US Marshals Step In To Keep Florida Police Department's Stingray Documents Out Of The Hands Of The ACLU

from the big-brother-protected-little-brother dept

The incredible wall of secrecy erected by law enforcement agencies around their use of "stingray" devices (cell tower spoofers) continues. Harris, the manufacturer of most of these devices, gets the secrecy ball rolling with non-disclosure agreements, which law enforcement agencies have liberally interpreted as a right to refuse public records requests and, in one case, an excuse not to seek warrants before deploying the devices.

In a very surprising move, the US government has inserted itself between a Florida police department and the ACLU by seizing requested documents. The ACLU has been seeking information on the Sarasota Police Department's use of cell tower spoofers, only to find itself being further separated from the relevant documents every step of the way.

The reason the ACLU wanted to dig deeper into the Sarasota PD's files presented itself in the first response.

The Sarasota Police initially told us that they had responsive records, including applications filed by and orders issued to a local detective under the state“trap and trace” statute that he had relied on for authorization to conduct stingray surveillance. That raised the first red flag, since trap and trace orders are typically used to gather limited information about the phone numbers of incoming calls, not to track cell phones inside private spaces or conduct dragnet surveillance. And, such orders require a very low legal standard.
Trap and trace/pen register statutes are routinely being abused as a way to route around warrant requirements. The NSA's bulk record collection was partially "justified" by a very liberal reading of pen register statutes. What once was a warrantless, targeted, limited-time collection has now become a catch-all for stingray surveillance and NSA programs.

The Sarasota Police set up an appointment for the ACLU to view its stingray files (as is required under Florida law), but that meeting was cancelled shortly before it was supposed to take place.
[A]n assistant city attorney sent an email cancelling the meeting on the basis that the U.S. Marshals Service was claiming the records as their own and instructing the local cops not to release them. Their explanation: the Marshals Service had deputized the local officer, and therefore the records were actually the property of the federal government.
This interdiction by the US government to lock up documents the ACLU is seeking is astounding enough, but what every other entity involved did is even more so.

Nathan Wessler at the ACLU points out that, US Marshals or no, the police department is required to hold onto any documents requested for at least 30 days. Instead, it allowed the US Marshals to move the records off-site to an undisclosed location. With those files out of reach for an undetermined amount of time, the ACLU approached the court which would have signed off on trap and trace orders requested by the Sarasota Police only to find out that no such records exist.
The court doesn’t even have docket entries indicating that applications were filed or orders issued. Apparently, the local detective came to court with a single paper copy of the application and proposed order, and then walked out with the same papers once signed by a judge.
Another breach of records requirements and, again, tied to the Sarasota PD's stringray usage.

The ACLU has now filed an emergency motion seeking to block the Sarasota PD from turning over any more files to the US Marshals Service. It also asks the court to find that the department violated state law by turning over the requested documents to the US government.

The obvious question here is why both of these agencies are so reluctant to turn over these documents. If they're willing to break state records laws (the local court being complicit in this activity), the information contained must be pretty damaging. What has been discovered already points to the department's deliberate avoidance of a paper trail, what with the single document requests and the misuse of the trap and trace statute to avoid filing warrant requests.

If you've got nothing to hide, then you have nothing to fear, as the saying goes. The government expects us to live by that adage as it deploys warrantless surveillance, but it seems unable to hold itself to the same standard.



Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    icon
    Anon E. Mous (profile), Jun 4th, 2014 @ 11:19am

    I thought Obama said that he would have a fair an open government and that his government would not be like the Bush era government was.

    The lengths that the Obama government will go to make sure none of their technology that is used to spy on Americans is astounding.

    The U.S. government is stacking the deck and using technology against it's own citizen and is relentless in the pursuit to keep it's citizens in the dark with regards to it's use and who and how it is deployed.

    Gone are the days when you could trust your government

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    mcinsand, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 11:41am

    As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    You sound like it's news that Obama and Bush are alike. If you haven't figured it out by now, there's more difference between Coke and Pepsi than there is between Bush and Obama, whether you're talking about trashing the constitution, prolonged discretionary wars in the Middle East, TARP pork handouts, entitlement expansions, etc.

