November 16th: American Censorship Day; Don't Let Congress Censor The Internet

from the take-a-stand dept

On November 16th, the House of Representatives will be holding hearings on SOPA, its bill to put in place all sorts of restrictions and regulations on the internet, at the behest of the big Hollywood studios, who have failed to adapt. The bill is nothing short of an attempt to censor the internet, creating — for the first time ever — the ability for the US government to flat out censor entire websites. The hearings on the 16th are completely stacked in favor of the bill. The sponsors of the bill can’t even stand to have a fair hearing and listen to those who are worried about the unintended consequences of the bill.

That’s why a bunch of websites have teamed up to declare November 16th: American Censorship Day. If you run a website, please sign up to participate, to help educate your users to the problems associated with the bill, and to urge them to express their concerns to Congress. Don’t let Congress build the Great Firewall of America while you sat back and did nothing.

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Comments on “November 16th: American Censorship Day; Don't Let Congress Censor The Internet”

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59 Comments
Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re: Re:

“Ooooo look, the apologists are doing a virtual Occupy Washington.”

Actually, it looks more like you woke up a sleeping giant from where I am sitting.

That’s a good one. You have the political equivalent of Larry, Curly and Moe (Wyden, Lofgren and Issa) as your allies in Congress. Too little, too late.

Planespotter (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re:3 Re:

There won’t be any winners, the legacy companies will still die off, it’ll just take a little bit longer.

Would be funny though if Sony uses SOPA to have Universal shut down over copyright infringement… I’m pretty sure they could make something up, not like they actually need evdience, or a court, or judge or even a jury.

arcan (profile) says:

Re: Re: Re: Re:

At least Wyden can stop the bills from getting through the senate for a while. as long as he can do that we got a chance. i would not be surprised if the whole idea of unanimous consent was designed for situations when a senator feels that the other side is so heavily bribed that they will no longer see reason. and yes i believe paying massive campaign contributions to congressmen so they will vote on your side is the same thing as offering them a bribe. it is nice that he still has a few more years

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re: Re:2 Re:

I’d like to think that at least some of the politicians in the US review this blog. I want them to know that what they do is important and that “We the people” are going to hold them accountable in some way.
While I personally don’t have the influence that the AA groups do, I do vote and I do get my friends and family involved.
I want content creators to get their $. I really do.
I just am not willing to give up on due process and freedom of speech (Because these things make our country somewhat unique.) to bow before these overlord wannabes.

Anonymous Coward says:

This will only work if big companies like Google & Youtube & Facebook & Ebay etc all agree to it, since they’re such massive and popular sites that people could hardly miss it if they did it for a day. Smaller sites unfortunately don’t really have the muscle to force this kind of stuff into the news and get the national attention needed to make a point and stop SOPA.

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re:

This will only work if big companies like Google & Youtube & Facebook & Ebay etc all agree to it, since they’re such massive and popular sites that people could hardly miss it if they did it for a day. Smaller sites unfortunately don’t really have the muscle to force this kind of stuff into the news and get the national attention needed to make a point and stop SOPA.

You may want to consider whether those companies are willing to spend all of their political capital in an uncertain effort to beat this back. It may come as a shock for you to learn that this may not be the single biggest issue in the lives of these companies. Most it won’t affect them as this bill targets foreign sites. The domestic component of SOPA isn’t worrisome to them at all.

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re: Re:

Except that Facebook China could be shutdown and censored, Google China can also, which is a good thing for China, Europeans also would rejoice if they could find a way to close the competition.

All big internet companies have foreign facing websites that can and will be included on the “foreign sites”.

That you are so dishonest that you need to lie is just sad.

Paul (profile) says:

Re: Re:

I have an idea for Google for November 16th:

G_____

…………………………
|……………………….|

Don’t know how the character graphics will look in your browser, but I t____ the old s_____ blanking out of key w____ applied to g_____ would get the m______ across b_________. Not only is it censorship, it also fails to prevent people from getting the information that the law would try to suppress.

out_of_the_blue says:

Meanwhile, web-wide TRACKING is a far worse threat.

Before I can even /see/ the proposed letter to be sent to Congress, this “pro-freedom” site puts up a form that requires effectively ID-ing oneself, AND promises to annoy you in future:
—————
(fields name): Address, City, State, Zip Code

“Fight for the Future will contact you about related campaigns, but we won?t share your email with anyone.”
—————

Anyone here stupid enough to give that away? It’s also indicative that front page has a link to “GeoIP service” (taking the link gets to a database for fee), so if you gave them the above, you’ve helped commercial enterprises to track and target you.

So it’s MONETIZING MIKE! Managed to “monetize” your opposition to SOPA, have you? What a SHAM you are.

Chris Rhodes (profile) says:

Re: Meanwhile, web-wide TRACKING is a far worse threat.

this “pro-freedom” site puts up a form that requires effectively ID-ing oneself

Unlike Big Content (who you shill for constantly), the opposition apparently is trying to get support from real people, and not just astroturfing through sock puppets with form letters. No wonder you have a problem with it.

Anonymous Coward says:

Re: Re: Meanwhile, web-wide TRACKING is a far worse threat.

if you look up the history of copyright it was actually used/created as a form of censorship

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20100810/02525810568.shtml
^ that’s not the first place i’ve seen it, but it’s the one i could find right now

so… yeah, i don’t think anyone who actually has a clue about copyright, i mean the REAL clue not the lies we’ve all had shoved down our throats by shills, is going to buy into that statement

Chilly8 says:

I wonder if the next step after SOPA might be to require a government license to use a VPN, like laws in Oman and Pakistan, even to access you office network from home.

As the government gets an order to block access to one VPN, more will show up in their place, or maybe even the shut down one will re-appear under a new name.

You watch, the government will be playing whack-a-mole trying to stop people from using VPNs to bypass the blacklist, which mayh well result in laws, like those in Pakistan and Oman, requiring a government license to use a VPN, to access your office network from home.

Anonymous Coward says:

Isn’t censorship illegal, because it is against the first amendment? “Congress shall make no law… abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” And if they would like to argue prior restraint, meaning the few vague restrictions on speech, they still don’t make internet censorship legal. Someone posting something on the internet is not equivalent to yelling “Fire!” in a movie theater. This is all just stupid… And by the way, if the supreme court doesn’t deem this unconstitutional, we all have the right to abolish this government and put better people into office. Just saying.

StupidCongress says:

Hm, Prohibition? 18th Amendment? 21st Amendment? Ring a bell?

I see that these congressmen fell asleep in history class when talking about the 1920s in school, huh. Go let them pass this fuckin’ bill and watch as they fried when Occupy Wall Street take a turn for violence- in fact, if I’m old enough, I might even join those guys.

History will repeat itself if idiots don’t learn from their mistakes.

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