Forget SOPA, You Should Be Worried About This Cybersecurity Bill

from the this-is-not-good dept

While most folks are looking elsewhere, it appears that Congress is trying to see if it can sneak an absolutely awful “cybersecurity” bill through Congress. We’ve discussed how there’s been some fighting on the Senate side concerning which cybersecurity bill to support, but there’s a similar battle going on in the House, and it appears that the Rogers-Ruppersberger bill, known as CISPA (for Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) or HR 3523 is winning out, with a planned attempt to move it through Congress later this month. The bill is awful — and yet has somehow already gained over 100 sponsors. In an attempt to pretend that this isn’t a “SOPA-like” problem, the supporters of this bill are highlighting the fact that Facebook, Microsoft and TechAmerica are supporting this bill.

However, this is a terrible bill for a variety of reasons. Even if we accept the mantra that new cybersecurity laws are needed (despite a near total lack of evidence to support this — and, no, fearmongering about planes falling from the sky doesn’t count), this bill has serious problems. As CDT warned when this bill first came out, it’s way too broad and overreaching:

However, the bill goes much further, permitting ISPs to funnel private communications and related information back to the government without adequate privacy protections and controls. The bill does not specify which agencies ISPs could disclose customer data to, but the structure and incentives in the bill raise a very real possibility that the National Security Agency or the DOD’s Cybercommand would be the primary recipient.

If it’s confusing to keep track of these different cybersecurity bills, the ACLU has put together a handy dandy (scary) chart (pdf) comparing them all. And what comes through loud and clear is that the Rogers-Ruppersberger CISPA bill will allow for much greater information sharing of companies sending private communication data to the government — including the NSA, who has been trying very, very hard to get this data, not for cybersecurity reasons, but to spy on people. CISPA has broad definitions, very few limits on who can get the data, almost no limitations on how the government can use the data (i.e. they can use it to monitor, not just for cybersecurity reasons) and (of course) no real oversight at all for how the data is (ab)used.

CDT has put together a reasonable list of 8 things that should be done if politicians don’t want to turn cybersecurity into a new SOPA, but so far, Congress is ignoring nearly all of them. Similarly, EFF is asking people to speak out against CISPA, noting that it basically creates a cybersecurity exemption to all existing laws. If the government wants your data, it just needs to claim that it got it for “cybersecurity purposes” and then it can do pretty much whatever it wants.

This is a really bad bill and it looks like it’s going to pass unless people speak up.

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Comments on “Forget SOPA, You Should Be Worried About This Cybersecurity Bill”

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103 Comments
Anonymous Coward says:

Why does it always go this way...

Why is spying on U.S. citizens always the solution?

Why can’t security just be…increased? Why can’t the people implementing the solutions be held accountable for doing a poor job?

Why can’t this money go into educating people to think in a more secure way and implement better procedures?

PlagueSD says:

Re: Why does it always go this way...

That’s the last thing the Government needs…Educated citizens. Why do you think they’re working so hard to “pass” students with policies such as “no one left behind.” Also, the money that US states spend on prisons has risen at 6x the rate of spending on higher education. http://t.co/7BaxIzQd. Why don’t we stop trying to put everyone in prison and start educating them.

raoul says:

Re: Why does it always go this way...

your asking the questions that the average person would say yeah what a great idea. but a politician says bugger that, that means i cant just sit back and have my pie.

spying on you gives them all the information they will need with minimal work, and if no one speaks up, it WILL happen.

it already is… PRE NAZI MUUHHRRICA

Crios Century says:

Re: Why does it always go this way...

It’s america sir. We take credit only for our great oppressions on evil, but not fore the oppressions we make that are. The deeper in to life we go, the more hell we spawn. Our government is one of billions of issues that just need to stop abd shut the hell up for once. Hopefully anonymous and others who are bluntly saying “STFU” right at them will get to them. Right about now is the timing for a revolt, as have many other countries in the past. This one will more or less involve death and destruction, but more or less, the government will fold in on itself and we, the people, shall take it.

Wally (profile) says:

Re: Why does it always go this way...

I have an answer for each of the questions you asked:

1. According to the U.S. Gov…we are all pirates of intellectual properties.

2. Security “increase” brings more ridiculous, useless, one-sided, taxpayer dollar wasting Bills or Laws designed to undermine our freedoms as Americans, to the drawing table.

3. Most of the money educating people should be spent educating our Government agencies on what the internet is and how to use it in daily life (this means you U.S. DOJ).