    What we need are two honestly-different political parties, and parties that have some actual principles. What we have are two sides of one party that each has a flock of lemmings believing that there are significant differences.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    zip, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 11:43am

    ACLU blog

    ACLU blog post:

    https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/victory-judge-releases-infor mation-about-police-use

    "The ACLU filed a motion asking the judge to unseal the transcript, citing the public’s First Amendment right of access to court proceedings. In response, the government tried to justify continued secrecy by invoking the federal Homeland Security Act and other federal laws. As the ACLU explained to the court, those laws have no bearing because this case involves state judicial records, and because the government has waived its ability to invoke broad secrecy arguments by already releasing significant information about its use of stingrays."

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    identicon
    rapnel, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 11:56am

    Because

    Because the other 99% of use cases are fucking illegal. That's why.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  5.  
    identicon
    zip, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 11:57am

    Trained To Kill: The Policing Tactics The Public Isn’t Supposed To Know About


    MINNEAPOLIS – On May 28, 126 police officers in Seattle filed a lawsuit in federal court, arguing that restrictions placed on the department by a federal court in 2012 regarding officers’ ability to use excessive force was a violation of their constitutional rights as officers.

    Although the restrictions were put in place by the feds to curb the rampant unconstitutional policing the city was experiencing — especially when it came to the use of excessive and deadly force against mostly minority suspects — the officers argue that having to restrain themselves while on duty only leads to an increase in the number of citizens and officers killed.

    In their 81-page filing, the officers specifically argue that they are often put in situations in which they have no choice but to overreact and use force. They also say that the current “impractical and burdensome” restrictions only “trap” officers and lead to an increase in misconduct violations.

    Represented by a Washington, D.C.-based former civil rights attorney, the lawsuit reportedly reflects the “political agenda and rhetoric from the virulently anti-reform police union, the Seattle Police Officers Guild,” and not necessarily the feelings of the Seattle Police Department itself. However, Ron Smith, president of the Seattle Police Officers Guild, says the union does not support the lawsuit.

    Still, the Seattle-based officers have continued to push for a federal judge to issue an injunction to freeze the use-of-force regulations, at least temporarily, as well as provide financial compensation for those officers who were improperly disciplined or lost wages for violating the use-of-force policies.

    http://www.mintpressnews.com/trained-to-kill-the-policing-tactics-the-public-isnt-supposed- to-know-about/191639/?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 11:57am

    The only reason the Federal government would be interested in this is because it exposes a huge hole in the legality of their own operations.

    In bits and pieces, it is starting to unravel just how illegal all this spying is. Court case after court case against the government and it's various branches, one bit here and one bit there is leaving it's unsavory actions out to air in public.

    The willingness to grant the government the unopposed right to determine on it's own what is a national security matter and what is an illegal matter is rapidly shrinking in view of the Snowden releases and one by one in various courts. It's only a matter of time before the card house falls. Question is can Obama and the various Congress critters get out of office ahead of being held responsible for their actions?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  7.  
    identicon
    Anonymoose, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 12:01pm

    Is there any way to build in some sort of authentication check into the phones, to prevent them from connecting to any random thing pretending to be a tower?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
    icon
    Ima Fish (profile), Jun 4th, 2014 @ 12:02pm

    "*only to find out that no such records exist"

    I've worked in courts long enough to be utterly perplexed by this. I can imagine the files being sealed and made non-public. But actually allowing the files to be removed?! What's the legal basis for that?!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  9.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 12:17pm

    Re:

    You're off topic. If you want to submit a story to techdirt, click the "Submit a Story' link on the top of the page.
    No offense intended, but I'm clicking the 'report' button on your post, and this one of mine as well in the hopes of getting them hid from the rest of the conversation.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  10.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 12:28pm

    Nice....

    How to become Dictator in a Republic or Democracy.

    Prevent the People from being able to sue the government by playing any of the below cards.

    National Security
    State Secret
    Confidential
    We signed NDA
    and...
    Screw you puny citizen....

    So far these are all working! So why should they stop playing them?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  11.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 12:44pm

    Add the US Marshal Service to the list of of SlimeBalls

    Does this really know no end?

    US Marshals, Why would you think this was a smart move? Way to damage your credibility. 1 more agency that has fallen down.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  12.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 12:46pm

    precedent setting?

