aerinai’s Techdirt Profile

aerinai

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  • Sep 15th, 2017 @ 9:15am

    well if he can answer 702(b)(4)...

    sounds like Wyden needs to ask an enumerated question like....

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(1) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(2) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(3) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(4) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Might take a while, but hey... if you are going to play the game...

  • Sep 15th, 2017 @ 9:15am

    well if he can answer 702(b)(4)...

    sounds like Wyden needs to ask an enumerated question like....

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(1) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(2) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(3) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Can the government use FISA Act Section 702(b)(4) to collect communications it knows are entirely domestic?

    Might take a while, but hey... if you are going to play the game...

  • Sep 15th, 2017 @ 6:09am

    Re: Usually I agree with your analysis....

    While maybe slightly tone deaf, I'd expect people to take it as light hearted advertisement for the show. Reading between the lines I heard 'we aren't going to send you threatening letters, so please watch it on Netflix'

    This is a much better approach than the 'You wouldn't steal a car... copyright theft is a crime' crap that we were inundated with 5+ years ago.

  • Sep 14th, 2017 @ 11:44am

    Drain the swamp?

    There are just no words to describe how corrupt this is. This is the kind of thing that happens in 3rd world countries ran by dictators.

    You know there is no accountability when not a single person is charged, multiple people are STILL promoted, and dirty money flying everywhere...

    Congress should investigate each and every officer and official that contacted or used Bristol and fire them on the spot for gross negligence.... but instead... expect more promotions and more kickbacks and another Bristol to spring up in a couple months (if there isn't one already out there).

  • Sep 12th, 2017 @ 11:25am

    What is so hard about this...

    I just am appalled at how slapdash these e-voting machines are. You hear about these Still running Windows XP or never having even the most basic of a security audit ran on them...

    It would seem this market would be ripe for someone to disrupt it with the use of a 'modern' OS *gasp*, security audits, and a paper backup that the voter can validate and be kept for a manual audit.

    However... because it is our government we are talking about, these systems aren't chosen on merit, but by who has donated the most money to a congress critter in the area... 'MERICA!

  • Sep 11th, 2017 @ 12:03pm

    Welcome to the future

    Just like everything, this is about trade-offs.

    Microsoft has had the ability to 'sabotage' your computer since XP with software updates. Apple could cut you off from your iCloud backup any time you want. The phone in your pocket relays location-based information to you every second of the day.

    Hardware is becoming software. I think CFAA is broken, not that hardware can be updated OTA. Perfect example is Jeep got hacked a couple years back. Only 'fix' was taking it into a dealership! If something is internet-connected, it should be able to be OTA updated. If that scares you, it should scare you more that anything reaching 'outside' to the internet is way more scary when it cannot be patched.

  • Sep 11th, 2017 @ 10:33am

    So much for 'Community Policing'

    Just like so many things, just because something is legal, doesn't mean you should. This is an optics problem that the UCD Police Department should consider changing if they want to have the goodwill and support of the public.

    I get upset at how these LEO die-hards bemoan the loss of respect that officers are shown. They see every cop as the Sheriff of Mayberry, but for some reason I don't ever recall him pulling a stunt like this...

    Side Note: I have friends that are cops and I respect how difficult their job is. It is asshats cops like this that make their job harder on a daily basis and put them in more danger... Pick your battles UCD... this isn't the cross you want to die on.

  • Sep 11th, 2017 @ 6:45am

    Double Standards

    Isn't it Comcast who makes sure when you are locked into a two-year agreement that you are going to pay a 'termination fee' if you want to cancel service? How is this any different than them signing a contract with the state to run an additional 550 miles of cable?

    Such a 'novel' interpretation that the First Amendment somehow negates contract law...

  • Sep 7th, 2017 @ 8:05am

    Goodbye East Texas Jobs

    So let's assume for a second this is allowed to stand.... All I'm hearing is it is dangerous as a company to have business dealings or employees in East Texas...

    Assume for a moment that you are a tech company that has to litigate this nonsense. Wouldn't it make more sense for me to lay off my East Texas workforce (especially in remote instances like this) to lower my risk? Be cheaper to fly in a sales person every week than 'establish residence'.

    If you live in East Texas, say goodbye good paying jobs, courtesy of your one and only Judge Gilstrap!

  • Sep 6th, 2017 @ 8:43am

    Isn't Streaming the same as Over-the-Air/Cable television?

    So I have a question that I hope someone can answer for me... What copyrights do Over-the-Air television broadcasts need? Going down the list, I'd assume:

    #1 would not apply since it isn't making a copy
    #2 would not apply since it isn't a derivative
    #3 doubtful if you would need that given the transitory nature
    #4 yes because it is giving the public access via the OTA/Cable medium (is that the right interpretation?)
    #5 yes? Seems similar to #4 so having a hard time parsing that one
    #6 yes, obviously.

    So just because this is music and you get to 'pick' what you want, how does that differ from multiple channels?

    I really think people need to realize just because 'it is done on a computer' doesn't mean this stuff is brand new...

