Netflix CEO Says Annoyed VPN Users Are 'Inconsequential'

from the you-mean-nothing-to-me dept

When Netflix recently expanded into 190 different countries, we noted that the company ramped up its efforts to block customers that use VPNs to watch geo-restricted content. More accurately, Netflix stepped up its efforts to give the illusion it seriously cracks down on VPN users, since the company has basically admitted that trying to block such users is largely impossible since they can just rotate IP addresses and use other tricks to avoid blacklists. And indeed, that's just what most VPN providers did, updating their services so they still work despite the Netflix crackdown.

Netflix's frankly over-stated "crackdown" is an effort to soothe international broadcasters, justly worried about licensing content to a company that is demolishing decades-old broadcasting power centers. But even superficial as it may be, Netflix's crackdown on VPNs still managed to erode user privacy and security, since obviously there are countless people using VPNs for reasons other than engaging in global Netflix tourism.

With that in mind, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings probably didn't win any new friends this week when stated on the company's latest earnings call that VPN users are loud but, ultimately, "inconsequential":
There was uproar from customers, some of which simply use VPNs to protect their privacy, with a petition calling for the ban to be lifted attracting over 40,000 signatures. But it seems Netflix, which generally cherishes its user experience, doesn’t seem fussed by this uprising.

“It’s a very small but quite vocal minority,” CEO Reed Hastings said during this week’s earnings call. “So it’s really inconsequential to us, as you could see in the Q1 results.”
And, if looking solely at growth, he's not wrong; the company reported that it now serves 81.5 million members, 42% of whom are now outside of the United States. That's 44,740,000 TV subscribers in the States alone, double Comcast's latest tally of 22,347,000 TV customers. While investors are worried about growing competition from Amazon and grandfathered customers' reaction to next-month's price hike (actually announced two years ago), most customers, VPN or otherwise, aren't leaving.

And while Netflix may be annoying some VPN users now, the company has repeatedly stated that its ultimate goal is to eliminate geographic broadcast restrictions entirely. That not only makes it so Netflix tourism is unnecessary, but it should reduce piracy -- something Netflix Chief Product Officer Neil Hunt reiterated earlier this year at CES:
“Our ambition is to do global licensing and global originals, so that over maybe the next five, 10, 20 years, it’ll become more and more similar until it’s not different”... “We don’t buy only for Canada; we’re looking… for all territories; buying a singular territory is not very interesting any more.... When we have global rights, there’s a significant reduction in piracy pressure on that content. If a major title goes out in the U.S. but not in Europe, it’s definitely pirated in Europe, much more than it is if it’s released simultaneously,” Mr. Hunt says.
In other words Netflix's long-term vision may be to eliminate fractured broadcast licensing so users don't need to use VPNs. But in the short term Netflix should probably try a little harder to avoid alienating its more technically savvy customers. They may be "inconsequential" now during Netflix's heyday, but may prove important once Netflix's streaming battle against Amazon, Hulu, Apple, and countless other companies starts to heat up.

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  • icon
    Jeremy Lyman (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 5:40am

    The streaming service Gotham deserves, but not the one it needs right now.

    Part of me thinks this is almost an NSL-type situation where he's legally required to not say what he really thinks about it. God knows how many hoops they've had to jump through for the distribution rights they do have. I can be a pretty spiteful consumer but I'm willing to give Netflix a pass on the VPN "crackdown" while we see if they can renegotiate a release-window-less world. Particularly because it's fairly ineffective if you're determined to stream through a VPN.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Violynne (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 6:18am

    In other words Netflix's long-term vision may be to eliminate fractured broadcast licensing so users don't need to use VPNs.
    This line just contributed to the ignorance of the VPN discussion.

    There will always be a need to use VPN, and this is the point I wish articles like this would make, rather than the placating the idea VPNs are only used to bypass restrictions.

    Because in a perfect world, Netflix should be demanding people be on VPN to access its content rather than kick people out for using VPN.

    It's no surprise companies are moving toward blocking VPN users. How else are they going to abuse your privacy if they don't know who you are.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      John Fenderson (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 6:43am

      Re:

      "This line just contributed to the ignorance of the VPN discussion."

      So much this!

      The article's wording is ambiguous. I'm know that Karl wasn't personally arguing that the only reason to use a VPN is to bypass regional blocking, but he was stating that this was the position of Netflix. However, the wording doesn't make that clear.

      In any case, a bit of stronger pushback on the assertion would have made that more clear.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        Derek Kerton (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 9:23am

        Re: Re:

        Calm down, guys.

