Politics

by Carlo Longino


Filed Under:
copyright, isps, piracy, regulations, uk



UK Government To Force ISPs To Become Copyright Cops

from the whose-side-are-they-on? dept

Like other industry trade groups around the world, the British Phonographic Industry, that country's RIAA equivalent, has been pushing for British ISPs to become its copyright cops, something a number of ISPs have refused to do. After some threatening noises from British politicians, some ISPs relented, and now, the government is set go all the way by forcing the ISPs to play ball. The FT reports that a draft government report says that a new agency called the "Rights Agency" will be established, and it will oversee regulations forcing ISPs to inform customers who download copyrighted material that they're breaking the law, and keep tabs on their downloading activity, and turn these records over to record labels or other groups who get a court order for them. Apparently the government took these steps because the labels and ISPs couldn't come to an agreement on how to deal with file-sharing, and says its goal is to get the industries to share responsibility. It's not clear why the British government saw the need to intervene here, and when it says "share responsibility", it's not at all clear what it's asking the music business do to. To the contrary, all these regulations seem to do is put responsibility on ISPs to support the record labels' foundering business model. Will the British government take similar steps to protect all of the country's other failing businesses? Or do the record labels, for some reason, deserve this special treatment?

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  • identicon
    Thom, 19 Jan 2009 @ 8:38am

    Don't complain

    Best the British do it now - destroy their Internet providers, their people, their Internet economy, and finally their entertainment industry - so they can serve as an example to others. Otherwise we might be the ones doing that and serving as yet another example of how to fsuk up a nation.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      :Lobo Santo, 19 Jan 2009 @ 8:45am

      Re: Don't complain

      Being that they're British, they may just make a go of it and succeed--likely succeed at convincing their citizens to live elsewhere; or succeed at teaching their citizens all about Point-2-Point Encryption...

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Mark, 19 Jan 2009 @ 8:54am

      Re: Don't complain

      Comments like these cause me to think of those arrogant intellectuals who, in their condescending way, remind us that those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it.

      I find that idea funny because what I see most often is those who do know history being so arrogant that, instead of learning lessons from their predecessors mistakes, they'll repeat past acts believing they can do a better job. Instead they always make bigger mistakes and screw things up worse.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Arghhh, 19 Jan 2009 @ 10:16am

      Re: Don't complain

      Don`t say that! You`ll give our so called "elected Leaders" ideas!

      We want them out but they refuse to go.

      BTW UK really does suck to live in now. I can say that, i have to live here.

      Roll on Election 2009... Plz!

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    lavi d (profile), 19 Jan 2009 @ 8:43am

    Or do the record labels, for some reason, deserve this special treatment?

    Mike,

    I don't know if you've noticed, but in the last 15 years or so, it's become increasingly difficult for the world's remaining media moguls to make obscene profits selling various types of discs and tapes at blood-letting prices.

    So yes. Yes they do deserve special treatment and it would be refreshing if you were to start exhibiting a more sympathetic attitude towards their plight.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Analmouse Coward, 19 Jan 2009 @ 8:57am

    C*ck

    Looks to me like we have a excrement, fan collision here.

    I know after 10 years it'll finally get overturned by the law lords but until then......

    Any ideas if this is only music made in the UK or will it be a blanket ban, cos some (RIAA) might use this to effect you guys over the pond as well.

    And again, C*ck!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    AC, 19 Jan 2009 @ 9:10am

    Hey

    If we will do i for the banks and the rest of Europe why shouldn't the music industry get a look in?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    lavi d (profile), 19 Jan 2009 @ 9:18am

    (Sorry Carlo...)

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    mike allen, 19 Jan 2009 @ 9:57am

    this is spying beyound acceptability

    All British citizens should now support any one who will defend their right to privacy. and fight this stupidity with all the vemin they can obtain. oh hang on they are British and wont go against the nanny gov.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Arghhh, 19 Jan 2009 @ 10:22am

      Re: this is spying beyound acceptability

      That's the thing. The UK is relying on the EU (Gasp!), of all people to defend out right to privacy.

      As for fighting, we are loosing that battle. Do you fancy 42 days banged up with no charge, no legal assistance? Thats where the UK is headed.

      Can we borrow the US constitution? Not that its helped you lot much with "retrospective immunity for the Telco's" _OR_ the white houses "Missing Emails"

      Your ship is leaking as badly as ours :(

      Welcome to the New World Order.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        Peet McKimmie (profile), 19 Jan 2009 @ 11:27am

        Re: Re: this is spying beyound acceptability

        Do you fancy 42 days banged up with no charge, no legal assistance? Thats where the UK is headed.

        Can we borrow the US constitution?


        Hmmm. 42 days in a Police station or an unlimited time in Guantanamo...? Let's see...

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Paul G, 19 Jan 2009 @ 11:25am

    TOR

    Time to find out what it is all about.

    If it wasn't for the fact that I am old and broke I would emigrate because I am sick of this s**t hole that once used to be 'Great' Britain.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    The Arbiter (profile), 19 Jan 2009 @ 11:46am

    Yet another reason...

    Here is yet another reason Scotland needs to be free from England and it's bolluxed up law. http://www.scottishindependence.com/

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 19 Jan 2009 @ 8:03pm

    Rights Agency

    How Orwellian is that ?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Rob, 20 Jan 2009 @ 3:38am

    The problem with the UK is that the politicians read the book '1984' and thought it was a policy document that had to be implemented. At least that's the way it seems because each year we seem to get closer and closer to a 'Big Brother' state.

    Next step - censorship of the net.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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