's becoming clear the official narrative -- a daring no-knock raid that took out dangerous heroin dealers -- isn't going to survive. The new narrative already includes multiple lies by police officers and a lot of supporting evidence.

First off, the raid inventory does not include the weapon officers claimed Tuttle fired at them.

The other four items in the inventory are guns: a 20-gauge Beretta ALS shotgun, a 12-gauge Remington 1100 shotgun, a Remington 700 bolt-action rifle, and a .22-caliber Winchester 190 semi-automatic rifle. The list does not include the .357 Magnum revolver that police say Tuttle fired at the officers who broke into his home, shot his dog, and killed his wife.

It also doesn't include the money the CI paid for the heroin or the weapon he claimed Tuttle was carrying.

Nor does it mention the 9mm semi-automatic handgun that the C.I. supposedly saw in the house the day before, which apparently disappeared along with the heroin and the money.

The PD also claimed the investigation was initiated by an anonymous call claiming the couple were selling drugs from their house. Since that initial press salvo by Chief Art Acevedo, information has come out indicating the "tip" was neither anonymous nor did it reference drug dealing.

A 911 call from the mother of now-deceased suspect Rhogena Nicholas put 7815 Harding Street on police radar. Sources close to the investigation say her mother called reporting the 58-year-old was doing drugs inside her own home.

It only gets worse. According to statements from officers now under investigation, it appears the Houston PD raided a house, shot a dog, and killed two people over drugs a police officer had stashed in his vehicle. (As is pointed out in the comments, the current version of the Chronicle's article has reworded these two paragraphs slightly. Here's a link to an archived version containing this pull quote.)

In the original warrant - the one used to justify the raid - [Officer Gerald] Goines wrote that he watched the buy and, along with Bryant, identified the substance as heroin. But when investigators went back to talk to [Officer Steven] Bryant, he admitted that he'd actually just retrieved two bags of heroin from the center console of Goines' car, at the instruction of another officer.

Though he then took the two bags of drugs for testing to determine that they were heroin, he eventually admitted that he had never seen narcotics in question before retrieving them from the car. That, the investigator noted, contradicts the search warrant affidavit filed before the raid, which indicates that Bryant "recognized the substance purchased by the CI as heroin."

This is absolutely terrifying. Investigators can't seem to locate the informant both officers claimed was a reliable source of intel, which suggests this person -- relied on in other Houston PD investigations -- doesn't even exist. None of the CIs interviewed by Houston investigators said they'd made the purchase detailed in the warrant affidavit.

How do citizens protect themselves against police officers willing to fabricate every aspect of an investigation in order to perform armed raids of their houses? Legally owning weapons means nothing when cops (and many courts) consider homeowners defending themselves from armed intruders a crime in and of itself. Two people are dead and no amount of late-arriving indictments is going to change that. Officers took a concerned mother's call about her daughter's drug use and turned it into a criminal conspiracy involving heroin and dangerous drug pushers armed to the teeth.

We have to grant law enforcement a massive amount of power in order for them to do their job. Time after time, they abuse the powers we've given them, wielding them like weapons against the same citizens they're supposed to answer to. Vast power has been paired with nearly nonexistent accountability to create an atmosphere where officers feel comfortable manufacturing evidence to support their adrenaline habits. This should be nightmare fuel for all Americans. Unfortunately, outside of those already attuned to the miserable state of American policing, this will appear to be nothing more than a couple of bad apples they can safely ignore.

Filed Under: dennis tuttle, gerald goines, heroin, houston, houston pd, no knock warrant, police, rhogena nicholas, steven bryant, swat team


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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 3:35pm

    Houston already said it's no longer doing no-knock warrants.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 3:58pm

      Re:

      This should have been a no brainer after the first time they entered the wrong house and had an officer killed by a legally owned weapon, in defense of their own home. Every no-knock entry is a recipe for disaster. Not bothering to record your no-knock entry in this day and age is negligent, to say the least. Based on all of the lies turned up so far, these cops need to be charged with murder.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 9:20pm

        Re: Re:

        to be honest, were I on a jury in such a case, I would find failure to wear and operate a body camera, when the department owns and uses them, to be proof of intent to defraud. Same for after-action failures of said devices.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 9:57pm

      Re:

      Nope. The police chief said he was going to restrict approval of no-knocks to his office.

      Which really means - they'll be slightly restricted for a couple weeks in the hopes that this will fall out of the news cycle. Once its clear that Acevedo isn't going to get fired it will be back to business as usual.