        Clearly that sentence was about Netflix's vision on the matter. How clear? It actually includes the words "Netflix's long-term vision may be..." Meanwhile, the entire Techdirt article is about how that is a wrong-headed position.

        If you want Karl's clearly stated viewpoint, it is also in the article:

        "Netflix's crackdown on VPNs still managed to erode user privacy and security, since obviously there are countless people using VPNs for reasons other than engaging in global Netflix tourism."

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • icon
          Violynne (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 12:46pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          My post was directed at Reed Hastings, not Techdirt. I often leave out pronouns in cases I feel the subject was established.

          In hindsight, I can see how my post was targeted at Karl.

          Sorry about that. I generally only target Karl when he's on a rampage to confuse wireless broadband with "unlimited data" because he still believes there's such a thing as "unlimited" ... well, anything, really.
          >:]

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • icon
          John Fenderson (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 5:47pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          It's the problem with text: it makes everything sound so much more somber than it is. I understood Karl, but defended him badly. :)

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 21 Apr 2016 @ 2:01am

      Re:

      You're not wrong about VPNs having their uses, but "legitimate" VPN usage and "I'm using a VPN because IP-holders are acting like children" are really two separate issues.
      The ideal situation, of course, is that VPN use doesn't affect Netflix users at all, but it's only by downplaying its importance that Netflix can reach that point, oddly enough.

      Once there's a unified international Netflix library, VPN use stops being an issue. Being from one nation or another doesn't matter at that point, so whether or not the user is on a VPN becomes irrelevant.

      Like I said, I totally agree with you that VPN access is important but it might be a battle worth losing now if it brings greater victories later on.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Keith Schwerin, 20 Apr 2016 @ 6:38am

    I just stopped subscribing. he doesn't want my business then he won't get it.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Ninja (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 6:39am

    Honestly, it'll be another decade before stupid geo restrictions are dismantled. Either that or the collective sudden death of virtually all the legacy players while their replacements are all enlightened enough to see the stupidity.

    And before Geo restrictions die there will be the service restrictions (ie: GOT only available through HBO service). We'll need another many years before those restrictions are dealt with and the competition becomes service vs service and content vs content instead of what we have today (copyright vs everybody).

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 6:47am

    perhaps these 'inconsequential customers' need to do more than voice there annoyance by perhaps moving their subscriptions to the new Amazon service? maybe them leaving would be a bit more 'consequential' then?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 6:56am

      Re:

      "moving their subscriptions to the new Amazon service"

      If you do, remember in the last software update Amazon removed the VPN config features from the Fire tablets at the same time as they removed encryption. They have said encryption will return, but so far as I know have not commented on bringing back support for VPNs. (IDK about running Amazon streaming via router VPN, haven't done it).

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      John Fenderson (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:31am

      Re:

      This inconsequential customer is no longer a customer.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      xtian (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 9:40am

      Re:

      That would be such a tiny number of people, that no one at Netflix would notice. This fantasy that all but a every small number of people use VPNs at home is right up there with the annual announcements that next year will be the year of the Linux Desktop.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 2:28pm

      Re:

      Actually, these "inconsequential customers" are likely the ones that get their friends and family set up with NetFlix in the first place, and are the ones called in if something goes wrong.

      Let's say every person who signed that pledge represents 20% of the group actually upset by the loss of VPN (size would be bigger for the group actually USING VPN). So 40k signatures represents 200K users out of 41.5M. Still seems like a fairly small subset.

      But now, let's say that those 200K are influencers for around 20 people each. Suddenly, you're affecting roughly 4M out of 41.5M, or approximately 10% of your userbase.

      Is that really inconsequential? Maybe in Nielsen ratings language, but not in reality. Shareholders sure wouldn't want a 10% drop in subscription; neither would employees. You can do a lot less with 10% less revenue. You can also do a lot less with 10% more customer support calls, assuming people already influenced don't leave the service but their influencer is no longer willing to trouble shoot their problems.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        nasch (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 2:49pm

        Re: Re:

        But now, let's say that those 200K are influencers for around 20 people each. Suddenly, you're affecting roughly 4M out of 41.5M, or approximately 10% of your userbase.

        And if they average 2 each, that's 400,000 people, or 1%. See, it all depends on what numbers you make up.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        John Fenderson (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 5:49pm

        Re: Re:

        I'm personally responsible for getting Netflix at least a half dozen new customers.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:05am

    So how does gutting the EU Netflix offering help?
    I just don't understand the reasons why old tv series need to be removed in the UK but not the US if his idea is for less geo-restriction.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      ryuugami, 20 Apr 2016 @ 8:22am

      Re:

      That's almost certainly due to the licensing agreements. If rightsholders refuse to give license for EU, there's (currently) nothing Netflix can do about it.

