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  • May 25th, 2018 @ 7:03pm

    Re:

    I like it, but how do you prove it? Or a better question might be, did Alexa enjoy it?

  • May 25th, 2018 @ 6:59pm

    Privacy first, income second

    I have gotten a bunch of those emails about changes in different organizations privacy policy. The problem, as I see it, is that they basically all want to tell us about what they collect and how they use it. The problem with that is that they collect it and use it.

    I understand that there are many free functions available on the Internet, and that those functions are funded by making use of information collected. That information goes to advertisers, companies that want to advertise, and other groups with possibly more nefarious motives.

    I don't have an answer, but I bet someone will...eventually. Private information should remain private. Just because you connect to some website, they should not be able, or willing, to vacuum up every tidbit they can. I understand that this was the most available and lucrative source for income, to date, but there has to be a better way, or better ways. If we take away the ability to collect personal data, and here I am not talking about just the internet, but also those loyalty cards at the grocery stores, and your credit card data, and your phone data, etc., then the economy will change... a lot. But, I bet that 'they' will find a way to fund their operations.

    Yes there will be fallout in the process of changing over to some new way to fund some sites, a.k.a creative destruction. But I bet, in the long run, there will be fewer scam sites and more quality in the things we see on the Internet as those organizations find ways to 'connect with fans and give them reasons to buy' or maybe, even maybe more importantly, they find advertisers who value the message or service and THEY support the sites, which would be sending the 'buy' part in another direction, a supporter rather than a user. I don't pretend to know the final answer. I do know that I don't appreciate all this collecting.

    Do I use sites that, at least in theory (I do do things to block them), use my private information? Yes. Will I continue to? Yes. Do I want them to change. Also YES.

  • May 25th, 2018 @ 6:59pm

    Privacy first, income second

    I have gotten a bunch of those emails about changes in different organizations privacy policy. The problem, as I see it, is that they basically all want to tell us about what they collect and how they use it. The problem with that is that they collect it and use it.

    I understand that there are many free functions available on the Internet, and that those functions are funded by making use of information collected. That information goes to advertisers, companies that want to advertise, and other groups with possibly more nefarious motives.

    I don't have an answer, but I bet someone will...eventually. Private information should remain private. Just because you connect to some website, they should not be able, or willing, to vacuum up every tidbit they can. I understand that this was the most available and lucrative source for income, to date, but there has to be a better way, or better ways. If we take away the ability to collect personal data, and here I am not talking about just the internet, but also those loyalty cards at the grocery stores, and your credit card data, and your phone data, etc., then the economy will change... a lot. But, I bet that 'they' will find a way to fund their operations.

    Yes there will be fallout in the process of changing over to some new way to fund some sites, a.k.a creative destruction. But I bet, in the long run, there will be fewer scam sites and more quality in the things we see on the Internet as those organizations find ways to 'connect with fans and give them reasons to buy' or maybe, even maybe more importantly, they find advertisers who value the message or service and THEY support the sites, which would be sending the 'buy' part in another direction, a supporter rather than a user. I don't pretend to know the final answer. I do know that I don't appreciate all this collecting.

    Do I use sites that, at least in theory (I do do things to block them), use my private information? Yes. Will I continue to? Yes. Do I want them to change. Also YES.

  • May 25th, 2018 @ 6:27pm

    To begin with, requisite

    https://xkcd.com/1998/

    And...it seems he got it all right.

  • May 25th, 2018 @ 6:04pm

    Re: Re: Uhm, no, once instance isn't justification of paranoia

    Not really. If it doesn't get discussed, then it won't get fixed. Fixed is a long way off, but we will never get there if we don't discuss it. Every journey starts with a single, or maybe multiple steps.

  • May 25th, 2018 @ 6:02pm

    Re: Re: Meh...

    Just how do we know the surveillance organizations don't have access to that data? The NSA, for one, has no compunction about violating...anyone.

  • May 25th, 2018 @ 5:26pm

    Re:

    I am much of the same mind, except for WiFi. For that I use a 64 digit randomly selected password comprised of lowercase, uppercase, and numbers (my router (Tomato OS) did that for me). Rather than trying to type it, I use copy and paste for those few devices I allow access (though I had to type it into my HP printer until it became impossible to get ink for that, and it got tossed). Some devices don't allow for a 64 digit password, my Roku for example, so it doesn't get used anymore.

  • May 25th, 2018 @ 5:04pm

    Re: Uhm, no, once instance isn't justification of paranoia

    What the article, nor Amazon, nor Microsoft, nor any other company that runs digital assistants with always on microphones is how much of the conversations they hear they collect, keep, and analyse. Asking them wont help either.