      Let's face it - this doesn't just happen. This is the end result of a long pattern of misbehavior and corner cutting that has been deliberately overlooked by their seniors. Nobody walks in on their first day and makes up informants and gets other cops to lie on warrant applications for them.

      This has been - and was - totally acceptable to the senior cops, the prosecutors office, and the elected city personnel. Nobody had a problem kicking down the doors of 'some druggies' before.

      Now that 4 cops got themselves shot, two people murdered, and nothing to show for it - now they're covering their arses.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 4:01pm

    No heroin at all found

    No large amounts of heroin were found during the raid -- just personal use quantities of heroin and marijuana.

    Perhaps you mis-wrote?

    Your linked Houston ABC 13 article states:

    According to the court documents, police recovered four guns, about 18 grams of marijuana and about 1.5 grams of cocaine.

    This is consistent with the Houston Chronicle reporting:

    … only 18 grams of marijuana and 1.5 grams of white powder, according to the results of a search warrant released Friday.

    … a gun battle that ended with the deaths of Navy veteran Dennis Tuttle, his wife Rhogena Nicholas and their dog — but failed to turn up any heroin.

    (Emphasis.)

    “Personal use” amounts of marijuana and cocaine. No heroin at all.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Capitalist Lion Tamer (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 12:05pm

      Re: No heroin at all found

      I did mis-write. Thanks for clearing that up.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 1:12pm

        Blockquote [was Re: Re: No heroin at all found]

        Btw, did you also notice that you're pulling two paragraphs of blockquote from an earlier version of that Houston Chronicle story? An earlier version than the one they've got posted now.

        I'm finding your blockquoted material in the version headlined “Affidavit: Police can't find informant used to justify deadly Pecan Park drug raid”, which is marked “Updated 2:21 pm CST, Friday, February 15, 2019.”

        But your current associated hyperlink up there in the article is now pointing at a version headlined “HPD Chief Acevedo says narcotics cop committed likely crime by lying in affidavit for deadly raid”, which is marked “Updated 9:14 pm CST, Friday, February 15, 2019”. And the current version that your article points at doesn't have your two blockquoted paragraphs in it. Or at least not exactly as you've got them blockquoted. The Houston Chronicle revised their story at that url.

        This has caused a slight bit of confusion.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • icon
          Capitalist Lion Tamer (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 2:49pm

          Re: Blockquote [was Re: Re: No heroin at all found]

          I'll update the pull quote. I see the Chronicle hasn't bothered to inform readers the article has been updated.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    ECA (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 4:05pm

    Love he idea..

    That rushing into a house because they are afraid...That someone will get rid of the evidence... HOW ABOUT, SHUT OFF THE WATER.. 1 flush isnt enough for a major Drug capture. And if you place a Bucket in the sewer to capture anything floating down.... WOW, how safe can you be??

    REALLY want safe? Gas the house..there are allot of things that can put persons to sleep.. and it ISNT to hard..

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    • identicon
      Agammamon, 19 Feb 2019 @ 10:02pm

      Re: Love he idea..

      if you place a Bucket in the sewer to capture anything floating down

      Couple things here. In most single-family homes in America, the water shut off is in the front yard, near the curb. Its impossible to shut it off without someone seeing you do it.

      And you can't put a bucket in the sewer - you're not going to get close to the houses since those are 4ft or smaller diameter pipes, sealed, with basically poisonous atmospheres. Its not like in games and movies where people can wander around in them. Not in residential areas. You might have room to stand in a storm sewer - but those aren't connected to homes, only drain water from the street.

      But other than that, yeah - if there's so little a person could flush it in a couple minutes, there's isn't enough there to be worth knocking the door off the hinges for.

      The stuff shouldn't be illegal in the first place but the sheer rage police bring to bear against minor possessors is insane. Its like they HATE us for not obeying. Like they take it personally.

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      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 12:09am

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        the sheer rage police bring to bear against minor possessors is insane

        Not really surprising when you consider that they've been treating civilians as punching bags. Wasn't there a recent Techdirt article where some chief flat out said that anyone who disagreed with gunning down unarmed citizens could be expected to not receive protection?

        Add that you have a bunch of goons who are a combination of being scared shitless if someone so much as glances in their general direction, and are trigger-happy to the point of going for their firearms to "solve" any scenario - and you've got a tragedy in the making.

        You might be wondering why not focus that rage at actual traffickers. "What are you, nuts?" the police would say. "Don't you want us to have our right to go home safe?"

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Bruce C., 20 Feb 2019 @ 5:09am

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        That actually varies a lot. They might lose time trying to shut off the water.