      Basically, what rightsholders are saying is, use VPN and/or pirate if you want to watch those series.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:17am

    VPNs Should be standard operating practice for all
    ISPs .

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:22am

    How dare those filthy geopirates have the audacity to PAY for the content we won't let them have!

    Something MUST be done about it!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      xtian (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 9:42am

      Re:

      How obtuse. You pay for the service that is provided in your region. If you don't like what you get in, say, Sweden, don't subscribe. You're not paying for what you weren't even offered.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        nasch (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 1:16pm

        Re: Re:

        If you don't like what you get in, say, Sweden, don't subscribe.

        The point is, everybody is worse off that way. The viewer doesn't get the product (though they may find another way to watch) and Netflix and the content providers don't get the money. It's a terrible solution, whereas "release everything everywhere at the same time" benefits everyone, and reduces piracy to boot.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        flyinginn (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 3:37pm

        If you don't like what you get, don't subscribe

        I do not like UK Netflix, which carries a feeble inventory because Sky beat them to most of the current content exclusives. Until recently I subscribed to US Netflix which required some overhead costs for VPN - but worth it for the content inventory. However the VPN crackdown is seriously irritating. If Netflix thinks this means I'm going back to UK Netflix, they are sorely mistaken. Amazon among others isn't great but it's better.

        The entire geolocation 'piracy' issue is venal rubbish. In the era of analog TV and radio, broadcasters did not moan about the fact that waves failed to recognize national borders. When vinyl was king the MPAA did not man border patrols to prevent illicit smuggling of LPs. Amazingly, the entertainment industry seemed to work just as well or better than now, when seeing a current release when it's actually released is considered worse than people trafficking in most of the world.

        If Netflix is unable or unwilling to stand up for its customers I feel sorry for it. The usual commercial wisdom is that one visibly unhappy customer equates to about 100 quietly unhappy customers. There are alternatives to Netflix, and market share can erode as quickly as it builds.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:28am

    His companies value is taking a pounding as we speak.
    Seems he has less control than we imagined.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    crade (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:32am

    "justly " is going pretty far. "understandably worried" maybe, or "predictably worried", certainly not justly.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anon, 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:46am

    I'd love to know how to get around Netflix's VPN block. I'm in the US and use Hide My Ass as my VPN (maybe that's the problem?), and no matter what location I use, I'm still blocked.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Colin (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 8:44am

      Re:

      I'm using a different VPN and the status this morning is the same as it has been since January: I cannot access US Netflix content if I connect to the NYC, NJ or Chicago servers, but if I use the server at a location in the middle of the US (i.e. away from the border with Canada) I'm good to go. Since it is still working I don't really want to share the provider or the location that works.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 10:01am

      Re:

      Hide My Ass exposes your ass easily.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 11:50am

      Re:

      HideMyAss keeps logs and will turn them over to law enforcement at first request. I've read of several who've been done that way. Do not depend on HideMyAss. They won't do what they claim.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 2:22pm

      Re:

      @Anon

      As the first reply to your comment indicates, the problem with asking which services works, is that any of us providing you the answer would also be providing Netflix the answer. The same problem exists for the VPN vendors. If they advertise too hard that can bypass, Netflix will specifically target them making their jobs that much more difficult.

      I feel your pain though. My VPN service worked for a long time (longer than most) but can no longer connect. This article indicates that certain VPN services are readily able to bypass Netflix's new geo-blocking efforts. From the anecdotal comments in the various VPN forums I read, it's been a bumpy road. While some services are still able to bypass, it doesn't appear to me that it will be a sure thing going forward. At least not sure enough to get me to commit to a year's subscription. Netflix has not just been half-assing their geo-blocking efforts. From what I can tell, they have been very (albeit not entirely) successful and it appears they've been enhancing their algorithms to be even more effective over time. For the VPN's that can still bypass, they have to work much harder to do so.

      My plan is to wait it out a while to let the dust settle as I expect a dependable technical workaround will eventually make itself available. I've dropped Netflix in the meantime and am sourcing my content elsewhere.