    Does this really mean that any action can be taken against any person and the government does not have to admit to any wrongdoing as long as there is a terms of service agreement?

    Did the NAZI's have a TOS with the company that provided the ovens? Lets face it, they sure didn't want to talk about them.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  13.  
    identicon
    zip, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:01pm

    Re: Re:

    It's definitely on topic, a peripheral issue on the larger subject of police abuse.

    Since I'm sure that TC doesn't have the time to write a story about every instance of this topic (reader-submitted or not) so I thought a better way would be to include related topics of interest in the comments section, where they could be seen by everyone -- rather than ending up in a black hole.

    ... but then, it seems that a few of the Techdirt trolls might prefer these stories be banished to a black hole.

    Anyway, if Techdirt staff were to come out and say not to post related news links in the comments, then I'll stop.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  14.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:13pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    I found it worth knowing and on topic. Thanks for posting.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  15.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:31pm

    Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    Your main problem is that you only have two parties. A two party system in only 1 party better than a 1 party system.

    Your country would benefit from having multiple parties - that way more views could be expressed and it would diffuse/decentralize your power structure.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  16.  
    icon
    That One Guy (profile), Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:33pm

    Re:

    ...was a violation of their constitutional rights as officers.

    I must have missed that part, but where exactly does the Constitution specifically give cops rights citizens don't have?

    ...especially when it came to the use of excessive and deadly force against mostly minority suspects — the officers argue that having to restrain themselves while on duty only leads to an increase in the number of citizens and officers killed.

    Translation: The rules put in place to reduce the use of excessive and deadly force against suspects is somehow increasing the number of people killed. Because reasons.

    Oh, even more bluntly: 'We became cops so we could legally shoot at people, rules that restrict our ability to do so take all the fun out of it!'

    If they're going to make that claim, they really need to back it up with facts, and of particular interest would be how many officers and suspects were injured/killed before the rules were put into place, compared to how many are injured/killed afterwards.

    They also say that the current “impractical and burdensome” restrictions only “trap” officers and lead to an increase in misconduct violations.

    Translation: 'It's not our fault we keep breaking the rules, it's the fault of the rules!'

    Represented by a Washington, D.C.-based former civil rights attorney,

    'Former' apparently being the correct word here with a lawsuit like this.

    However, Ron Smith, president of the Seattle Police Officers Guild, says the union does not support the lawsuit.

    Talk about a pleasant surprise, even the police union in the area isn't supporting this, which just highlights how bad they think the lawsuit is.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  17.  
    icon
    That One Guy (profile), Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:36pm

    Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    I'd love to have the Pirate Party make a major showing in US politics, both because they seem to be a solid choice and hold reasonable stances from what I've seen, and because simply having a political party with 'Pirate' in the name would likely cause the *AA's and their pet politicians to spontaneously burst into flames.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  18.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:39pm

    Re: Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    I will bring the marshmallows to THAT roast!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  19.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:44pm

    Re: precedent setting?

    Clinton did it, Bush followed suit, and Obama is blowing the damn hinges off with it.

    Of course the local po-po's would see if they could get their friend the Marshall to do it for them too after their own attempt to pull it off failed! These guys play together and scratch each others back.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  20.  
    identicon
    Kronomex, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 1:54pm

    And so the US sinks ever deeper into fascism and totalitarianism while railing against regimes that are fascist and...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  21.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 2:01pm

    Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    Agreed, I envy parliamentary systems for their ability to support something other than a duopoly of political parties.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  22.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 3:00pm

    Re:

    As I see it, the real issue is that ever since "9/11", the government has taken the attitude that the ends justify the means. Legal, illegal, secret, not secret, etc, just doesn't matter because security is the only important thing. Look,,, we have secret laws, secret courts, secret prisons, secret mass internal surveillance, secret no-fly lists (which probably will eventually be expanded to other forms of transportation) and probably a lot of stuff we don't know about. We have state and local police being trained and equipped more like paramilitary forces. All in line with the ends justify the means.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  23.  
    icon
    John Fenderson (profile), Jun 4th, 2014 @ 3:31pm

    Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    I couldn't agree more! Unfortunately, the two parties have pretty much completely rigged the system to make it as close to impossible for a third party to be viable. Fixing that is incredibly important, but won't happen any time soon (and won't happen until some other things -- such as the money problem -- get fixed first.)

