allengarvin 's Techdirt Comments

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  • No, Your Kid Isn't Growing Horns Because Of Cellphone Use

    allengarvin ( profile ), 20 Jun, 2019 @ 10:30pm

    Grrr

    Dammit, I've been increasing my mobile usage the last 6 hours in an attempt to speed my horn growth.

  • Self-Described Feminist Loses Lawsuit Against Twitter For Banning Her Account

    allengarvin ( profile ), 20 Jun, 2019 @ 11:51am

    Re: "Stone" admits wishes to be RULED by corporations!

    Corporations are not "persons" as defined in the Constitution This supposition is broadly wrong. Corporations are legal persons under the law, both at the time of the adoption of the constitution, and now. See Blackstone's final chapter, that uses that literal term in the first paragraph. And more broadly, under US federal law, the Dictionary Act states:
    the words “person” and “whoever” include corporations, companies, associations, firms, partnerships, societies, and joint stock companies, as well as individuals And, see the 1819 Supreme Court case, Dartmouth College v. Woodward, which established that corporations enjoy some of the rights of persons under the constitution (in particular property and contract rights). Where it makes sense, corporations have always been people in the US.

  • Today In Bananas Copyright Law: Court Urged To Rule That A Banana Costume Is Not Infringing

    allengarvin ( profile ), 28 Apr, 2019 @ 03:53pm

    This is my banana!

    This is my banana. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My banana is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. Without me, my banana is useless. Without my banana, I am useless. I must peel my banana true. I must peel faster than the monkey who is trying to steal my bananas. I must eat it before he eats it.

  • Catholic School Teen's Lawyers File $250M Defamation Suit Against The Washington Post; Fail To List Any Actual Defamation

    allengarvin ( profile ), 22 Feb, 2019 @ 07:11pm

    libel per se

    Uh, no. No, it doesn't. Or, well, libel per se eliminates the burden of proof that the statement is damaging, which is slightly accurate, but libel against a private individual emphatically does not.

  • Catholic School Teen's Lawyers File $250M Defamation Suit Against The Washington Post; Fail To List Any Actual Defamation

    allengarvin ( profile ), 22 Feb, 2019 @ 07:06pm

    Re: racism

    But it doesn't matter for defamation--calling or implying someone is racist is not a statement of fact. It's an opinion. You need false statements of fact to sustain a defamation claim. That's sorely lacking here.

  • Catholic School Teen's Lawyers File $250M Defamation Suit Against The Washington Post; Fail To List Any Actual Defamation

    allengarvin ( profile ), 22 Feb, 2019 @ 07:00pm

    Re: False light defamation

    False light defamation has a higher standard of proof than public figure defamation. They'll have a devil of a hard time making that stick.

  • Rep. Louie Gohmert Wants To Strip Section 230 Immunity From Social Media Platforms That Aren't 'Neutral'

    allengarvin ( profile ), 28 Dec, 2018 @ 02:24pm

    Re:

    Well, the CDA modified the 1934 Communications act--explicitly. It's considered part of it now.

    See: http://transition.fcc.gov/Reports/1934new.pdf

  • Twelve Rules For Not Being A Total Free Speech Hypocrite

    allengarvin ( profile ), 26 Sep, 2018 @ 06:44pm

    Re: Read the list first, saved much time. I have never sued a cat.

    A) REALLY suspicious of anyone who says this. Do you know the history of common law? It was so cruel that in the 18th century hundreds of crimes resulted in the death penalty. The courts of chancery were introduced to grant some small, very small measures of leniency.

    And, there is no federal common law. Federal law derives exclusively from the constitution.

  • California DMV Rejects 1NFOS3C Vanity Plate Because Of 'Sexual Connotation'

    allengarvin ( profile ), 17 Oct, 2016 @ 06:53pm

    Lucky

    Guess I was lucky the Texas DMV didn't deny my plate for being sinful.

    http://plover.net/~agarvin/chupacabra.jpg

  • Judge Says No Way To Attorneys General Looking To Block IANA Transition

    allengarvin ( profile ), 30 Sep, 2016 @ 06:59pm

    Re:

    They even granted a monopoly on adult-related TLDs to a single registry (ICM), with rules on what kinds of content is allowed on them

    Uh, yeah, because .xxx is a Sponsored TLD. Use policies are not only allowed, they're expected by the nature of STLDs. ICANN is not regulating any content here; they've created a TLD where the sponsor is expected to develop its own use policies consistent with the proposed nature of the TLD.

    The process for authorizing STLDs is pretty transparent: https://archive.icann.org/en/tlds/stld-apps-19mar04/

    If that doesn't worry you

    It doesn't.

  • Easily Hacked Tea Kettle Latest To Highlight Pathetic Internet Of Things 'Security'

    allengarvin ( profile ), 23 Oct, 2015 @ 03:06pm

    Re: Don't let strangers in your network (IoT device === stranger)

    "using WPA-2 Enterprise, combined with a RADIUS server would work. (I'm not a network guy, just paranoid enough to learn)"

    Very very few consumer devices support 802.1x. I wish they did. I hate having a single PSK for the devices on my network that are probably the least secure. I isolate them and apply strict ingress and egress rules for traffic to them.

