DailyDirt: Storing Data On DNA

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

There are lots of ways to store information nowadays — from cloud services to nano-lithography to synthesizing custom strands of DNA. Some methods are cheaper or more convenient than others, but if physical space is really a premium, then encoding a gazillion bits of data on a few grams of DNA seems like the way to go. Here are just a few projects working on using DNA as an archiving medium.

If you’d like to read more awesome and interesting stuff, check out this unrelated (but not entirely random!) Techdirt post.

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Comments on “DailyDirt: Storing Data On DNA”

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12 Comments
Anonymous Coward says:

How about mining gold with bacteria, or making clothes with bacteria?

One can store data on bacteria DNA and manufacture clothes or bags to transport it.
https://biocouture.posterous.com/biocouture-on-tedcom

Now imagine some mad scientist producing a bacteria that can produce gold and store the geolocation of it in its DNA LoL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupriavidus_metallidurans
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delftia_acidovorans

Another mad idea is having the research about human vision integrated into DNA storage, imagine you tap into the optic nerve transforming the eyeballs into spycams and store those movies in your own DNA.

Now that would incredible 🙂

Sorry just having fun and letting the imagination go wild.

Michael Ho (profile) says:

Re: Re:

not sure where “Organic matter degrades over time unless it’s part of a living organism” comes from… because it’s not entirely true. Some organic matter is quite stable, depending on the conditions, and it doesn’t “need” to be part of a living cell. This is why we can recover DNA from (dead) fossils that is tens of thousands of years old… and why DNA is a reasonably good choice for molecular storage.

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