      ***Also, as your internet buddy, I feel I must advise you switch VPN services.

      Here's why: What Everybody Ought to Know About HideMyAss

      Some better alternatives: Which VPN Services Take Your Anonymity Seriously? 2016 Edition

      Also, don't have sads because you didn't select the ideal VPN initially. It can be very confusing for mere mortals to know which is best (and even then, you don't know for sure who you can trust). Congratulate yourself for at least being smart enough to use a VPN in the first place. So many stupid sheeple don't even do that much to protect themselves.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        anon, 21 Apr 2016 @ 8:45am

        Re: Re:

        Thank you for your reply. I totally understand and agree that no one here should state what VPN works on Netflix. I appreciate the link you shared. I've heard similar things about HMA. I'm not a tech genius by any stretch of the imagination, but I've been studying a spreadsheet of numerous VPN comparisons made and shared online by a gentlemen whose name I forget (I'm at work, and the spreadsheet is on my home computer). It's been very educational. HMA is definitely not the best. I had a feeling that might be why I can't connect to Netflix. I'll be switching soon.

        Thanks again (and to everyone who pointed out HMA's flaws).

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Roger Strong (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 8:11am

    Netflix will be streaming Star Wars: The Force Awakens the year in Canada only. The Starz premium cable channel has an exclusive deal for it in the US.

    They're cracking down on VPNs before Americans start streaming Canadian Netflix for a change.

    Because Americans buying services from an international market the way corporations do? That's consequential. And something they want to prevent.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 8:29am

    "They may be "inconsequential" now during Netflix's heyday, but may prove important once Netflix's streaming battle against Amazon, Hulu, Apple, and countless other companies starts to heat up."

    I doubt it. It would take a significant percentage of those users to suddenly decide they want to use a VPN to watch Netflix (which probably won't happen), or a sudden influx of new subscribers already using VPN connections (not likely either). Competition with Amazon, etc. isn't going to be much of a factor even if they aren't doing the same thing because the number of people savvy enough AND concerned with the NSA or GCHQ knowing they're watching Netflix isn't going to be significant to their bottom line.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 8:32am

    Just like it's inconsequential to torrent your over hyped programming.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Derek Kerton (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 9:27am

    Reed Hastings was Correct

    Netflix's position on VPN users may be wrong, but in the context of a finance call, Hastings was completely correct.

    Words like "inconsequential" have a specific meaning in a quarterly report call with Wall Street. It ONLY means that it does not have a material effect on the bottom line.

    With 44.7 million subscribers, the fact that 40 thousand are upset with a strategic choice (but they're not all quitting) is financially irrelevant.

    He's not saying he doesn't care. He's talking about the business numbers, because that is 100% the context of that conference call.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 2:45pm

      Re: Reed Hastings was Correct

      Having suffered through many an earnings call, I entirely agree with your observations.

      However (from my comment below), I have to call BS in the extreme on Netflix apparently making zero effort to accommodate legitimate VPN usage. I do not believe for a second that they can't validate geo-location by confirmed physical address/account details.

      Regardless of how it affects their bottom line, they've basically given a giant middle finger to their obligation as an internet citizen to promote private and secure use of their service by legitimate customers. That's NOT okay.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 9:58am

    Netflix does not care about its customers, calling them a "minority". Back to torrenting.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Three Pipe Proboem, 20 Apr 2016 @ 10:04am

    How obtuse, xtian, not to understand that every transaction is a two-way street.

    My understanding is that firms live and die on margins of a few percent these days, certainly in the financial world, they're basically battling over a few percentage points right now.

    So perhaps only about 0.1% percent use VPN's, one can easily brush this off as an "inconsequential" number but one could also say that's a substantial percentage of the MARGIN's that companies and finance professionals live and die on. It's funny to see people who worship such small increments in returns fail to recognize the mathematical connection here. You make say 10 changes that affect 0.1% of your customers in a pro-customer way, and you end up with 1% more business... only maybe it's 2% because there is a compounding affect among customers who are likely to leave when their preferences are discounted.

    So this seems to me like using a disingenuous, pseudo-mathematical argument to justify the belief that ignoring consumers is something that could be good for Netflix long-term.

    It also discounts the idea that some of the ~0.1% who get treated like they don't matter *might* just be disproportionate influencers of other consumers, long-term, for Netflix. Doesn't it make sense that technically savvy users might have such influence now, or at least represent a kind of harbinger?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Vincent Clement (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 10:47am

      Re:

      "So this seems to me like using a disingenuous, pseudo-mathematical argument to justify the belief that ignoring consumers is something that could be good for Netflix long-term."

      It's not disingenuous. The whole "the customer is always right" motto is largely a farce. The customer isn't always right and sometimes it's cheaper in the long run to say good bye to that customer versus doing everything possible to keep them.

