DailyDirt: You Know The First Guy To Run A Marathon Died Immediately After, Right?

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

Everything in moderation… including exercise. Exercise is undoubtedly good for you if you compare it to a sedentary lifestyle, but running marathons every day isn’t going to do you any favors. But where is the optimal sweet spot for exercise? It’s not the same for everyone, but it looks like most Americans aren’t doing enough. Fortunately, the right amount probably isn’t as much as you’d think.

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Comments on “DailyDirt: You Know The First Guy To Run A Marathon Died Immediately After, Right?”

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11 Comments
OldGeezer (profile) says:

Malware

That second link has the phony message to update flash player to see a video. I went to the Adobe site and installed the latest version and still got that message. A friend of mine borrowed my laptop and clicked on a link like that and installed ransomware. I had just made a clone the day before so I just swapped out the disk. This may be that bad but you should NEVER click to update anything except from the official site. the link for this is:

https://archive.is/o/zmHVC/www.adobe.com/go/getflash/
08 30a-04 15p

The link to update flash is:

https://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

Unfortunately some legitimate sites are careless about what ads the use.

Paul Renault (profile) says:

You get out what you put in, apparently.

Years ago, I remember reading a study that found that, if you performed life-extending exercise regularly, your lifespan would be extended by roughly the amount of time you spent exercising. The authors reported the findings are somewhat disheartening.

So if you do exercise, so something you’ll enjoy doing.

John Fenderson (profile) says:

Re: Re: You get out what you put in, apparently.

Not for everybody. Some people really hate exercising, and doing it makes them actively unhappy. Some people find that after they have maintained an exercise regime long enough, it causes them to feel physically worse.

Different people need different things to maintain a healthy body and life. Exercise as a specific activity is a great thing for most people, but there are those for whom it’s the exact opposite.

Gene Cavanaugh (profile) says:

Exercising

I find the quality of the exercise is at least as important as the quantity.
Walking slowly, exercising with very light weights – I don’t really see much benefit. Walking faster (like, trying to keep up with my oldest daughter), working out with weights that challenge me a bit, big benefit.
I can almost make a chart of length of time versus quality of exercise for maximum benefit (at least, for me) and less time but more challenge (to a point) versus a long time but less challenge – same benefit.
Be interested in seeing a controlled study about that.

crade (profile) says:

Your headlines dont really seem to match the links they point to. especially the first one, which seems to claim overly strenous exercise doesn’t help much, but neither does it increase any risks:

“The studies also found that prolonged or intense exercise is unlikely to be harmful and could add years to people’s lives.”

“At that point, the benefits plateaued, the researchers found, but they never significantly declined. Those few individuals engaging in 10 times or more the recommended exercise dose gained about the same reduction in mortality risk as people who simply met the guidelines. They did not gain significantly more health bang for all of those additional hours spent sweating. But they also did not increase their risk of dying young.”

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