Nokia Exec To Developers: Embrace DRM & Digital Locks Because I Say So

from the very-convincing dept

In recent years, we've seen the entertainment industry suddenly embrace mobile as a platform, incorrectly believing that its more locked-down nature would mean that it wouldn't face the same "threats" (which they should see as opportunities) of file sharing and open networks and services. However, as is always the way, more open systems are catching on and getting more usage, and more closed systems are having trouble getting traction. Rather than embracing that, however, it appears Nokia is pushing to hold back the tide.

Ben S writes in to highlight a rather unconvincing talk given by a Nokia VP trying to explain to open source developers why they need to embrace DRM, intellectual property, digital locks and subsidies in the mobile world. However, his reasoning basically amounts to "because I say so."
"Why do we need closed vehicles? We do. Some of these things harm the industry but they're here [as things stand]."
In other words, there's no actual reason to use these things, other than that Nokia says you must -- even though it knows such things harm the industry. Way to show leadership in the mobile industry. No wonder it seems like most innovation in the mobile space is coming from folks other than Nokia.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    some old gy, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 9:24am

    Nokia needs it

    Artificial restrictions are the foundation of Nokia's business model. Nokia needs it to survive. Well, either that, or they have to change their business model. But as I've repeatedly stated, a company can change everything *except* the foundation of their business model.

    However, the world does not need Nokia to survive. So if the mobile phone business has to kiss Nokia goodbye in order to progress in the direction that its customers demand, then so be it. There is no need to drag Nokia kicking and screaming into the "I'm not going to let you fuck me anymore" future market. We can just instead choose to leave them behind.

     

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  2.  
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    sonofdot, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 9:26am

    Nokia?

    Nokia? What do they make these days, padlocks?

     

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  3.  
    identicon
    Jaqenn, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 9:37am

    There is no need to drag Nokia kicking and screaming into the...future market. We can just instead choose to leave them behind.

    Don't overlook that Nokia bought TrollTech (makers of the QT framework, which powers the Linux KDE desktop environment.) That apparently doesn't keep them from being stupid, but a significant portion of Linux users would be inconvenienced if Nokia dies.

     

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  4.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 9:45am

    I thought Nokia was already dead :)

     

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  5.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 9:49am

    QT

    That's what forks are for.

    And actually, it seems to me that Nokia is asking QT developers to embrace the "dark side".

    I suspect that they will tell Nokia to guess again.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
    icon
    PaulT (profile), Jun 18th, 2008 @ 9:58am

    Good timing

    I was just looking at buying a new phone. Guess it won't be a Nokia then...

     

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  7.  
    identicon
    Jim, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 10:14am

    Re: Good timing

    My thoughts exactly. I have been needing a new phone for about a year now. I haven't pulled the trigger yet because I find the whole market to be infuriating.

    Why do I need to sign a two year agreement to buy a new phone? Why do I have to pay extra to change the ring tone (not that I care about that)? Why must the phone producers be in cohorts with the service providers?

    It is all annoying enough that I have decided to hold off until the OpenMoko comes out (or possibly Android). If locked down hardware/software isn't what you want - refuse to give ANY money to anything but fully open alternatives.

     

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  8.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 10:17am

    Re: Nokia?

    Paperweights.

     

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  9.  
    identicon
    Vicki, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 10:35am

    Re: Re: Good timing

    Yep. I'm waiting to see what goes down after the Android release while my 2 years of indentured servitude with T-Slo (at least they're relatively cheap, bless their hearts) winds down.

     

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  10.  
    icon
    ConceptJunkie (profile), Jun 18th, 2008 @ 10:39am

    Why do we need Nokia?

    We don't.

    Come back when you're ready to play in the Open Source world by _its_ rules.

    HAND.

     

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  11.  
    identicon
    barrenwaste, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 10:45am

    Hey, I needs me some Nokia. Without them my world would be empty and dark. It is the very center of my universe and if I cannot have it I will be forced to suicide....um....what does Nokia do again?