      Netflix could choose to ignore VPNs but then the content owners may decide to not sell Netflix their content because of 'piracy'. Not securing a show may have a larger impact on the bottom line and customer satisfaction then blocking VPNs.

      You argue against a pseudo-mathematical argument, but your second paragraph is nothing but pseudo-mathematical argument.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        John Fenderson (profile), 20 Apr 2016 @ 6:01pm

        Re: Re:

        "The customer isn't always right and sometimes it's cheaper in the long run to say good bye to that customer versus doing everything possible to keep them."

        Well, I agree with what you mean here, but there's a much more accurate way to say it: what a business can provide is not always able to meet what the customer demands.

        It's not a matter of right or wrong. Netflix deciding to fight VPN usage is not right or wrong, it's a business decision. If a company makes a business decision that you as a customer disagrees with, you complain and try to get the company to change. If the company does not change, you either accept it or stop doing business with them.

        Personally, my decision was to cancel my account. It's not a boycott, and I'm not punishing Netflix. I just made a business decision that they no longer offer a service I'm willing to pay for.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Disgruntled Peasant, 20 Apr 2016 @ 10:36am

    Let them eat cake.

    “The peasants are a very small but quite vocal minority,” Marie Antoinette said during court this week. “So it’s really inconsequential to us, as you can see from our palaces. Let them eat cake.”

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 10:43am

    40,000

    So, 40,000 customers signed a petition opposing the VPN ban.
    Question: How many signed a petition supporting it?
    Maybe that should tell him something.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Three Pipe Problem, 20 Apr 2016 @ 11:43am

    'The whole "the customer is always right" motto is largely a farce.'

    Really, it's not just a proposition that's right or wrong, but is comparable to a dramatic work revolving around "buffoonery and horseplay and typically including crude characterization and ludicrously improbable situations."?

    Good thing I didn't make that argument, then.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 1:23pm

    No VPN = No Netflix

    I dropped my Netflix service for no other reasons than I can no longer access it via VPN.

    - I live in the US.
    - I've lived at the same address for over a decade.
    - I've been a Netflix customer for over a decade.
    - The credit card address I purchased their service on corresponds to that decade old US address.
    - Netflix has mailed many hundreds of DVD's to that decade old US address.

    I have to call BS in the extreme on Netflix apparently making zero effort to accommodate legitimate VPN usage. I do not believe for a second that they can't validate geo-location by confirmed physical address/account details.

    So why didn't they? Whether arrogance, laziness, or collusion in some covert anti-encryption partnership, I don't care. No VPN = No Netflix. Ever.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Kronomex, 20 Apr 2016 @ 4:16pm

    I signed up for Netflix (Australia) free month and what a waste of time it was. Barely 1200 programs available here as compared to the 8k plus available in the US. After roughly 2 hours of searching I found a whole one program to watch, clicked on play and was told that I had to turn off my all privacy add-ons (Adblock, NoScript, etc) and then turn off Firefox private browsing if I wanted to continue. Needless to say, I cancelled Netflix. What a joke!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 20 Apr 2016 @ 7:03pm

      Re:

      After roughly 2 hours of searching I found a whole one program to watch, clicked on play and was told that I had to turn off my all privacy add-ons (Adblock, NoScript, etc) and then turn off Firefox private browsing if I wanted to continue. Needless to say, I cancelled Netflix. What a joke!

      There has to be a better way.
      Oh, wait, there is.
      If I can't use my VPN for Netflix, then I'll use it for something else.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    memes, 21 Apr 2016 @ 4:11am

    i love netflix. it just recently launch in india.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Poodintane, 21 Apr 2016 @ 9:24am

    Inconsequential?

    With 25% of all users now connecting with VPN, that is not really inconsequential. Also, we are not talking about STEALING the signal-- you still have to pay for the Netflix membership. Finally, not sure why, but my http://SlickVPN account seems to still work just fine.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Jimmy, 22 Apr 2016 @ 10:26pm

    I am still accessing Netflix from Hong Kong. It is true that Netflix is blocking VPN Netflix is detecting users real IP with some DNS-browser trick like WebRTC, which caused one of my VPNs to stop working. Finally got it working again using “HIDE-MY-IP” VPN and a settings called DNS protection (that must be turned on) which blocks Netflix from seeing your real IP... now I can watch US/UK Netflix again from Hong Kong without any issue.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    darlingbannon, 13 Mar 2017 @ 7:26pm

    Can't tell you the many times one of my VPNs got banned by these guys.Tries the whole WebRTC thing and still got blocked. I pay for this service and to use it I also have to pay for a vpn(currently using vpnbaron, no block so far).

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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