Music Publishers Push LyricWiki Into Wikia's Arms

from the is-singing-along-without-a-license-the-next-to-go? dept

In August, we wrote how music publishers were suing lyrics sites (and their owners) for daring to “profit off the backs of songwriters.” That, of course, makes no sense. People go to find lyrics to music because they already like it and want to find out more about it and the creators behind it. It’s good advertising. And yet, publishers have been going after lyrics sites for years. Apparently, the guy behind LyricWiki worked out a deal whereby technically he’s shutting down LyricWiki (found via Fan History) but is instead rebuilding the project for Wikia (the company associated with Wikipedia). Wikia has purchased a license from the publishers. While it’s good that a lawsuit is being avoided and that the project will continue (sort of), it’s still rather troubling that the publishers were able to force LyricWiki into Wikia’s arms. Apparently, independently repeating lyrics of a song you like isn’t allowed unless you buy a license. Careful singing along… that’ll be next.

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Companies: lyricwiki, wikia

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Comments on “Music Publishers Push LyricWiki Into Wikia's Arms”

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15 Comments
Anonymous Coward says:

@harknell

You think that is absurd?
How about technology that will monitor how you use your devices and will charge you accordingly?

That is what some patents filled by sony and others do. They monitor how you transmit data inside your home and will charge you an “extra” for the privilege to see kummar on your bedroom.

And that is why consumers should change habits and start paying attention to what they get, if it is not under a liberal license don’t use it.

wvhillbilly (profile) says:

Re: @harknell

You think that is absurd?
How about technology that will monitor how you use your devices and will charge you accordingly?

For that very reason I try as much as possible to listen only to public domain music. I have a sizeable collection of Edison cylinder record MP3s downloaded from UCSB’s library which I play occasionally. Most of this stuff RIAA makes such a hullabaloo over isn’t worth listening to anyway.

But…any guesses how long before the RIAA succeeds in recapturing copyright on the entire public domain??

It’s all about greed, I say.

Raybone (profile) says:

Absolute Bullshit

really…I cant believe people kowtow so easily to these assholes. excuse my lang. but this pisses me off. I cant tell you how many times as a performer Ive looked up lyrics to toss a cool cover in my original sets, which gets the writer paid via licenses charged to the venues I play. Why make it hard? Do they want me to sing the wrong fukin words if i cant understand the original recording? Can they even collect for that? Costing THEM more?

This is America goddamit..Am i the only one left with a pair?

another mike (profile) says:

karaoke

You have no idea how embarrassing it is to request a song at the karaoke bar and not know the lyrics ahead of time. Or not being able to request the song you want because the radio stations don’t identify the songs they play anymore. You never hear the title or artist so if you can’t search by lyrics you’re stuck. These sites are a FSM-send.

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