  • Easily Hacked Tea Kettle Latest To Highlight Pathetic Internet Of Things 'Security'

    allengarvin ( profile ), 23 Oct, 2015 @ 02:58pm

    Uh...simple question:

    "If you haven’t configured the kettle, it’s trivially easy for hackers to find your house and take over your kettle," Munro says. ... "I send two commands and it discloses your wireless key in plain text."

    If you haven't configured it yet, how can they get your PSK?

  • Judge Tells FBI It Doesn't Have A 'Two-Minute Rule' That Allows It To Listen In On Personal Phone Calls

    allengarvin ( profile ), 21 May, 2015 @ 10:16am

    Understandable

    It's easy to mix up rules for eating fries dropped on the floor with rules for snooping on people's private communications. Happens nearly daily for me.

  • Yes, Switching To HTTPS Is Important, And No It's Not A Bad Thing

    allengarvin ( profile ), 17 May, 2015 @ 09:28pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Troublesome certificates...

    Yes, abuse of certificate authority is something that's hard to protect against. That's where we rely on the PKI infrastructure to audit CA issuing procedure--it would suck for Verizon if they were caught doing that, and Cybertrust's root CA got revoked. Why would they risk it?

  • Yes, Switching To HTTPS Is Important, And No It's Not A Bad Thing

    allengarvin ( profile ), 17 May, 2015 @ 10:20am

    Re: Running a CA

    "I'd love to see a protocol somewhere between http and https, that negotiates and encrypts traffic, but doesn't rely on a trust framework."

    It's possible to implement TLS without X.509 PKI infrastructure. In fact, there's an RFC out there that has an alternative, RFC 5081, which allows exchange of OpenPGP keys--this has been allowed since the TLS 1.2 standard (2008 or so); actually the RFC implies other types of cert exchange may be used if it's explicitly negotiated, but 5081 is the only one I know of.

    As far as I know, no one has implemented it yet. There seems to be no interest in it.

  • Yes, Switching To HTTPS Is Important, And No It's Not A Bad Thing

    allengarvin ( profile ), 17 May, 2015 @ 09:48am

    Re: Re: Re: Troublesome certificates...

    "Verizon does not need the private key since they can use their own private key to encrypt everything again. The only way that you'll notice this is when you check that public key that you've received. "

    No, part of the SSL verification process on the client side is verifying that the domain you're going to matches the domain in an X.509 certificate (the CN in the Subject portion). Unless Verizon managed to acquire a certificate with www.google.com as the CN, you'll get a cert mismatch error on your browser.

    TLS is well-designed to prevent MITM attacks. Now if the MITM has the private key, that's a different matter. Perfect forward secrecy prevents decrypting after the fact if the session is simply packet-captured. It's not protection against a proxy when the evil party can redirect your traffic through it. And if the cert issuing process is compromised, that's another problem. But people people notice when a CA can't be trusted.

  • Yes, Switching To HTTPS Is Important, And No It's Not A Bad Thing

    allengarvin ( profile ), 15 May, 2015 @ 08:20pm

    There are lots of great arguments but...

    It remains costlier to scale because of the additional computational overheard of TLS. That's still a fact in 2015. It's not necessarily prohibitive, but it has to be taken into account. Load balancers acting as SSL proxies may need additional licensing, or a lot more cpu resources. CDNs charge more for it. And, worse, if you're making that money back in ad revenue, advertising services can pay less when forced to use ssl (or, you might have to skip some sources because they don't serve ssl ads and you don't want one of those "some elements of this page are insecure" messages on your site).

  • IRS Finally Examines Backup Tapes, Recovers 30,000 'Missing' Lois Lerner Emails

    allengarvin ( profile ), 25 Nov, 2014 @ 01:21pm

    Re: What the heck were they thinking?

    It's probably important to note these are "disaster recovery tapes", not email archive tapes. As such, they're probably full disk or LUN image backups, probably taken at regular intervals (month? quarter?). A fragment of data is not particularly useful in a DR situation. So I can easily imagine that recovering email over several years requires examination of a bunch of tapes, especially if there's a regular purge going on, on the servers. DR tapes aren't going to have space-saving measures like incremental diffs or dedupe. You want to dump a full image and bring it up as fast as possible.

    (Also, as for size, I have 9 years of email from a previous job, from 2005 to 2014, exported as PSTs, converted to mbox format and exported to timestamped individual files. The median size is 12k [ls -l | awk '{print $5}' | sort -n | sed -n "$(($(echo * | wc -w)/2))p"], but the average size is a much larger 180k [46k messages totalling 8.1G], and I know I would frequently delete mails with big attachments that I didn't want to save).

  • American Spectator Magazine Deletes All Mentions Of Brett Kimberlin Following Apparent Settlement

    allengarvin ( profile ), 20 Sep, 2014 @ 09:08am

    American Spectator has journalistic integrity?

    The magazine that introduced America to theories that Vince Foster was murdered by Clinton to suppress stories about him ordering state troopers to kidnap women and carry them to his boudoir?

    Ok, they don't seem as crazy as they did 20 years ago, but does anyone pay attention to them?

  • Huffington Post Finally Responds, Stands By Its Completely Bogus, Totally Debunked 'History Of Email' Series

    allengarvin ( profile ), 04 Sep, 2014 @ 09:45am

    You're arguing with the Puffington Host!

    This is only a small step above sending a letter to the Daily Mail saying they got some facts wrong.

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