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  • Jan 20, 2022 @ 09:27am

    Re: Re:

    You do realize that they were not interested in certifying these altimeters until they literally had no choice. The only reason that the telcos are delaying the rollout of low band 5G is because the FAA promised them to use that time to run the tests. Keep in mind that according to themselves the FAA has been certifying altimeters at a pace of almost 9% of airplanes using them per day since they started (Jan 12th first announcement of testing/certifying, Jan 19th 62% passed).
    They could have done this two years ago when the FCC opened this spectrum auction for comments. Heck even three months ago would still have worked. Just finding one type not being able to handle anything in a 220-400 MHz guard band would have put the kibosh on opening up the 3800 MHz - 4200 MHz band until the FAA could state that all those are replaced.

  • Jan 20, 2022 @ 09:16am

    Re: Blowing smoke

    I apologize for the reverse order but it just happened. You do realize that your entire rant is based on functional spectrum licensing.
    Without it anyone could run whatever they want on for example the frequencies that are used by altimeters next to an airport and transmit whatever garbage they want. Also yes you are technically right that the radio spectrum is infinite.
    I doubt however that we'll ever see phones or radios or altimeters working on kilometer wave bands. The reason for this being time. The higher the frequency the more data that can be transmitted per unit of time. So that turns the physic version of infinity into something between the 100+ MHz bands and the start of the micro wave spectrum.
    Then physics interferes again. The higher the frequency the lower the effective range for the power put in the signal. And then you get things like the upper band for 5G (24 GHz- 39 GHz) getting absorbed by glass, some building materials. And even if that is left out, so completely open field you end up with theoretical range of 2 KM at most, realistically it is half of that at 1 KM. And in larger cities you might see an effective range of less then 100 M.
    Currently the optimal window for cell phone towers due to this is between 500 MHz and 8 GHz. Not quite infinite, especially since there is a data per time unit limit. There are more uses for said spectrum then there is spectrum. Thus it is a scarce good. And then that Orwellian the FAA did do something, the FCC didn't.
    Funny that you consider behaving like Chicken Little until it is clear that the n78 frequency band will be used by mobile phones as doing something. Remember that the FAA only started on Jan 12th 2022 (thanks for that link BTW, it doesn't really support you though) testing altimeters. They should have done that 2 years ago when the FCC started doing something, and that something was opening up the comments about opening up this spectrum for mobile phone use. After which in an abundance of caution they more then doubled the initial guard band. But like a buddy of mine said "I get fired from my job if I can't design devices that get interference from a 50 MHz guard band, let alone 200 MHz.", and he doesn't work for the military or plane industry. You are right about the EU though, they only use n77 at the moment which stops at 3800 MHz. But from the rest of your rant I'm guessing that that is merely to obfuscate that over 100 countries (the EU accounting for 27) are already using the n77/n78 band some of which did open the spectrum up to 4100 MHz. Oh and a few skipped right over the altimeter reserved frequencies to the n79 band (4400 MHz - 5000 MHz) on the other side to use that as well.
    There is one more major difference between the EU and the USA. USA cell towers are allowed to emit a signal 50% stronger then EU cell towers, except in the area around an airport.

  • Jan 20, 2022 @ 08:33am

    Re: Re: Blowing smoke

    Well that is still the FAA to blame.
    They thought they could win this turf fight with the FCC without ever bringing any proof of their side while the people on the FCCs side went "This is how reality works, what you claim is fantasy".
    As a result they only announced they started testing altimeters on Jan 12th. And by Jan 19th 62% of planes was using a tested altimeter.
    They could have done that when the FCC opened this for comments and if they'd found even one iffy type of altimeter it would have stopped opening these frequencies until that one was replaced.

  • Jan 18, 2022 @ 08:11am

    Re: Re: Blocking

    Phone companies cannot simply block calls from internet VoIP gateways.
    The loss in revenue would impact the stock price and thus get the people who suggest such a block fired.

  • Oct 29, 2021 @ 08:39am

    Better target.

    Dang since when can you create empty comments by hitting enter in the subject bar.
    Anyhow. I know a target that can cause more confusion due to selling actual ice cream.

    Sold by Blizzard: https://www.wowhead.com/item=140679/nevermelt-ice-cream.

    That would fit the name confusion better then an office supplier selling water.

  • Oct 29, 2021 @ 08:37am

    Better target.

  • Aug 27, 2021 @ 12:18pm

    Why others don't do this?

    I am failing to see a single downside for Bethesda to any of this, making me wonder yet again why other companies ever do it differently than this.

    Fear, plain and simple fear.
    Fear to lose control over their intellectual property. Fear of having missed something in the mod that they consider damaging to their brand. Fear of having missed something in the mod that someone else considers damaging to their brand. Fear of getting sued, for whatever reason, due to the mod in addition to or instead of the modders. Fear that the mod is better then the original product and raises the bar on what to produce next. Fear of that if a mod is free (aside from having to buy the original) they can't charge as much or anything at all for expansions. Fear that people keep playing the old while they want them to buy the new. It is fear all the way down, not turtles.

    So it boils down to not daring to take even the tiniest risk out of fear.

  • Jun 11, 2021 @ 10:13am

    Re: Re: Re: Cut-n-Paste

    Forgot to add, this solves 99% of the websites, there are a few more exotic ones out there that do not depend on scripting to disable right clicking. Or have additional measures above and beyond scripted blocking.