In other words I totally agree 🙂

Bryce Weiner says:

Re: Why does it always go this way...

What is the benefit that is supposed to be provided by the government getting this information?

Is the return worth the cost in privacy?

That’s an argument that goes back 300 years or more, but there hasn’t been any indication of WHY this would be something that our tax dollars should be spent on.

Maybe if people understood the benefits of sacrificing a little freedom they might not mind as much.

We sacrifice freedoms all the time for security. For further information go to a library and reade John Locke.

weneedhelp (profile) says:

Re: Re:

During the first revolution, we only had to fight cannons and muskets. The next one will be called The Great American Slaughter.

They will take all those war toys paid for by the American public and turn them against us.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_Denial_System
https://www.commondreams.org/video/2011/11/22

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re:

You WAY overvalue the average person’s desire to take action and fight for anything. Most are either a) happy enough to coast through life or b) would rather just leave and go somewhere better than actually fight for it.

I’m currently on a), but would not be averse to b) if things get as bad as it might.

Anonymous Coward says:

Even if we accept the mantra that new cybersecurity laws are needed (despite a near total lack of evidence to support this — and, no, fearmongering about planes falling from the sky doesn’t count), this bill has serious problems.

Thank douchebags like lulzsec and others. Stupid shit like taking down the White House website, the Library of Congress (really??) and other government sites has created all the justification and motivation for more cyber security laws.

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re: Re: Re:

-1 Interwebs to you Sir.

This is not sufficient rational to take away more privacy from you, freedoms from you and from those you care about.

Your shortsightedness is as frightening. I am concerned that you and others like you that drank the government kool-aid of fear and suspicion cannot see the bigger picture. More government intervention in your life, whether it is for protecting *AA profits or supposedly protecting you from terrorists is simply unacceptable.

I am not in favor of the government watching over every thing I or mine does. Why are you??

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re:

there will always be those who push the boundaries of what is acceptable morally and lawfully. to punish the entire populous based on the actions of such a small number of people is just foolish.

To put that argument into perspective, lets change the crime into something physical like murder. it’s bad, we can agree on that. some people murder others. so what if we were all punished for the last murder… that 17 yr old in Florida for example. how would you feel about that?

Hobbs says:

Re: Re:

yur pretty much misinformed…SOPA and PIPA were pushed by Hollywood etc.,big media…the govt. wants to use it to clamp down on internet freedom and track trends for the benefit of control…control for their corporate masters,the richest 1%…ALL of what our government has been doing since 911 has been not about external threats and national security,thats just an excuse…its about control and manipulation of the common folk for the benefit of the rich and very rich…the ones that hold the power and yeild it with the government as their tool.

Rob says:

Re: Re:

Uhh this isnt to catch lulzsec or Anonymous, these guys are wayyy smarter thany anyone in your government, they will get around this like a showhorse clears a hurdle. Non this cybersecuroty bill is to catch you the average citizen. The corperate masters want to know when you are pirating stuff so they can arrest or sue you or both. It’s also for the powers that be to make sure there is nothing like the Arab Spring in the united states. Look at the role of twitter and Youtube, and facebook and texting in the popular uprisings around the world. Look at it in your own Occupy movements. The people who are in power want to keep the average joe from seeing the evidence or repression and organizing against it. This is to keep you guys in line…no one else

Tarlach says:

Re: Re:

Yeah, And do you know why they’re doing those things or are you just going in half-cocked on an issue that goes deeper than some DDoS attempts by Lulzsec and Anonymous. The government is bringing down a hammer quietly on the freedom we have in the internet. It’s only a matter of time before the government decides to implement that killswitch, or place monitors like these all over the country. We’ve seen it in North Africa, Why not here? Feasiblity is not an issue. We have to stop these bills that are getting passed under our noses, and fast. Freedom my ass. It’s a sham for a aristocracy.

Overcast (profile) says:

If this bill is such a bad thing to worry about, why wasn’t it reported on until now?

That’s by design – haven’t people noticed congress’ tactics yet?

Release some nonsensical bill that could never pass – while a furor ensues – they pass the one they had intended to pass all along behind the backs of the people. It’s why Dec. 31st is such a popular day for just that.

Overcast (profile) says:

Anyone know where the list of actual cosponsors can be found? The links just say that there are over 100 of them.

http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/112/hr3523

There’s a link on there.