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  24.  
    icon
    John Fenderson (profile), Jun 4th, 2014 @ 3:34pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    I consider it off-topic, but not so far off as to warrant clicking the report button. Really, this should be a full story all by itself. It won't get the attention or commentary it deserves just sitting in a comment.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  25.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 5:09pm

    Re: Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    Is there any money problem that they aren't directly or indirectly responsible for causing and/or perpetuating? I can't think of anything.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  26.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 5:11pm

    Re: Re:

    Please don't call it "security". None of it makes the nation more secure.
    Call it what it is. "Tyranny".

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  27.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 5:32pm

    The U.S. Marshal Service is the legal custodian of any court order or warrant related document to this case regardless of it being in the hands of Sarasota. Therefore the ACLU is not entitled to the documents unless it files a FOIA request with the U.S. Marshals Service. The Sarasota officer was a temporary deputized person working under the authority and jurisdiction of the Marshals Service and is not an employee of the Service. The Service affords Sarasota and thousands of other departments the expertise of the Service's employees and the technology it employs to investigate fugitive cases. To protect investigative secrets the Marshals Service is perfectly in its right to seize the documents. Thanks have a great day.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  28.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 6:06pm

    Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    I truly believe that we would be better off with NO parties. Let the candidates stand on, and be responsible for their own platforms. Don't live up to your campaign promises, automatic removal from office, and lose the ability to run again.

    To accomplish this, all money must be removed from the system. Let the government fund elections, and control political advertising in the sense that they distribute, to candidates, the ability to run an equal number of ads as compared to their opponents (and then pay the bill), and no outside political advertising.

    There is absolutely no good reason the rich should be the only people to be able to run for office. There is no good reason a homeless person should not be able to run. Either should be able to articulate their positions, but beyond that it should be the voters choice, not some committee conferring their approval, not the size of a bank account.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  29.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 4th, 2014 @ 7:47pm

    Re:

    Troll or otherwise bought off person.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  30.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 1:38am

    They've all gone rogue! State governments and the federal government. They're all operating under secret laws, or in most cases, operating under no laws at all.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  31.  
    identicon
    model_robot, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 2:16am

    Re:

    Under what law?! That's preposterous. He was clearly operating as an officer of the city of Sarasota when obtaining the warrant and collecting the data.

    Also, reallly, a fugitive? Gotta act like there's a bogie man to justify trampling on our right to privacy.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  32.  
    identicon
    David, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 2:58am

    Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    What we need are two honestly-different political parties, and parties that have some actual principles.

    What you need is get your head out of your arse and look beyond the two parties corrupted beyond recovery.

    Remember the third-party doctrine: there is no reasonable expectation of privacy unless you vote for a third party.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  33.  
    identicon
    David, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 3:21am

    Re:

    Why would the US rail against fascism and totalitarianism? What they are fighting are regimes that try breaking the link between money and power.

    Representative democracies are providing a pretty wide distribution of corruptability distributed across a comfortably small set of decision makers. Being a billionaire consequently provides a respective level of comfort, security, influence and power rather than being ridiculous and meaningless.

    Communist, socialist and junta regimes are ok with the U.S.A. as long as they are corrupt enough to accept money and deliver returns for it, usually by exploiting their citizens and/or natural resources. So the U.S. is pretty fine with China while Cuba and some similar countries are rather frowned upon.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  34.  
    icon
    The Wanderer (profile), Jun 5th, 2014 @ 4:57am

    Re: Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    It might be possible to fix the two-party lockin without first fixing the money problem, by instead first switching to a Condorcet-satisfying voting system - i.e., one based on ranked preferences (with appropriate methods for comparing and evaluating those expressed preferences), rather than on "vote for only one".

    Unfortunately, the odds of that happening for any election higher than Mayor - without first fixing the overall locked-in political system, which is the goal of all this in the first place - are if anything potentially slimmer than those of getting the money problem fixed.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  35.  
    icon
    The Wanderer (profile), Jun 5th, 2014 @ 5:04am

    Re: Re:

    Translation: The rules put in place to reduce the use of excessive and deadly force against suspects is somehow increasing the number of people killed. Because reasons.

