marurun's Techdirt Profile

marurun

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  • Aug 05, 2022 @ 11:36am

    Maybe they won by losing

    Maybe the voters will reward them for getting the prison off their hands. The Feds will clearly do a better job and spend more money than they were willing to, and in the end they'll get a better, more secure facility without having to dirty their own hands. By being horrible people they've found the way to game the system!

  • Mar 23, 2022 @ 11:36am

    I really want to see some defense lawyer actually have an officer's sense of smell tested some time. Make them prove they can perform these superhuman feats that make for such preposterous pretext.

  • Mar 23, 2022 @ 11:31am

    Modeling expected behavior

    In a way Apple is modeling the kind of behavior they expect to see from other companies who don't want to pay the commission: don't do an end-run around the app store rules, just turn off purchasing. In the legal battles with Epic Apple has never contended that they opposed Epic not wanting to pay the commission, just that Epic's attempt to eat its cake and have it too was not a contractually legal way to do it. Apple is doing here what they have insisted Epic should do, for the very same reason.

  • Nov 29, 2021 @ 10:17am

    I'm getting a different takeaway from that language in the context of which it was made. Microsoft/Bethesda isn't taking ES6 away from any platforms, in part because it wasn't promised to any specific platforms. Existing games and pre-existing platform promises are not being withdrawn: Skyrim will continue to work on the billion platforms it already works on and games with platform commitments will not see those commitments change as a result of the acquisition of Bethesda. That's as much as I'm willing to take away from those statements. There is explicitly no promise in any of those quotes to support any specific non-Microsoft platform.

  • Sep 03, 2021 @ 07:53am

    Re:

    The reason is that early on, the machine or computing device was the big invention and the programming method was seen as grunt work. Women did the "boring" work of programming while the men did the "exciting" work of inventing the next big new machine. It wasn't until programming started being seen as something worth doing that would generate money and plaudits that men started moving into the field and alienating women. There are also the traditional barriers to women in some branches of academia. Computer science and programming, often being an offshoot of math, and now also potentially being an offshoot of certain management programs, is a field largely dominated by men in academia. So it really was the good-ol-boys club that drove women out. At the time programming was starting to become more important men had even more social capital than they do now and as they worked their way into the field they started erecting barriers to women.

  • Sep 03, 2021 @ 07:47am

    Re: Discomfort, Bras, Men, Etc.

    Or it was that many men don't care about bras and see that as a "woman thing" and as such, tune right out. "A woman talking about bras? NEXT!"

  • Sep 03, 2021 @ 07:39am

    Re: It has to do with projection

    This is a rather tortured analogy and as a result I'm not actually sure what point you're trying to make. Football is inherently oppositional (opposed teams competing) and association with a team (or interest in the sport at all) is purely volitional. And you're using this to make some comment about tribalism based on inherent qualities of identity which are not in opposition and not in the least bit voluntarily-assumed? You've used a lot of words to make a point that's as clear as mud.

  • Jun 11, 2021 @ 07:03am

    Re: Re: Mixed evidence for performance impact

    Consoles have their own varieties of built-in DRM, but consoles are also not multi-use devices in the same way PCs are. I'm not sure whey Denuvo still has a market given its questionable efficacy, but at the same time all the doom and gloom about it "infecting" PCs and hurting performance is at least partially hyperbole.

  • Jun 10, 2021 @ 10:25am

    Mixed evidence for performance impact

    This is perhaps adjacent to WHY publishers include and then remove Denuvo, but there is mixed evidence of a performance impact on games by Denuvo software inclusion. ExtremeTech found an impact on 3 games at the end of 2018, but Ars Technica found no significant impact on Batman: Arkham Knight and TechPowerUp found no significant impact on Devil May Cry 5, and both of those were in early 2019. Now, Denuvo is constantly being updated and I'm sure each different revision has differing impact, and there are probably better and worse ways to implement it. Regardless, it's clear that developers are willing to gamble in the hopes of getting a week or two of piracy-free sales and distribution, even if that gamble often doesn't play out.

    https://www.extremetech.com/gaming/282924-denuvo-really-does-cripple-pc-gaming-performance

    https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2019/09/ars-analysis-denuvo-drm-doesnt-slow-down-batman-arkham-knight/

    https://www.techpowerup.com/review/denuvo-performance-loss-test/3.html

  • Nov 05, 2020 @ 08:51am

    SciHub IS a problem

    I have no love for the conventional publishing economy controlled by massive publishers, but SciHub isn't the right answer. SciHub routes around those behemoths but doesn't fix the fundamental problem.

    Preprints are only valuable, really, after the final article has passed peer review and been edited, because then the content that debuted in the preprint can be weighed using the published end-result. While publishers don't pay for peer review, and often don't pay for some of their editing, they do help organize everything and provide that network (to an extent). How this control is used to leverage massive profits is a big problem, but without that peer review and editing there's simply too much academic literature to process. This constant glut of literature is part of the Publish or Perish paradigm which needs to be eliminated at our universities.

    SciHub would have little to no value without those reviewed and edited final works. The question then becomes how do we make scientific research accessible equitably and still provide a healthy and robust peer review process and the necessary editing and publishing required to reach readers? What we have now is clearly a big problem, but SciHub isn't the solution. What we need is something else.

  • May 03, 2012 @ 06:47pm

    Re: Re: Sadly the exact opposite is almost always true.

    That quote, out of context, appears to be a reversal, but what I've read elsewhere is that Jobs called Android a stolen project because Google was heavily involved with Apple, including having a seat on Apple's board, while they were in early planning and development of Android. It wasn't as much about copying Apple's ideas as it was doing it as an insider and a partner, thus betrayal of trust and whatnot.

  • May 03, 2012 @ 06:47pm

    Re: Re: Sadly the exact opposite is almost always true.

    That quote, out of context, appears to be a reversal, but what I've read elsewhere is that Jobs called Android a stolen project because Google was heavily involved with Apple, including having a seat on Apple's board, while they were in early planning and development of Android. It wasn't as much about copying Apple's ideas as it was doing it as an insider and a partner, thus betrayal of trust and whatnot.