Rep. Mark Amodei [R-NV2]
Rep. Michele Bachmann [R-MN6]
Rep. Dan Boren [D-OK2]
Rep. Michael Burgess [R-TX26]
Rep. Ken Calvert [R-CA44]
Rep. Ben Chandler [D-KY6]
Rep. Michael Conaway [R-TX11]
Rep. Norman ?Norm? Dicks [D-WA6]
Rep. John ?Phil? Gingrey [R-GA11]
Rep. Luis Guti?rrez [D-IL4]
Rep. Joe Heck [R-NV3]
Rep. Peter ?Pete? King [R-NY3]
Rep. Adam Kinzinger [R-IL11]
Rep. James ?Jim? Langevin [D-RI2]
Rep. Frank LoBiondo [R-NJ2]
Rep. Michael McCaul [R-TX10]
Rep. Jeff Miller [R-FL1]
Rep. Sue Myrick [R-NC9]
Rep. Devin Nunes [R-CA21]
Rep. Mike Pompeo [R-KS4]
Rep. Thomas Rooney [R-FL16]
Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger [D-MD2]
Rep. John Shimkus [R-IL19]
Rep. Lee Terry [R-NE2]
Rep. Michael ?Mike? Thompson [D-CA1]
Rep. Frederick ?Fred? Upton [R-MI6]
Rep. Greg Walden [R-OR2]
Rep. Lynn Westmoreland [R-GA3]
Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen [R-NJ11] (joined Dec 08, 2011)
Rep. Robert Latta [R-OH5] (joined Dec 08, 2011)
Rep. Patrick McHenry [R-NC10] (joined Dec 08, 2011)
Rep. Ben Quayle [R-AZ3] (joined Dec 08, 2011)
Rep. Kevin Yoder [R-KS3] (joined Dec 08, 2011)
Rep. David ?Dave? Camp [R-MI4] (joined Dec 16, 2011)
Rep. Timothy Walberg [R-MI7] (joined Dec 16, 2011)
Rep. Anna Eshoo [D-CA14] (joined Dec 20, 2011)
Rep. Michael Michaud [D-ME2] (joined Dec 20, 2011)
Rep. Mike Coffman [R-CO6] (joined Jan 18, 2012)
Rep. Robert ?Bob? Goodlatte [R-VA6] (joined Jan 18, 2012)
Rep. David McKinley [R-WV1] (joined Jan 18, 2012)
Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers [R-WA5] (joined Jan 18, 2012)
Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen [R-FL18] (joined Jan 18, 2012)
Rep. John Sullivan [R-OK1] (joined Jan 18, 2012)
Rep. Randy Forbes [R-VA4] (joined Jan 25, 2012)
Rep. Frank Wolf [R-VA10] (joined Jan 25, 2012)
Rep. Darrell Issa [R-CA49] (joined Jan 31, 2012)
Rep. Gary Miller [R-CA42] (joined Jan 31, 2012)
Rep. Clifford ?Cliff? Stearns [R-FL6] (joined Jan 31, 2012)
Rep. Tom Cole [R-OK4] (joined Feb 01, 2012)
Rep. Michael Turner [R-OH3] (joined Feb 01, 2012)
Rep. Mo Brooks [R-AL5] (joined Feb 07, 2012)
Rep. John Carter [R-TX31] (joined Feb 07, 2012)
Rep. Vicky Hartzler [R-MO4] (joined Feb 07, 2012)
Rep. Bill Huizenga [R-MI2] (joined Feb 07, 2012)
Rep. Dan Benishek [R-MI1] (joined Feb 13, 2012)
Rep. Paul Broun [R-GA10] (joined Feb 13, 2012)
Rep. Michael Grimm [R-NY13] (joined Feb 13, 2012)
Rep. Brett Guthrie [R-KY2] (joined Feb 13, 2012)
Rep. Candice Miller [R-MI10] (joined Feb 13, 2012)
Rep. Michael ?Mike? Rogers [R-AL3] (joined Feb 13, 2012)
Rep. Geoff Davis [R-KY4] (joined Feb 14, 2012)
Rep. Doc Hastings [R-WA4] (joined Feb 14, 2012)
Rep. Leonard Lance [R-NJ7] (joined Feb 14, 2012)
Rep. Patrick Meehan [R-PA7] (joined Feb 14, 2012)
Rep. Spencer Bachus [R-AL6] (joined Feb 16, 2012)
Rep. Mary Bono Mack [R-CA45] (joined Feb 16, 2012)
Rep. John Kline [R-MN2] (joined Feb 16, 2012)
Rep. Pete Olson [R-TX22] (joined Feb 16, 2012)
Rep. Aaron Schock [R-IL18] (joined Feb 16, 2012)
Rep. William ?Bill? Shuster [R-PA9] (joined Feb 16, 2012)
Rep. Joe Baca [D-CA43] (joined Feb 27, 2012)
Rep. Chuck Fleischmann [R-TN3] (joined Feb 27, 2012)
Rep. Phil Roe [R-TN1] (joined Feb 27, 2012)
Rep. Leonard Boswell [D-IA3] (joined Feb 28, 2012)
Rep. Kristi Noem [R-SD0] (joined Feb 28, 2012)
Rep. Rob Wittman [R-VA1] (joined Mar 01, 2012)
Rep. Marsha Blackburn [R-TN7] (joined Mar 05, 2012)
Rep. Alcee Hastings [D-FL23] (joined Mar 05, 2012)
Rep. Randy Hultgren [R-IL14] (joined Mar 05, 2012)
Rep. Robert Hurt [R-VA5] (joined Mar 05, 2012)
Rep. Rick Crawford [R-AR1] (joined Mar 08, 2012)
Rep. Bill Johnson [R-OH6] (joined Mar 08, 2012)
Rep. Adrian Smith [R-NE3] (joined Mar 08, 2012)
Del. Madeleine Bordallo [D-GU0] (joined Mar 19, 2012)
Rep. Trent Franks [R-AZ2] (joined Mar 19, 2012)
Rep. Rick Larsen [D-WA2] (joined Mar 19, 2012)
Rep. Albio Sires [D-NJ13] (joined Mar 19, 2012)
Rep. Edolphus ?Ed? Towns [D-NY10] (joined Mar 19, 2012)
Rep. Jim Cooper [D-TN5] (joined Mar 22, 2012)
Rep. Joseph Pitts [R-PA16] (joined Mar 22, 2012)
Rep. Mike Ross [D-AR4] (joined Mar 22, 2012)
Rep. Jon Runyan [R-NJ3] (joined Mar 22, 2012)
Rep. Roscoe Bartlett [R-MD6] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Brian Bilbray [R-CA50] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Dennis Cardoza [D-CA18] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Jim Costa [D-CA20] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Morgan Griffith [R-VA9] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Larry Kissell [D-NC8] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Mike McIntyre [D-NC7] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. William Owens [D-NY23] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Collin Peterson [D-MN7] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Steve Scalise [R-LA1] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Heath Shuler [D-NC11] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Steve Stivers [R-OH15] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Addison ?Joe? Wilson [R-SC2] (joined Mar 29, 2012)
Rep. Rob Woodall [R-GA7] (joined Mar 29, 2012)