        Plus, flushing stuff down the toilet doesn't really work for big packs of drugs anyway. The whole concept of no-knock warrants is archaic.

        There's a fundamental conflict between the stand your ground/castle doctrine laws and no-knock warrants that needs to be addressed before more people die.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 11:14am

          Re: Re: Re: Love he idea..

          The whole concept of no-knock warrants is archaic.

          Funnily enough - its actually the opposite.

          The reason warrants were created was specifically to set up conditions where a law enforcement agent wouldn't be in a position to need to kick down a door. It was to limit their power to the level that when they showed up with that piece of paper it could defuse the situation and get the homeowner calm enough to engage with the process (rather than trying to violently repel an intruder), calmed by the idea that this was all impartial, nobody was out to get them, and they would get a fair hearing.

          No knocks are actually a fairly recent invention. Or, at least their use has become extremely prevalent over the last generation - due 100% to the War on Drugs.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        bhull242 (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 10:42am

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        If they don’t notice the armed officers gathering around their front door, they aren’t going to notice them shutting off the water first.

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      • icon
        ECA (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 2:47pm

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        Ever wonder HOW someone can flush 1kg of pot down a toilet?? 2.2 pounds.. A coffee can, PACKED TIGHT.. ANd yes, a 3' round pipe is big enough for 1 human...and watching all that drugs come down the line??? will need aLLOT of water... So turn the water back on and Flush the line, INCASE it got stuck..

        Or just shoot the people and TRY to find the drugs after...SOP

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        ECA (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 4:48pm

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        sewer lines in many older areas are in alleys..where they can Dig with few problems.. As to the bucket..You just need to know what line its in..TRY dumping 2+ pounds of dry material DOWN a sewer..NEEDS LOTS OF WATER... good chance hundreds of gallons.. YA, go work on sewer lines and tell me how much you know.. Ever remove a toilet because Tampon got stuck?? Ever see what happens when people dump Grease down the lines?? IT STICKS ALL THE WAY DOWN.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      David, 20 Feb 2019 @ 12:16am

      Re: Love he idea..

      REALLY want safe? Gas the house..there are allot of things that can put persons to sleep.. and it ISNT to hard..

      To work by "gassing the house", you need something that works across concentrations of more than 1:1000 or more. With that kind of range, there is not much you can aim for except lethality and you'll likely get some of the surroundings as well.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Agammamon, 20 Feb 2019 @ 11:16am

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        As far as the cops are concerned - we're all criminal scum anyway. Save them some effort if some of the occupants succumb.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        ECA (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 2:42pm

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        so persons in a home at 6am sleeping, and alittle extra gas is going to kill them...better then shooting them while awake, isnt it??

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          Agammamon, 20 Feb 2019 @ 2:48pm

          Re: Re: Re: Love he idea..

          Yes, a little extra gas will kill them. Like it did for the Russians.

          At least the Russians had the excuse that they were trying to end a hostage situation - you're saying use it for investigative warrants when the cops don't even know if a crime's been committed yet.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          • icon
            ECA (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 4:50pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re: Love he idea..

            Or they BASH a door in, at 6am, and scare the Spit out of them, Cops not knowing HOW many people are inside,BECAUSE they didnt even peek thru a windows.. Then RUSH in as a group, making a HUGE target for anyone shooting back.. Even the military has this strange rule about waking a sleeping person...in the first few seconds...they can do anything..

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 21 Feb 2019 @ 2:13pm

              'Fight fire with fire?' nothing bad could possibly happen...

              Hey, lets use our sleeping agent (fentanyl derivative) on the suspected heroin dealers...Lol, I mean the whole thing is predicated on finding substances in the residence that test positive for Opioid's...Not to mention the overall goal of REDUCING the number of Opiod-overdose related deaths. (That is still a goal right?).

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 6:10am

      Re: Love he idea..

      'REALLY want safe? Gas the house..there are allot of things that can put persons to sleep.. and it ISNT to hard..'

      Yeah... the Russians tried something like that a while back in 02. Didn't work out so well for a number of hostages.

      Considering police seem to have problems doing even basic due diligence to make sure their flash bangs won't injure an infant I wouldn't trust them with anesthetic gas.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        PaulT (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 6:22am

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        "Considering police seem to have problems doing even basic due diligence to make sure their flash bangs won't injure an infant"

        They seem to have problems doing enough due diligence to ensure they have the right house!

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        ECA (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 4:39pm

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        Love it.. Diligence.. The ability to figure out how many persons are IN the house, before you enter it.. Would be nice to know...are they asleep, or awake partying.. What would it take to OPEN a door without it WAKING PEOPLE, then screaming POLICE, we are coming in..