  • Jun 11, 2021 @ 10:03am

    Re: Re: Cut-n-Paste

    You are right that there are more solutions.
    Anything that goes after Javascript (NoScript for example) works but I do suggest an add-on like JoeCool suggested since those are more targeted then nuking all Javascript. examples for the 5 most popular browsers on PC:
    Safari - Right Click.
    Chrome - Absolute Enable Right Click & Copy.
    Edge - Allow Right-Click.
    FireFox - Absolute Enable Right Click & Copy.
    Opera - Allow Right-Click.

  • Feb 16, 2021 @ 10:49am

    Re: Big Time

    Well they claim they won't employ cancel culture this time instead they'll use a trolling filter and "viewpoint neutral" moderation performed by a combination of machine learning (I refuse to call this stuff AI) and human moderators. The trolling filter will most likely replace the "You start banned until you prove your right wing credentials." filtering they did to hide messages from anyone not rabidly right wing.
    The quotes around neutral viewpoint since they will most likely go with what they've always done and claim their right wing opinions are what the center wants and thus neutral.

  • Feb 16, 2021 @ 10:14am

    People have already been doing some digging and it seems that CloudRoute setup SkySilk. Whois for SkySilk list the e-mail of the owner of CloudRoute as a contact for example. Then there is the quality of CloudRoute. Over half the traffic it generates is considered coming from scammers or worse. Further I'd take the NPR report claims by them with a grain of salt. They'd be back on AWS if they had really taken those measures and proven they were doing so. And they wouldn't have fired the old CEO for suggesting they'd do exactly what they claim they are going to do for moderation. More likely it is that everything on there should be filtered by adding :"If we consider it.", "When we determine" or "You cannot prove we are lying now". It would also explain why they didn't restore the messages. To easy to point out that they were spouting bullshit if for example the vast majority of the messages related to Jan 6th weren't scrubbed, while scrubbing those would alienate the rubes they are trying to bilk.

  • Feb 16, 2021 @ 10:14am

    People have already been doing some digging and it seems that CloudRoute setup SkySilk. Whois for SkySilk list the e-mail of the owner of CloudRoute as a contact for example. Then there is the quality of CloudRoute. Over half the traffic it generates is considered coming from scammers or worse. Further I'd take the NPR report claims by them with a grain of salt. They'd be back on AWS if they had really taken those measures and proven they were doing so. And they wouldn't have fired the old CEO for suggesting they'd do exactly what they claim they are going to do for moderation. More likely it is that everything on there should be filtered by adding :"If we consider it.", "When we determine" or "You cannot prove we are lying now". It would also explain why they didn't restore the messages. To easy to point out that they were spouting bullshit if for example the vast majority of the messages related to Jan 6th weren't scrubbed, while scrubbing those would alienate the rubes they are trying to bilk.

  • Feb 11, 2021 @ 02:29pm

    Re:

    Blegh I hate markdown. Just because I didn't do a space or double space after a quote it continued despite my comment not being marked with a >

  • Feb 11, 2021 @ 02:27pm

    Needless to say, there's a growing roster of companies and broadband co-ops that also aren't particularly keen on Elon Musk getting money that could be going to truly struggling local broadband providers, many of which operate on highly restrictive budgets, and are deploying actual fiber connections

    Can I go conspiracy theorist on this? No matter here it is:
    Seeing that the process is broken (as claimed earlier) the majority of the money wasn't meant for them. They are just being used as a smokescreen by the usual suspects who are now complaining that someone managed to get the money that was meant for them.

  • Nov 20, 2020 @ 12:35pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Like I wrote common parlance
    Or if you don't like that I've got another definition:
    Insanity is an overarching description of behavior by an individual or group that is characterized by abnormal* mental or behavioral patterns. *Abnormal behavior is not to be confused with unusual/unexpected behavior. As an example Trumps behavior when he sharpied over that hurricane map.

  • Nov 18, 2020 @ 11:41am

    Re:

    It just so happens that Trump has Narcissistic Personality Disorder which is considered a mental illness or in common parlance he is insane.

  • Nov 18, 2020 @ 05:49am

    Re: Re:

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/11/17/trump-fires-dhs-cybersecurity-chief-who-led-election-defense-437174 skip down to the header : A focus on election security

  • Oct 09, 2020 @ 06:18am

    Re:

    Ugh Why did the flipping mark down continue after I skipped a line?

  • Oct 09, 2020 @ 06:17am

    Mike Masnick wrote:

    Governments around the world are going to pay for any vaccine because it's necessary and the boost to any economy is going to be well worth making the developers of a vaccine very, very wealthy.
    Not if they make the vaccine that is being developed by Oxford/AstraZeneca. The method for making that one will be available to all who want to produce it as long as the resulting product is sold at cost. I do have to say that that the last time I checked this is one of the reasons that no producer in the US has taken up the offer.

  • Aug 27, 2020 @ 09:08am

    Zip bombing? Good grief that was the kind of 'prank' I played in 1995. Sending a 16 KB archive, without password, through the school servers, crafted to extract to 4 GB worth of ones. Minor reaction to them opening any archive without password and deleting the ones with. These days there are mitigation strategies to prevent the computer processing it from running into memory/processor time issues.
    Same thing with the second prong of my little protest where the mail account I sent it to (and from) would forward this specific archive back to the sender twice (Just to make sure that the e-mail servers would crash from running out of space). There are mitigation strategies for that little prank as well these days.

    Yes I did not like them deleting archives because they were password protected and me failing a course due to that.

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