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re:

I just called all the reps from my state and none of the staffers were willing to tell me where the representative stood on these bill. This list confirms that the staffers must know and are not willing to tell the very people they “represent” the truth. Its sickening how so disconnected the voters’ perspective is from the process.

Wendy Cockcroft (user link) says:

Re: Re: Re:

That would work if it didn’t already have bipartisan support. Read through the list of co-sponsors.

We’ve got some similar laws to be announced at the Queen’s speech later on this year. I’ve already come down on my MP like a ton of bricks over it but I can’t be the only one or it’ll pass.

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-17580906

Overcast (profile) says:

My rep was a co-sponser and I just emailed him 🙂

Do the same folks – get the fires burning on this. Don’t let them sneak this one past us.

If a corporation is entitled to this ‘information’ – then it should be public.

Why do they get more rights than citizens, when the constitution outlines the guarantee of individual rights – not corporate rights.

Anonymous Coward says:

what the hell is this absolutely desperate need for the US government to be able to rip apart every part of it’s citizens privacy? what is happening that is so dastardly that every citizen is an active part of it? if there are particular people who are considered a threat, watch them, but not the entire country. that is insane! going back to the ‘reds under the bed’, ‘everyone is a communist’ days. ridiculous!

Overcast (profile) says:

Funny you use this analogy, when literally, one of the scare tactics being used to push crap like this, is that planes are going to start falling from the sky.

Let them, as long as my rights are upheld.

You can never get real ‘security’ from a government that’s not willing to also give you your liberty; at that point you just have a different entity that you’ll need to be secured from: Government.

For if Government provides enough ‘security’ to control everything, then the people will need security FROM government.