        See, there is a strange logic for Small drug business...Its called NO GUNS and we wont be in prison for 20 years on gun charges...

        Also, if 1-2 officers ENTER, insted of 20+ it makes for Fewer targets... These guys are working like a Video game, RUSH THEM FAST AND GET SHOT FIRST..

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      JMT (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 1:23pm

      Re: Love he idea..

      I think it's safe to say you don't know how sewer systems work and you've watched too many movies featuring 'knock-out' gas.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        ECA (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 2:49pm

        Re: Re: Love he idea..

        1 they should already BE ASLEEP.. Adding alittle extra to the air would keep them asleep..and if you dindt SMASH the door and wake them up;...would help also..

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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 4:36pm

    Most likely the heroin found in the car by one officer was planted by another officer.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Bamboo Harvester (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 4:37pm

    Spot the truth in the narrative...

    ..."No money was found"...

    Is there ever?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      george tuttlestein, 20 Feb 2019 @ 10:30am

      Re: Spot the truth in the narrative...

      There was no money found because it was a reverse. The alleged CI was probably a doper working off an HPD "contract" thus- no records. The contractor just picked someone he knew, who he sold to before, and set him up. Charge the guy working off the "contract" with murder. The affidavit in support of the warrant was proof read and corrected by the officers Sgt. the officers Lt. the officers Captain, and the DA, before going to the judge for signature. So don't hang only the lowrst ranking officer in the error chain. The chief had to ok the "fake news useful idiot" presence, and the news wonks asked no questions, and actively tried to cover up the snafu! All law enforcement up the error chain of command need to be charged with conspiracy to commit murder.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Agammamon, 20 Feb 2019 @ 11:17am

        Re: Re: Spot the truth in the narrative...

        There . . . there is no 'guy'. There is no CI. He was made up. A fake. A faux-parrot.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    That One Guy (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 5:15pm

    That uh, seems like an important detail there

    But when investigators went back to talk to [Officer Steven] Bryant, he admitted that he'd actually just retrieved two bags of heroin from the center console of Goines' car, at the instruction of another officer.

    Bad enough that two murders apparently were justified on nothing but lies and trigger-happy killers, but this little line rather stuck out for me. If the CI doesn't exist, as seems to be the case, why did a cop have two bags of heroin in their car? Because the two possible reasons I can think of offhand(personal use and planting them) are both pretty damning, and given the two corpses left in their wake I'm not exactly inclined to give them the benefit of the doubt here.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 5:28pm

      Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

      why did a cop have two bags of heroin in their car?

      The search warrant affidavit for Officer Steven Bryant's model A1549 celluar device mentions “two bags of heroin” in two different contexts, with both mentions on p.3 of the PDF:

      • Para 6: CI#2 Napoleon Street purchase “two bags of heroin”
      • Para 9: Center console of Goine's city-issued vehicle “two bags of heroin”

      There is no indication that I see that these two paragraphs refer to the same “two bags of heroin”.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        That One Guy (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 6:00pm

        Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

        Problem with that is it rather hinges upon that heroin coming from a CI, which appears not to have been the case, hence the question of 'why did a cop have heroin in their car?'

        Though he then took the two bags of drugs for testing to determine that they were heroin, he eventually admitted that he had never seen narcotics in question before retrieving them from the car. That, the investigator noted, contradicts the search warrant affidavit filed before the raid, which indicates that Bryant "recognized the substance purchased by the CI as heroin."

        In the warrant request they claimed that they got the heroin from a CI. Upon being further questioned they admitted that they'd never seen the drugs before taking them from another cop's car. One of those was clearly a lie, because both cannot be true at the same time, and given the details covered in this story and the previous one it's almost certainly the 'got it from a CI' claim.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 6:12pm

          Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

          In the warrant request…

          Stop.

          You're aware that there are at least three search warrants relevant here?
          1) The Harding Street raid warrant.
          2) Bryant cellular device warrant.
          3) Goines cellular device warrant.
          Each of the three warrants has an associated application, affidavit, warrant, execution, and return.

          Be specific about which warrant you're talking about. I can't tell when you just say “the warrant”. The?

          I think you're slightly confused right now, because you started “ Problem with that…”. Have you read the Bryant cellular device warrant affidavit? I've linked it twice now in comments, once just above in replying to you, and gave you specific paragraphs.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          • icon
            That One Guy (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 6:48am

            Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

            Three warrants? Yeah, I can see how this would be confusing. To be clear, 'the warrant' I was talking about was the original warrant that lead to two bodies, the Harding street raid one,and reading it through it looks like confusion is something both of us are facing, as the warrant you linked talks about the drugs in question being found after the fact(I think, no timeline makes for a confusing read), though still in a cop's car.