    Oh, even more bluntly: 'We became cops so we could legally shoot at people, rules that restrict our ability to do so take all the fun out of it!'
    I suspect the cited reasons would be "Because we can't use force as readily, criminals are able and willing to use force both against us and against law-abiding citizens, resulting in more of us and more of those law-abiding citizens being injured and/or killed.".

    This may even be true, though at this point I'd at least want to see statistics supporting it (and probably some of the studies underlying those statistics, as well). The next question would be what the tipping point / balance point of the tradeoff is, where the cost from an increase in the successful use of force by criminals becomes enough to outweigh the benefit of the reduction in excessive use of force by police.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  36.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 7:58am

    Re: Add the US Marshal Service to the list of of SlimeBalls

    They are just another agency in a bag of tricks to use against an ever growing number of enemies this and other governments must defend against.

    Can you imagine this kind of stuff going on _ on a nice planet? I pity the foo who thinks this kind of stuff will become the norm for long. But, the saddest part, whether we like it or not, is that we are all in this together.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  37.  
    icon
    John Fenderson (profile), Jun 5th, 2014 @ 10:33am

    Re: Re: Re: As we say in the South, 'bless your heart'

    "I truly believe that we would be better off with NO parties."

    I agree. As did some of the founding fathers, who overtly stated that the very existence of political parties poses a threat to the political system.

    Unfortunately, that's a utopian ideal, not actually possible in reality unless you're willing to violate our right of free association. In fact, it's so infeasible that the very founders who decried the concept of political parties went on only a few years later to form their own.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  38.  
    identicon
    GEMont, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 3:00pm

    Re:

    "It's only a matter of time before the card house falls."

    Unless the Fed can get another good old fashioned WAR going somewhere, and do the old "Look Over There" routine that always ends all investigations into wrong doings by the fed and its friends, because "enemies".

    Let's face it folks. They are protecting their own asses, because they've been breaking the laws and thumbing their collective noses at "your" constitution and at the laws of the land.

    My guess is that this is just another blackmail program and they simply have to keep the public from learning what they really do with all that surveillance data, because otherwise the cash cow dies.

    Remember. In an "ownership" society, the laws only pertain to the common (resource) citizens. The rulers and their control infrastructure personel are always exempt from such restrictions.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  39.  
    identicon
    GEMont, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 3:01pm

    Re:

    "What's the legal basis for that?!"

    Fascism

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  40.  
    identicon
    GEMont, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 3:07pm

    Re: Add the US Marshal Service to the list of of SlimeBalls

    Credibility is only important to those folks who actually answer to the public.

    Federal Agencies answer only to their federal masters.

    They couldn't give a shit what you; the public, thinks about them, or about anything else for that matter.

    You're just a resource and in most cases, the enemy of the state.

    Why would they care what the enemy thinks of them?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  41.  
    identicon
    GEMont, Jun 5th, 2014 @ 3:14pm

    Re:

    That's because there is very, very, little money in honesty, but organized crime via fascism promises everyone involved a huge payday every day, until the cash cow runs dry.

    You have allowed a society based on ruthlessness and self-aggrandizement to flourish and thrive, where only the most corrupt, self-serving and opportunistic individuals might rise to the top.

    What the hell did you expect would be the result??

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  42.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 7th, 2014 @ 12:03am

    The PrivacyCase uses military grade shielding technology to give you the ability to block unwanted intrusions into your cellular phone and wireless devices. By controlling when and where your phone can send and receive information, the PrivacyCase prevents remote activation, GPS location-tracking and real-time audio/video eavesdropping.

    Originally built to protect business and victims of domestic violence and stalking, from commercially available cell phone spyware. The PrivacyCase was designed to meet or exceed NATO EMSEC specifications.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  43.  
    identicon
    Reality bites, Jul 15th, 2014 @ 8:02pm

    Law Enforcement? more like rogue traitors with technology

    Every person involved in these obviously criminal eavesdropping should be in jail.

    You can always depend on the fed's to be true criminals but when the locals step out of line they need to be stomped hard.
    Defund the entire dept and rehire all over, blacklist the criminals and make sure they never work in security again.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  44.  
    identicon
    Reality bites, Jul 15th, 2014 @ 8:05pm

    Re: Treason is treason...... pitiful pathetic excuses don't change the crime

    The scumbag traitors committing the crimes need to pay.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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