I mean – any tyrant can say he’ll provide ‘security’ – few leaders really work to provide ‘rights’. Perhaps this sums it up best:

Thomas Jefferson: ?A government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take away everything you have.?

Overcast (profile) says:

HA!

You really think that some idiot kids doing some temporary vandalism is the justification needed to take away your privacy and letting the gov’t spy on everyone? Are you insane?

No, but our ‘leaders’ are insane…

These are just the things they use to push these laws. Of course, the media hypes it like it’s a huge deal.

We, as IT people know that ‘lulzsec’ – or whatever, is likely pimple faced basement dwelling intorverts that know how to script well, because the only friends they have are Notepad++ and The internet.

But give that to the media and the spin becomes:

“Malicious hacking group ‘lulsec’ is threatening the country by hacking the DOD’s web site… ” – yada yada…

When all that was really done is some joke put up on the main page, etc.

So NO, it’s not a legit justification technically, but spin it in the media and it will become the ‘justification’ that congress needs to pass more laws that take away our rights and give them to corporations.

illunatic (user link) says:

yet another...

It is unfortunate, but it seems there will continue to be an onslaught of bills attempting to throw user privacy out of the window in the name of protecting corporate interests.

It may sounds like a broken record, but that is because these attempts to roll over our rights with poorly written bills continue to appear.

I don’t even think SOPA was off the table when CISPA was introduced.

http://blog.greenpirate.org/cispa-hr-3523-the-new-sopa/

Anonymous Coward says:

People need to teach them a lesson and refuse to buy,rent,download, and go to the theaters.
30-60 Days I can guarantee that would make the fuckers change their viewpoint pretty fucking fast.

I’ve not seen a movie since the raid on mega. It was boring at first to give up all the T.V. time and trips to the theaters.

With the extra 3-4 hours I save every single day I’ve became way more productive and have managed to shed a few pounds.

So with that said I will say thank you very much to the movie and music industries for giving me my life back.

The only regrets I have is that if I knew this is the way they wanted stuff I would have never bought satellite T.V. or wasted countless gallons of gas for the 40 mile round trip to see movies on the big screen every week.

Even if they did back down and tell the world sorry I will never be a customer for any of them again.

I hope some others decide to do similar shit and find out something about yourself you would’ve never known otherwise. For me it was losing the weight about 35 lbs.

I’m no longer a fat ass and I managed to do it all on the fuck MPAA,RIAA diet.

Scott (user link) says:

Does anyone remember?

Does anyone remember Obama’s promises during his campaign. He promised the American people more transparency in government and stated all proposed legislation would be available for view by the public prior to congressional action.
Need a laugh read this
If anything, the government has become less transparent under his watch. Do I think McCain would have been better… of course not.
The question is, when are we going to stand-up to this tyranny by deception? When will we say enough is enough, and demand a government for the people, not a government watching the people?

CJ (profile) says:

thinking caps plus data

Maybe we should be trying to figure out from it’s beginning on whom is try so hard to push these type Bills through?

Seems as fast as one gets killed there is always another to replace it. So there has to be a certain group, or business that has their heart set on passing this. It doesn’t spring up without a reason. Someone has to do the pushing.

Wendy Cockcroft (user link) says:

Re: thinking caps plus data

Take a close look at the wording in all of them and you’ll find references to “protecting the economy” and intellectual property.

The people behind it are the MPAA, RIAA, and other IP maximalists. Their other projects include ACTA and TPP. They won’t stop until IP law is reformed or they succeed in getting us all under surveillance by our own ISPs.

Personally, I prefer IP reform. If there’s less for them to gain by pushing such laws they’ll stop pushing them.

Anonymous Coward says:

Allow Fascist Creeps to seize office any way they can...

and Fascism creeps.

People in the us are stunningly stupid if they think that it’s anything even remotely resembling a free country that they live in.

That only happens in the movies.

If you really care, stop buying into the relentless lying propaganda that pours out of your so-called media and so-called government and do something to fix the problem.

Remember that monster-maker Herr Karl Rove endorsed Obummer last time around? Do you get it now?

Delixcroix says:

Is there no nd to these billsmaking a massive spy network for the government? As a Canadian these bills worry me the most because not only are they powerful enough to start filling our prisons up with nerds… geeks… And programmers who’s inteligence makes them a threat to “national security” aka “Governments international Slave Network for monopoly money”

The american dollar holds no value as anything but a token of servitude. The less money you have the greater slave you will always be.