  • May 24th, 2018 @ 8:02am

    Re: Re: Re:

    I'm not so sure about that. Trump may not be so dumb as he appears and behaves the way he does as a method to achieve some end. His supporters like the end they think he is trying to achieve and sincerely hope that the end achieved is the end they want. In that, I am not so sure either. This method may backfire...big time. It may also be that the end Trump is looking for is not the end he has convinced his supporters he is going after. Either way, I will not be surprised.

    The hard part will be cleaning up the mess he is making after he is out of office, whenever and however that happens.

  • May 24th, 2018 @ 7:43am

    Re:

    "Lets just watch the shit show spiral & wait for that day the industry comes begging for a government bail out because they are going broke."

    That 'going broke' analysis will be based upon the current annual/quarterly reports as the prior year/quarters money will have been banked/paid out as salary, bonus, dividend. The major stockholders will have been warned in advance (surreptitiously of course) so that they might take short positions on their stock holdings.

  • May 23rd, 2018 @ 7:45am

    Re: Re:

    I imagine that Pai would count those comments that support his agenda, real or fake, and then the underlying data would be destroyed by a 'malfunction' of some sort. His public statement would be a gushing proclamation of how the public supports 'the program', and um, er, sorry about the data loss, it was inevitable, ahh unavoidable, I mean 'unintentional'.

  • May 21st, 2018 @ 7:19pm

    Suggestion

    Personally I am not interested in the physical card game. I don't know anyone who would play it with me. Yeah, my local friends are a bit sluggish.

    But, how about an online, browser based, multiplayer version?

  • May 21st, 2018 @ 7:14pm

    Re: 'How dare they not pay for for two seconds of my illegal art!'

    Exactly! And what would the artist say when the dumpster got repainted, or had graffiti removing chemicals applied? He defaces someone else's property and then wants protection for his 'art'?

    As to the trademark, did he actually apply for a trademark? Was that mark being used in commerce? What markets did that mark apply to? Why did the court not take notice of the application of trademark rules and how they apply to this case?

  • May 18th, 2018 @ 7:25pm

    Gollum speaks again...

    ...and the only rant he failed to emit was about the ring.

  • May 18th, 2018 @ 3:53pm

    NJ...The Garden State

    Is there some kind of gas leak we should be aware of, or perhaps some sort of underground radiation resting just under this legal team's offices?

    One never knows. It is New Jersey.

  • May 18th, 2018 @ 7:24am

    Newspapers

    It is my understanding that British newspapers run pictures of naked female breasts, at times. Is this considered porn? Will one have to buy and then use a key to read those newspapers? Will the newspapers need to implement the ability to accept the key in their print editions? Will the 'unlocked' print edition, when thrown in the trash, obliterate those terrible, terrible pictures? Is there anything in those pictures that any child who has been breast fed hasn't seen before?

    /s

  • May 17th, 2018 @ 7:50pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Wouldn't this presume that there was something either illegal or incriminating to begin with? Just keeping your private information private shouldn't actually be illegal.

    Oh, I understand that the government would totally interpret this in their favor, whether reasonable or not, so letting them know how you prepared for your trip would not be wise.

  • May 17th, 2018 @ 1:42pm

    Exceptions and harm

    Beyond the (in my perspective) unconstitutional border zone exceptions (I don't mind them searching bags or containers or given the right circumstances people, but cell phones, tablets, computers?), I still have difficulty with the idea that a cell phone might cause someone harm. It might contain information that the owner of that phone might be planning some harm to someone at some point in the future, but the phone itself causing harm? If there is likelihood that the phones owner has some criminal intent, then the authorities should have some inkling due to past behavior or associations that would lead them to such a position. That comes from doing investigative work (something that appears to be anathema to law enforcement these days). Then they would have probable cause and be eligible for a warrant. Which I will admit takes some, though not much, effort.

    The better reasoning is that they are on a fishing expedition with no clue as to what they are actually looking for. Oh, and when they find 'something' the twisting and turning to make that 'something' into something nefarious is often comedic in nature.

    It seems to me that there are reasons beyond the simpering excuses proffered by the government in the above case, that they don't, and likely won't mention. Those reasons might actually get them in trouble. Also, they are not in the peoples interest. The governments interest yes, our interest no.

  • May 17th, 2018 @ 12:57pm

    Re: Re: Shrug.

    First I've heard of a Canooter valve. Where I grew up there were often references to a Johnson rod though. They were a bitch to find, parts store after parts store, and the funny thing was, they always kept a straight face. -:)

  • May 17th, 2018 @ 10:55am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    In a legal contract between say a writer and a publisher, both need some control. The publisher needs to be able to protect its interests while doing those things needed to get the work out to the public (admittedly less costly today unless they still use a printing press) and the author needs some protection as well. In the past this was a contract that returned royalties, but gave up the copyright. I submit that there should be a way for the author (in this example) to retain the copyright, get the royalties, yet also protect the interests of the publisher. I am unaware of such a vehicle.

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