  • Sep 6th, 2017 @ 5:27am

    Get ready for password sharing to be a prosecuted under anti-terror legislation

    I'm a developer, and maybe that has jaded my thinking about issues and problems... I would have thought that lawyers would have had the same rationale as me, but I'm starting to think they are the yin to our yang.The more I think about it... developers try to close all loop holes and lawyers try to create as many as possible.

    We try and create a solution that works for the largest amounts of use cases with the smallest amount of effort. In cases like this; where you are looking for a zero-tolerance policy (absolutely no terrorists/anonymous interactions) then you are setting yourself up for complete and utter failure...

    When a workaround is as simple as sharing a password, STEALING a password, or using an open protocol (*gasp!*)... you have failed even the most rudimentary of protections... of course then you have to create an anti-terror law to fix this 'edge case'. etc. etc. etc.

  • Sep 5th, 2017 @ 9:06am

    Severe incompetence

    Just goes to show you don't need to actually be good at your job to keep your job.

  • Aug 31st, 2017 @ 5:32am

    Re: Re: Re: Steam Key Solution

    My suggestion was not a one-size-fits-all, but yet another option for devs to employ on a case-by-case basis. HumbeBundle and other key resellers have a legitimate business and shouldn't be penalized.

    Use cases would include:

    A developer wants to give out 100 free keys to promote their game for whatever reason, a feature to lock that to a specific account would be helpful to stop resellers getting their hands on it.

    A developer wants to hand out a key to specific reviewers. Given there are lots of bloggers and other alternative media sources, it would be nice to know someone who is requesting one can't just sell the key.

    A developer hears a story about a person who can't afford the game and wants to give them a key, but doesn't want them to sell it.

    Those are more of the use cases I'm looking at; giving the developers power to control their generosity without it being used against them; not trying to kill legitimate 3rd parties.

  • Aug 30th, 2017 @ 1:11pm

    Steam Key Solution

    What I don't get is why Steam doesn't do a 'key to id' validation... Key A only unlocks the game for gamertag B. Game cannot be 'gifted' if this key is used. Seems like a simple way to shut down shady sellers and let businesses give them away at their discretion.

    "Need a key? provide me your steam account name and we'll hook you up!"

    Blam... problem solved *mic drop*

  • Aug 21st, 2017 @ 2:30pm

    'Doing it wrong'

    Something else these journalists are leaving out... the option to MONTH BY MONTH decide when to cancel a service... If I want to watch a single show on CBS's streaming service, I can subscribe for ONE MONTH, then cancel it. Wait a year... do it again. Can you do that with cable? Nope... you have a $5 surcharge for changing anything on your account and that pesky 2 year service agreement and don't forget install fees when you want it back...

    You could easily subscribe to 1 streaming service a month and switch which one that is and only pay at most $15.

    Good luck finding a cable provider that will let you do anything like that...

    I feel like this is the same type of journalism like they had when trains were first coming out comparing the speed of a train to that of a horse... "Well the horse is faster in this very short race we set up, so obviously this new fangled train thing will never catch on..."

  • Aug 7th, 2017 @ 1:15pm

    'John' -- Care to Share?

    John,

    Masnick has given his viewpoint on multiple occasions and has used logic, reason, and all here are pretty familiar with his stance.

    Do you care to share what you believe to the be actual rules on the matter of copyright? I see you lashing out at others, but not contributing to the conversation at hand. It seems to me that you believe Slater has a valid copyright; and with this being a law blog and all, do you care to counterpoint with reasoned logic what your interpretation of the law is? Citations help when making a case, so please include any that are applicable.

  • Aug 7th, 2017 @ 9:42am

    Re: Moving On

    What I don't get is he could still capitalize off of it... He can make prints... he can sign it... he can literally do whatever he wants with this picture. Fair Use and Public Domain doesn't mean that what he has created can't be monetized... you just have to make a market for it.

    A great example of this is I could print my favorite XKCD print off the internet and hang it on my wall (which is legal under CC BY-NC 2.5 license), but I'd rather spend $25 to buy it from the guy that created it. It helps him, I get signed art, and everyone leaves happy.

  • Aug 7th, 2017 @ 6:11am

    Comcast Fix is Simple... Slightly Different Verbiage

    While I do have high hopes for this case, it will not stop them from these practices. Their lawyers will just change the agreement to say 'All Taxes and Fees' instead of 'Taxes and Government Related Fees'. Surprised their lawyers missed that one.

  • Jul 28th, 2017 @ 1:58pm

    6 years and still no justice

    I think it is sad that this event occurred over half a decade ago and they are still having to fight this.... glad for the win, it definitely is a slam dunk I would have thought... but any time the boys in blue are involved... let us throw common sense out the window

  • Jul 24th, 2017 @ 8:43am

    Additional Rules at The State Level

    Can't the States pass a new law that buries these guys in paperwork so that trying to skirt the federal process is so cumbersome that no one would want to do it?

    Also, couldn't the States also pass a law that says any federal asset forfeiture split returning to local PDs will instead go into that State's general fund when there was not a conviction?

    Both of those things I would think put the kibosh on an end-run around local control... but again, that is a perfect world. I can imagine the royal bitch fit Police Lobbyists will throw if either of those rules were tried to be put in place.

    Wishful thinking on my behalf I guess....

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