Want to watch the world burn? Take All your money, all your reasources out of banks. Banks that take your money and reasources that support the corperations that enslave you and the government that imprisons the free thinkers of our society.

The only way anyone is going to get out of this alive is what could only be called a governmental Genocide. Sad to say but Republicans and Democratic officials of every sort is going to have to die. The people need to form a new government. One based on Freedom not slavery and security.

Nobody wants to say bloodshed isn’t the only way out of slavery but the government has already resorted to bloodshed upon the people.

Do your part and show that the people can be terrorists because anyone who opposes the Secured slavery of all American people has already been labeled a terrorist. Your going to prison anyways in the long run so you might as well fight the power that’s going to put you there.

You are all violent criminals expressiong violent ideas and fighting for freedom. Something you do not have. Rally before the government has the power to cut down free thinking before it can oppose it.

If the people don’t stand up now and one of these bills passes. You will simply always be slaves. Step out of line and I am sure the blue collar slaves will have built a prison for you.

TaCktiX (profile) says:

I sent an email to all of my representatives (all of which thankfully are not cosponsors). If things start ramping up I’ll call them as well (did the same thing for SOPA, the next day the senator I called came out against so I know I wasn’t the only one).

One thing to keep in mind is that specific and well-thought reasons for opposing legislation goes far further than a form letter. So when given the option, make sure to put your personal touch to it.

Anonymous Coward says:

Have any of you bothered to read the bill?
what I see this bill doing is granting designated “private” entities such as a Blackwater or its equivalent access to classified information and grants them the ability to SPY on behalf of the US government: its privetising the CIA and FBI
with complete protection from wrong doing!!!

Justin says:

HACKERS HAVE PROVEN REVOLUTION IS POSSIBLE

LUZSEC ANONYMOUS AND HOPEFULLY MANY MORE TO COME ARE THE NEW WORLDS REVOLUTIONARY GUARD. WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT INJUSTICES COMMITTED BY AUTHORITIES. HACKING IS OUR ONLY HOPE. GONE ARE THE PRINCIPLES OF PRIVATE MILITIA. THEY ARE NOW TERRORIST. BUT THE REAL TERRORISM BEGAN HERE. AGAINST EVERY NON WHITE CITIZEN AND HAS BEEN SUBVERTED AND ROOTED AS US AGAINST THEM WE ARE THEM. UNLESS SOMEONE EXPOSES IT WE WILL CONTINUE TO BELIEVE LIES. HACK FOR GOOD WE’RE ALL COUNTING ON YOU. THIS IS A DEVICE OF SUBVERTING POWER. GRANTING CORPORATIONS AUTHORITY. THIS IS HOW THE DOD GETS AROUND THE GENEVA CONVENTION RULES REGARDING TORTURE AND WAR CRIMES. CORPORATIONS DON’T SIGN TREATIES OR HAVE CONSTITUTIONAL OBLIGATION. FEAR THOSE PROPAGATING SUBVERSION FORCE THEM INTO THE LIGHT HACK HACK HACK… HIDE YOUR TRACKS.

Justin says:

HACKERS HAVE PROVEN REVOLUTION IS POSSIBLE

LUZSEC ANONYMOUS AND HOPEFULLY MANY MORE TO COME ARE THE NEW WORLDS REVOLUTIONARY GUARD. WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT INJUSTICES COMMITTED BY AUTHORITIES. HACKING IS OUR ONLY HOPE. GONE ARE THE PRINCIPLES OF PRIVATE MILITIA. THEY ARE NOW TERRORIST. BUT THE REAL TERRORISM BEGAN HERE. AGAINST EVERY NON WHITE CITIZEN AND HAS BEEN SUBVERTED AND ROOTED AS US AGAINST THEM WE ARE THEM. UNLESS SOMEONE EXPOSES IT WE WILL CONTINUE TO BELIEVE LIES. HACK FOR GOOD WE’RE ALL COUNTING ON YOU. THIS IS A DEVICE OF SUBVERTING POWER. GRANTING CORPORATIONS AUTHORITY. THIS IS HOW THE DOD GETS AROUND THE GENEVA CONVENTION RULES REGARDING TORTURE AND WAR CRIMES. CORPORATIONS DON’T SIGN TREATIES OR HAVE CONSTITUTIONAL OBLIGATION. FEAR THOSE PROPAGATING SUBVERSION FORCE THEM INTO THE LIGHT HACK HACK HACK… HIDE YOUR TRACKS.

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