            Reading through the one you linked though, I think I might have found out where the drugs in question came from. Page 3, about half-way down talks about how an informant(CI#2) that does actually exist went and bought drugs at the behest of Goines, despite the fact that unlike what was outlined in the Harding Street warrant Goines wasn't there before the purchase, wasn't there after, and only picked up the drugs six hours afterwards. The fact that those drugs were still in his car though, rather than being taken immediately to be locked up as evidence/tested to be sure it was heroin, leads right back to the question of 'Why did a cop have heroin in their car at that point, especially given the extremely dodgy explanation for how they apparently got it?'

            While it's certainly possible that they forgot about two bags of heroin(I mean, it's not like something like that is important or anything), how they got the drugs and that they are apparently more than willing to lie on a warrant request leaves me in a position such that my default position is to assume the worst, no benefit of the doubt granted.

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 7:08am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail ther

              Three warrants?

              At least three. Three that I've seen myself.

              The Officer Gerald Goines model A1549 cellular device warrant, affidavit and return is largely duplicative of the “Officer Steven Bryant model A1549 cellular device warrant, affidavit and return”, so for simplicity here, I had just been linking to the Bryant one. And the Bryant one also appears to be the one that's directly referenced in the Houston Chronicle story that Cushing linked above. Although the Chronicle itself doesn't link to the actual documents which I got from a KPRC2 / Click2Houston story (snapshot).

              The comment attached to the earlier Techdirt story perhaps lays the document sourcing out more clearly, if tersely.

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 7:30am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail ther

              confusion is something both of us are facing

              I certainly got a little side-tracked on the sourcing of Cushing's blockquotes in the article above. I just expected to find those quotes in the Houston Chronicle story that Cushing linked above, immediately before the two paragraphs he blockquoted. And so then, when searching on a part of the sentence immediately got a hit inside the Chronicle story… well, I saw the positive result I expected to see… and so wrote my second reply to you — before I caught the mismatch.

              So then I spent time tracking down and documenting a plausible reason for the blockquote discrepancy in the story here.

              Anyhow, that's all side-tracking. But there's absolutely, certainly, 100% a bit of confusion there, and some of it's my fault. Sorry.

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 7:40am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail ther

              Page 3, about half-way down talks about how an informant(CI#2) that does actually exist went and bought drugs at the behest of Goines

              Yeah. That's what I was referring to, when I wrote earlier

              Para 6: CI#2 Napoleon Street purchase “two bags of heroin”

              So, that's para 6 on p.3 in the PDF.

              But why do we think that the “two bags of heroin” in para 6 on p.3 are the same “two bags of heroin” in para 9 on p.3 ? Just because both para 6 and para 9 are on the same page 3 in the affidavit? Just because Goines is involved with both para 6 and para 9 ?

              I'm not seeing Officer R. Bass directly asserting that the para 6 “two bags” are the same as the “para 9” two bags. I don't see that directly asserted.

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

              • icon
                That One Guy (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 8:02am

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail

                Ah, I see what you're getting at now, and that is a good point. CI#2 is a possible source for the drugs in question, but without a solid link there's no way to be sure.

                reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

                • identicon
                  Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 8:15am

                  Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important det

                  CI#2 is a possible source for the drugs in question, but without a solid link there's no way to be sure.

                  Exactly. Or close enough for government work. I would have used the word “plausible”, but the word “possible” fits.

                  reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 7:43am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail ther

              my default position is to assume the worst

              Fwiw, when I'm reading a warrant affidavit, I'm approaching it in common-sense fashion, neither hyper-critical nor hyper-technical.

              reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 6:51pm

          Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

          Though he then took the two bags of drugs . . . . Bryant "recognized the substance purchased by the CI as heroin."

          Let me put this another way.

          Did you read the Houston Chronicle story that Cushing linked above, where the part you quoted comes from?

          Did you see in that same Chronicle story—

          The critical allegations were outlined in a sworn affidavit written by HPD Officer R. Bass, with the department's Special Investigations Unit, who asked a judge for a search warrant to examine the cell phone of officer Steven Bryant, an undercover narcotics officer relieved of duty after the shooting.

          (Emphasis.)

          And the further down in the Chronicle story, two paragraphs above the paragraph where your quote comes from—

           . . . according to Bass' affidavit.