     

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  12.  
    identicon
    Overcast, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 11:03am

    Hmmmmmm, let me see...

    Blackberry... iPhone.

    Who's Nokia again?

     

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  13.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 11:38am

    Re:

    They make the brick.

     

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  14.  
    identicon
    boost, Jun 18th, 2008 @ 11:46am

    Re: Re: Good timing

    Nokia does sell quite a number of attractive models unlocked from a service provider. I've been considering their phones for a while. Though, i think I'll keep the one I have until it dies. I'm really just waiting until my contract is up and I can tell AT&T where to shove 'it' whenever they decide that providing a 'service' isn't really what they're about. Some would argue that has already happened, I suppose.

     

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  15.  
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    Derek Kerton (profile), Jun 18th, 2008 @ 2:34pm

    In Defense Of Nokia

    I don't work for Nokia, nor does my consulting firm have any contract with them.

    I certainly don't agree with the accusation that there is no innovation coming from Nokia. This particular blog post certainly points to a boneheaded move by the Finnish company, but that doesn't represent everything this company does.

    Nokia was a freakin rubber boot company 20 years ago, for crying out loud. No joke. You don't think they had to innovate a little to get from there to where they are today?

    Failed phones such as the N-Gage game platform show a willingness to innovate and try ideas, with an "it's OK to fail" attitude. Phenomenal devices like the N95 push the envelope as to what a mobile device can do. Open platforms like Symbian show a future-looking view. Linux platforms on their tablet devices are VERY open. The mere existence of their tablet devices is innovative. The integration of WiMAX in their N810 is innovative. Their radical (if not good) ComesWithMusic strategy for putting music content on their phones is unprecedented. They have a forward-looking strategy that hardware will be commoditized, so Nokia has adopted a very aggressive push to be a service provider.

    I'm sorry. While this company, like most others, isn't perfect, it IS almost a poster child for what we want to see in the global economy: aggressive, competitive, innovative company that is willing to question the status quo, question itself, re-invent itself, and constantly innovate.

    Yeah, I think the iPhone and Blackberry are awesome, too, but that is irrelevant to the fact that Nokia is a very positive force in the global telecom industry.

    Maybe you all were thinking of the big US handset maker?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  16.  
    identicon
    Nimrod, Jun 19th, 2008 @ 7:22am

    In the mobile world Nokia is the 800 pound gorilla

    Last year alone they sold more than *300 million* phones. Apple expects to sell 8M units in 2008 while Nokia sells this number of phones in a *week*.

    I'm not working for Nokia but you have to admire them and at least listen when they talk.

    The mobile world is very different from the PC world - as Intel has found out in the last 8 years (recently sold its Cellular division to Marvell).

    The closed model and the fact that operator are subsidizing subscribers is what gives you top notch technology and services for relatively very little cost.

    To really understand the numbers you have to remember that just recently Verizon payed almost $10 *billion* for spectrum licenses in the US. Somebody has to pay for this :)

    As for myself - I'm all for Android and open market. But it is way more complicated than you guys think.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  17.  
    identicon
    Nimrod, Jun 19th, 2008 @ 7:22am

    In the mobile world Nokia is the 800 pound gorilla

    Last year alone they sold more than *300 million* phones. Apple expects to sell 8M units in 2008 while Nokia sells this number of phones in a *week*.

    I'm not working for Nokia but you have to admire them and at least listen when they talk.

    The mobile world is very different from the PC world - as Intel has found out in the last 8 years (recently sold its Cellular division to Marvell).

    The closed model and the fact that operator are subsidizing subscribers is what gives you top notch technology and services for relatively very little cost.

    To really understand the numbers you have to remember that just recently Verizon payed almost $10 *billion* for spectrum licenses in the US. Somebody has to pay for this :)

    As for myself - I'm all for Android and open market. But it is way more complicated than you guys think.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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