The Five Day Workweek Changes Our Climate

from the though,-we're-not-sure-how... dept

Found over at GMSV is the not particularly useful news that the five day workweek is effecting the climate. In other words, there's a noticeable difference in climate on weekdays and weekends - and the only reasonable explanation is that it has something to do with folks going to work (more driving, more aerosol, etc.). Of course, figuring out what the effect really is isn't quite so clear. In some places it went one way, while in other locations it went the other way. Though (and there's a nice little map on the page), it looks as though the middle of the country moved in one direction, while the coasts moved in the other. No matter what, I'm trying to figure out how we can use this information to push for a standard four day workweek. Any ideas?

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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 17 Sep 2003 @ 7:37pm

    Pushing the 4 day work week standard...

    Sure, there's an easy way to get the 4 day work week standard accepted by industry:

    Would you be willing to work for half your pay if you only had to work a 4 day work week?

    Any other method of getting a 4 day work week is doomed to failure.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Bill, 18 Sep 2003 @ 8:20am

      Re: Pushing the 4 day work week standard...

      Would you be willing to work for half your pay if you only had to work a 4 day work week?

      hmmm. 50% cut in pay for a 20% reduction in labor... sounds like a bargain to me.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    dorpus, 17 Sep 2003 @ 9:07pm

    The Germhouse Effect

    Since most weather stations are located near concrete or asphalt, they tend to measure local climate effects. It's no surprise if weather stations in the more densely populated coasts show a rise.

    But never mind the greenhouse effect -- there are naturally occurring germhouse effects that can raise the temperature up to 830 C.

    I'm wondering if there will emerge bacteria (naturally or artificially) that like to grow under asphalt and emit huge amounts of heat, so they turn our highways into tarways. We could have cars that spontaneously combust.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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