          [paragraph]

          Bryant . . . . Though he then took the two bags of drugs . . . . Bryant "recognized the substance purchased by the CI as heroin."

          —and that para ends with the part you quoted. So the info that you're quoting from the Chronicle story comes from HPD Officer R. Bass' affidavit.

          So, now, when you look at the actual warrant affidavit for Officer Steven Bryant's model A1549 cellular device, at the very beginning of that affidavit (p.2 in PDF), do you see—

          I, R. Bass, a peace officer . . .

          (Emphasis.)

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          • identicon
            Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 7:44pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

            Though he then took the two bags of drugs . . . . Bryant "recognized the substance purchased by the CI as heroin."

            Hmmmm… That's actually not what the Chronicle story appears to say right now.

            Instead, a snapshot of the Chronicle story shows—

            Though he took the two bags of drugs for testing to determine that they were heroin, Bryant eventually said he had never seen the narcotics in question before retrieving them from the car.

            So the initial sentence is almost the same as what Cushing has—

            Though he then took the two bags of drugs for testing to determine that they were heroin

            But then it ends differently.

            So where did Cushing's blockquote come from then? It looked to me like it came from the hyperlink he had provided right above his blockquoted material.

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        Coyne Tibbets (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 7:50pm

        Re: Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

        And even more important detail is that, if I can read a map correctly, Napoleon Street is nowhere near Harding Street.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 9:12pm

      Re: That uh, seems like an important detail there

      While you mentioned 2 possible reasons for the heroin in the car (personal use & planting them), i don't think you considered a whole different narrative to the story...

      (a bit off point but you should see the connection) About 20yrs ago (in Australia), i knew some people who were dealing pot, and were raided by Police after an (apparent) CI told the cops they were dealing meth; Obviously no meth was found, but pot was... but for some reason the cops then took 2 years to actually file charges against them. And when the cops filed charges... meth was listed as being found at the premises. Jump forward another 9 months and we learn - there was no CI, the cops had word they were dealing, but didn't know what they were dealing. The cops claimed it was meth, as the cops were actually dealing meth & were looking for more stock (to sell). When the cops actually laid charges, they used some of their own stock (which they added into evidence) - as a way to justify the raid in the first place. Oh, and by this time (almost 3yrs later), the pot which was seized from the raid had disappeared from evidence (as the same meth dealing cops were now also dealing pot - and had used the seized pot from the raid to create their first levels of stock).

      In the end, the case against the people dealing was thrown out of court - as the entire thing was tainted, all the evidence had disappeared, and the cops which initiated the raid had been busted & went to court & were sentenced to prison.


      And thus the possible narative... there was no CI, and the cops had heroin in the car cause they were dealing - and the raid was purely about re-stocking for the cops & taking down the (perceived) competition.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    JoeCool (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 5:32pm

    How? Maybe like this

    How do citizens protect themselves against police officers willing to fabricate every aspect of an investigation in order to perform armed raids of their houses?

    Cameras everywhere that upload constantly to an off-scene server. The homeowners have a panic button as well as a secret code that must be input every day or the videos are uploaded to several sites on the net. Then plenty of signs warning officers that every move they make on the property is being recorded and that they cannot access said recordings from the property.

    Sad that it's come down to sacrificing our privacy to ensure safety from those who are supposed to be protecting us.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Rog S., 21 Feb 2019 @ 11:35pm

      Re: How? Maybe like this

      Monitoring poluce corruption via security cameras is an incredibly time intensive task.

      I was once a community activist, and had Muslim and atheists alliances, and anti-police brutality related events, and I had security cameras on my property. I literally eas the guy who "watches the watchers. ”

      The cameras were routinely destroyed, and frequently knocked offline by “mystery ” hackers, and monitoring these activities was a real and literal eye opener.

      It happened to my Pakistani neighbor too, and he was a computer IT guy.

      Then, this absurd activity was frequently followed by phone calls from the police and firemans unions/organizations seeking contributions. So bizarre, its imposdible to make up.

      Police have weaponized "community policing "exclusively for their own interests, and have foisted the see something / call a cop model upon us with these tactics.

      You get the police you pay for, I guess. And, the fascist pseudo -democracy you deserve.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Anonymous Anonymous Coward (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 5:33pm

    To what end?

    The thing that bothers me, outside of sociopaths excising their predilection to assert authority over others, is what do the cops get out of such actions?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      That One Guy (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 5:51pm

      Much more exciting that way

      Getting to play real life 'Cops and Robbers', with real guns this time.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Igualmente69 (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 9:40am

      Re: To what end?

