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  • Oct 30th, 2015 @ 5:04pm


    Those are just minor details that will be worked out in deals down the road. I imagine that the first carrier to zero rate Youtube is going to grab a ton of subscribers from the others, considering the flagship phones are available from every carrier now and not just locked to AT&T or Verizon (in the US, at least).

  • Oct 28th, 2015 @ 6:43pm

    Re: Re: It's a shame

    Putting a bunch of professional archivists into this situation is absolutely ridiculous and a total abdication of responsibility by Congress itself (who frankly, is trying to pass the buck onto these guys only so Hollyweird can't shit a brick in their direction).

  • Oct 28th, 2015 @ 6:40pm

    Re: Re: Old game cracking

    That is the gist of it, and I believe they specifically mention games such as old MMOs & games with a multiplayer component, etc that require online authentication (such as a credential login). This is kind of good news, as it means customers who own those titles are free to modify their game software so it is in at least some working order, but since in the case of MMOs, etc, no specific mention or exemption was made for the server-side software, it remains a total no-no or gray area at best.

  • Jul 7th, 2015 @ 3:02pm

    Oh Verge...

    Yep, was going to say that myself - they've been BTFO on their own articles for journalistic mistakes (like asserting opinion as fact) so many times by their readers that they've now decided to close the comment section entirely.

    TBH, I stopped visiting that site ages ago due to such nonsense, and I don't foresee them maintaining readership levels by doing this, either.

  • May 19th, 2015 @ 3:31am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Is that legal?

    This is not necessarily correct - you can do so, but you can't provide the tools to do so nor inform others on how you did it (nor redistribute it, but that's the obvious one). 2010 exemption renewal in part: "Literary works, including computer programs and databases, protected by access control mechanisms that fail to permit access because of malfunction, damage, or obsoleteness."

  • May 14th, 2015 @ 5:08am

    Re: Watch out Verizon and AT&T

    That doesn't work everywhere, unfortunately, especially now that more and more owners of devices with any sort of wifi hotspot capability are disabling it or otherwise locking third parties out of using their signal. Something to do with all of those fancy laws appearing that hold wifi providers accountable for shit like kiddie porn and pirated material that transfer over their network.

  • Apr 9th, 2014 @ 7:53pm

    Re: Popcorn Time

    Not anymore, there isn't, their site says they are now closed for business.

  • Aug 17th, 2013 @ 5:56am

    Lavabit & evidence

    They are going to get him for destruction of evidence and obstruction of an ongoing investigation.

    There was a similar case locally a few years ago, where a small mom & pop ISP got into a bit of a bind because they swapped to newer equipment (a new database server). The regional drug task force and the DEA + FBI had "requested" they maintain the older server while they completed the investigation of someone running a rather large meth lab who happened to be a customer of their ISP.

    The new system they installed had software that was incompatible with the data formats they previously used for email and account storage, and when they swapped, the old stuff went "poof".

    Needless to say the owner barely got out of being jailed themselves, but did have to pay a rather large fine, perform community service, and was reprimanded by a judge.

  • Feb 6th, 2013 @ 12:09pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    To sum your response, and this entire thread, we shall use the following declaration:

    "AJ has Cognitive Dissonance with two delicious sides of Ad Hominem smothered with Appeal to Authority."

  • Oct 13th, 2011 @ 6:49am

    Some thoughts (as Wes Sumner)

    One of the ACs keeps carping on how PROTECT IP will somehow prevent payment processors, advertising networks, etc from working with these sites. This is patently untrue. What will happen instead, is that US-based payment processors, advertising networks, etc will lose business to ones that are not US-based, and in fact, more will simply crop up to serve this purpose.

    They also carped on the fact that part of the bill addresses non-domestic domains. What is the definition of a non-domestic domain? Can a domain that has content served from a CDN in Canada be considered non-domestic? What about one that has the main domain registered in say, Belgium, but has email or other services provided out of the US and the owners and all other parts of the site/operation are in the US? Is that a non-domestic domain then?

    How is this going to handle what may be infringing content posted to the European branch of Facebook for instance?

    There are many other questions to ask surrounding this bill, and the least of it involves "piracy" of any sort. Much of it involving censorship, prior restraint, restrictions on trade, due process, etc.

    I also wonder how countries like India will react when they find out their national sovereignty is impacted by a US law they had no say in (this law will impact legitimate business enterprises in other nations, of which those nations have the say over, not the US media content industry). What will the US do if these nations in turn decide they can seize US domains as they see fit? What would the US do, for instance, if an Indian pharmaceutical or chemical company successfully took the domain of Pfizer or DOW Chemical? What would they do if a Russian payment processing company successfully took the domain of Paypal?

    What happens if the root DNS servers hosted outside of the US unilaterally blackhole the entire IP address space of the US government because a foreign government wins a court judgement to do so in retaliation for their corporations being impacted by this bill?

    Something tells me this PROTECT IP act opens up a can of worms they are not expecting or are prepared to deal with, including the possibility of economic retaliations.

  • Aug 22nd, 2011 @ 7:55pm

    (untitled comment) (as Wes Sumner)

    Anti-vaxers make me LOL. Right before they make me shudder.

    There's been several investigative reports on PBS and the like about this bunch.

    They've basically put everyone else in danger is what it boils down to. In areas where there are "significant" numbers of anti-vaxers, diseases which are normally only still prevalent in the 3rd World are having outbreaks and killing people.

    Courts are also starting to prosecute these people if their children die from the preventable diseases. I believe criminal negligence and voluntary manslaughter were the latest successful charges brought against these nutjobs - anti-vax parents out in like Oregon or Washington State who let their daughter die because they refused to get her vaccinated.

    Pastafarians have more scientific evidence in support of the FSM being the Supreme Divinity than the anti-vax crowd have against vaccines.

    To be honest, vaccinations should be mandatory, period. I have no desire to live in a repeat of the age of Cholera, Yellow Fever, have my relatives go blind from measles, or have my son die because some jerkwad decided to be a DERP about a vaccination.

  • Aug 19th, 2011 @ 6:12am

    (untitled comment) (as Wes Sumner)

    I think what he is saying, is that certainly there are those religious individuals who can reason, such as Sir Isaac Newton or Galileo. On the converse side, religion tends to attract those who cannot reason properly, and results in such as "extremists", the KKK, The Inquisition, etc.

    This is the point I believe he was attempting to make.