      Money. Where do you think the heroin came from. The cops obviously were either selling drugs themselves, planting drugs for forfeiture case, or both. They just got exposed because the homeowners exercised their rights to self-defense. If there wasn't any resistance, there would have been no story, just another case of drug-related asset forfeiture.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 10:15am

        Re: Re: To what end?

        The other four items in the inventory are guns: a 20-gauge Beretta ALS shotgun, a 12-gauge Remington 1100 shotgun, a Remington 700 bolt-action rifle, and a .22-caliber Winchester 190 semi-automatic rifle. The list does not include the .357 Magnum revolver that police say Tuttle fired at the officers who broke into his home, shot his dog, and killed his wife.

        It is beginning to look more like the police got in the way of their own bullets, and outright executed the victims.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 19 Feb 2019 @ 6:14pm

    Houston, we have a problem!

    So. Much. Fail.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Killercool (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 6:47pm

    Ah, for the naive, sweet younger days of last week...

    Last week, the worst ideas about the whole shitshow (with any sort of basis in reality) were that they had mistakenly raided 7815 Harding Street, a quiet and nondescript house, instead of 7815 Hardy, a house that definitely looks the part they claimed of the raided place: seedy, decent quality camera system, shady folks hanging around, etc.

    To think it would devolve into a whole conspiracy of lies, planted evidence and invented witness statements. I truly did not expect this.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    That Anonymous Coward (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 9:15pm

    See, we've been warning you.... Calling 911 looking for help ends up with people dead.

    I also enjoy the Chief trying to spin the story that the neighbors were all happy these people were dead now b/c they were bad.

    Perhaps it is time we stop buying the few bad apples bullshit & admit we've put more importance on the appearance of them being the good guys over the simple fact some of them are bad guys. We need serious reform & punishments.

    Lie about a drug buy. Lie on the stand. Lie about weapons.

    All of these things we've caught cops doing, and somehow they have the 'right' to hide bad acts by the cops but can read the entirely litany of 'crimes' suspects have ever even thought about committing...

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Anton Sherwood (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 5:50pm

      the neighbors

      I also enjoy the Chief trying to spin the story that the neighbors were all happy these people were dead now b/c they were bad.

      And then when he was called on that, pivoting to “That's what the neighbors always say, they had no idea he was a serial killer, yada yada.”

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Agammamon, 19 Feb 2019 @ 9:53pm

    Frankly, this whole thing is starting to sound like all these cops were in a gang together and fabricated everything as an excuse to rob the place.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Seegras (profile), 19 Feb 2019 @ 11:16pm

    Receipt

    I hope the police department sent the surviving family members a receipt for the processing of the deceased B^HTuttle https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil_(1985_film)

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      PaulT (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 1:23am

      Re: Receipt

      That was exactly my first thought! I was going to comment straight after reading the surname in the keywords, but was disappointed to find that it was the guy's action name rather than a subtle movie reference.

      Once again to those in charge - 1984 and Brazil are meant to be cautionary tales & satires, not how-to manuals.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Richard M (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 6:24am

    Thanks Mom...

    "A 911 call from the mother of now-deceased suspect Rhogena Nicholas put 7815 Harding Street on police radar. Sources close to the investigation say her mother called reporting the 58-year-old was doing drugs inside her own home."

    So the mom of a 58 year old adult women called the cops on her own daughter? WTF is up with that??

    What did she think was going to happen? Rainbows and unicorns?

    Cops are basically the largest most successful criminal organization in the country and calling them on anyone especially family members very rarely ends well.

    You know she has to be feeling very bad right now since she basically got her daughter killed but I honestly am finding it hard to feel much sympathy for her.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2019 @ 6:35am

      Re: Thanks Mom...

      “Sources close to the investigation say…”

      Well, if “sources close to the investigation say”, then you just know it's gotta be absolute gospel truth.

      Especially in this here investigation. Where HPD is not releasing the recording of the alleged 911 call. Despite media requests for the audio tape of the call.

      But “sources close to the investigation say…”

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      That One Guy (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 9:09am

      Re: Thanks Mom...

      'Only call the cops if your day isn't bad enough already.'

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      eljefe3126 (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 9:02pm

      Re: Thanks Mom...

      It gets worse. Nocholas was a cancer patient who used marijuana to relieve her symptoms. Houston News Now tracked down her dealer, who admitted to selling her weed. However, he said he never sold her any cocaine, and would be very surprised to find that either she or her husband was using any.

      Of course, it IS possible that they bought the coke from another dealer.

      Unfortunately, given all the other lies about the case, it seems plausible that the coke was planted.

      And why would a mother contact the police over her 58-year old daughter smoking weed to relieve her cancer symptoms? That doesn't seem to make much sense.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Rog S., 21 Feb 2019 @ 2:34am

      Re: Thanks Mom...

      The modern police and surveillance state was built for, built by, and built with women who willingly call cops, rather than fight their own battles, or fight beside men, who are the primary targets of all policing.

      The feminists of all modern eras encourage hyper -policing, and eugenic policies, as did women who elevated Hitler and his zionists.

      And, in Texas, it was feminist Nikki Craft who famously advocated that men be stalked, and hunted with guns.

      Chicken /egg doesnt fall too far from the roost in this cracked case.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Ed (profile), 20 Feb 2019 @ 8:29am

    Wow, who would have guessed?

    I've written this a thousand times, at least: NEVER TRUST A COP. They are not there to protect citizens, they are solely there to protect themselves and their unions (and maybe the criminals who pay them under the table). Cops will lie, cheat, steal, and kill to further their agenda. They're given undue deference by the courts and prosecutors that is unwarranted and should be rescinded.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Glenn, 20 Feb 2019 @ 10:46am

    "Adrenaline habits" ...or just looking for cash in another asset forfeiture 'cause they were "runnin' low"?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Personanongrata, 20 Feb 2019 @ 3:19pm

    Sometimes Less is More

    We have to grant law enforcement a massive amount of power in order for them to do their job.

    What is exactly is their job? Social order? Justice? Protecting the status quo? Highway brigandry?

    Law enforcement all to often operates under the delusion that the "thin blue line" is all that separates the nation from total anarchy - it is not.

    The seemingly civil society we reside within is in large part due to the result of every day people voluntarily interacting on a person to person basis for an infinite number of purely human motives.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Personanongrata, 20 Feb 2019 @ 3:52pm

    Adrenaline Junkies and Cowboys get People Killed

    The ugly Houston PD drug raid that resulted in four injured officers and two dead "suspects" just keeps getting uglier.

    This drug raid is another in a long dismal line of government instigated and wholly avoidable tragedies.

    This raid is the result of poorly trained individuals (ie police) unknowingly rushing headlong into an avoidable and very dangerous situation of their own creation.

    This raid was aided/abetted by a judge/magistrate that apparently rubber stamped this no-knock warrant.

    This raid is a case point example as to why SWAT para-military style tactics should never be used for warrant service.

    Some key items missing from law enforcement's pre-breach (ie violently entering your home) checklist:

    *Is this a life/death situation?

    *Has target been properly surveilled?

    *Do we know layout of structure?

    *Can target be detained via snatch/grab?

    Rushing headlong into a completely unknown situation to serve a warrant to look for evidence of possible crime is the epitome of having a death wish.

    Are these highly trained SWAT operators or keystone suicide squad members?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Rog S., 21 Feb 2019 @ 12:25am

      Re: Adrenaline Junkies and Cowboys get People Killed

      ....this: *Has target been properly surveilled?

      These are called targeted individuals, which means generally: people who have been caught up in one or another of todays massive, illegal NSA -Fusion Center wiretapping operations, and who the "goid guys ”target based upon illegally obtained information.

      Then, these types of cops try their hardest to frame a person and “parallel construct” incidents, aka, they literally create the crimes, and swoop in to police their own construction.

      The Association of Threat Assessment Prifessionals (ATAP ) calls these Fusion Center directed farces “parallel colluding investigations. ”

      Here is a. pdf from ATAP that documents this cover operation:

      https://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.atapworldwide.org/resource/resmgr/2018-ATAP-Preliminary-TMC-Pr.pdf

      Th ese tactics derive from the incentivized drug war, which is itself thin cover for asset forfeiture (who wants to bet that the couples house has deed issues, or that the state stands to benefit from its sale? )

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Rog S., 21 Feb 2019 @ 12:14am

    To those of us who are old enough to know, we can predict these police coverups the day they hit the news, and those fat fuckers in high heels and badges start whimpering about how hard they tried to keep us safe from the murdered people .

    Policing is rotten to the core.

    Professor Alex Vitale, the Intercepts Alice Speri, and Hamid Khan from Stop LAPD Spying will be hosting an event on the 22nd

    Predictive Policing & the Stalker State:

    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/predictive-policing-the-stalker-state-hamid-khan-alex-vitale-ali ce-speri-tickets-55799340329

    If anyone lives in New York....

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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