UN: The Problem With The Internet Today Is It's Just Too Open & Terrorists Might Use It

from the terrorists!-run! dept

Ah, the UN. As highlighted by Declan McCullagh, a new report from the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force, clocking in at an unwieldy 158 pages (pdf) warns that this old internet of ours is just too damn open, and that means terrorists can use it. Thus, it has to stop the openness. The report really is just about that bad: if terrorists might misuse it, it's bad and must be stopped. The costs of locking up all this openness are brushed aside, if they're even considered at all. Among the problems? How about open WiFi?
ISPs may require users to provide identifying information prior to accessing Internet content and services. The collection and preservation of identifying information associated with Internet data, and the disclosure of such information, subject to the appropriate safeguards, could significantly assist investigative and prosecutorial proceedings. In particular, requiring registration for the use of Wi-Fi networks or cybercafes could provide an important data source for criminal investigations. While some countries, such as Egypt, have implemented legislation requiring ISPs to identify users before allowing them Internet access, similar measures may be undertaken by ISPs on a voluntary basis.
It seems like it should be a general rule that, if you're supporting something that includes better surveillance tools by saying, "Hey, Egypt -- the same country that recently had the people rise up to force out a dictator, who tried to shut down the internet -- does it!" perhaps you don't have a very good argument.

The report is basically one big "OMG! But... but... terrorists! Kill it!" It talks about things like "standardizing" data retention rules for ISPs, while we here in the US don't currently have data retention rules -- nor is everyone in agreement that such things are good. Nevermind all that... terrorists!
The development of a universally agreed regulatory framework imposing consistent obligations on all ISPs regarding the type and duration of customer usage data to be retained would be of considerable benefit to law enforcement and intelligence agencies investigating terrorism cases.
Also... all that social media stuff going on out there? Scary, scary stuff because terrorists might use it as well. They might publish propaganda on it, and we can't have that:
The promotion of extremist rhetoric encouraging violent acts is also a common trend across the growing range of Internet-based platforms that host user-generated content. Content that might formerly have been distributed to a relatively limited audience, in person or via physical media such as compact discs (CDs) and digital video discs (DVDs), has increasingly migrated to the Internet. Such content may be distributed using a broad range of tools, such as dedicated websites, targeted virtual chat rooms and forums, online magazines, social networking platforms such as Twitter and Facebook, and popular video and file-sharing websites, such as YouTube and Rapidshare, respectively. The use of indexing services such as Internet search engines also makes it easier to identify and retrieve terrorism-related content.
You hear that? All those internet companies, enabling terrorists. Oh, and they're not just handy for terrorists to promote their propaganda... but to sneak up on the dumb users who reveal important info for terrorists as well:
Particularly in the age of popular social networking media, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and blogging platforms, individuals also publish, voluntarily or inadvertently, an unprecedented amount of sensitive information on the Internet. While the intent of those distributing the information may be to provide news or other updates to their audience for informational or social purposes, some of this information may be misappropriated and used for the benefit of criminal activity.
Loose fingers on Twitter sink ships, as the saying goes.

Now, of course, some of this is just describing what's going on out there for those who haven't realized that any communications technology can be used by both people with good intentions and bad intentions (and no intentions at all). And we shouldn't freak out about that kind of thing. But, the report does also make some "legislative and policy recommendations," where it gets worrisome:
In order to provide effective criminal justice responses to threats presented by terrorists using the Internet, States require clear national policies and legislative frameworks. Broadly speaking, such policies and laws will focus on:
(a) Criminalization of unlawful acts carried out by terrorists over the Internet or related services;
(b) Provision of investigative powers for law enforcement agencies engaged in terrorism-related investigations;
(c) Regulation of Internet-related services (e.g. ISPs) and content control;
(d) Facilitation of international cooperation;
(e) Development of specialized judicial or evidential procedures;
(f) Maintenance of international human rights standards.
Nice of them to throw in that last one about human rights... because all of those other ones are really about ways to chip away (often with a pretty big digital bulldozer) at human rights and civil liberties. In providing examples of countries that have put in place good anti-cyber-terrorism laws... they list a who's who of countries with dubious human rights records, including Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and the United Arab Emirates. Oh, and China:
In the terrorism context, in China there are provisions criminalizing different forms of terrorist activities, including article 120 of the Criminal Law, which criminalizes activities related to organizing, leading and participating in terrorist organizations. This broad criminalization provision covers a wide range of terrorism-related activities, including those carried out over the Internet.
Of course, if you also get to define what counts as "terrorism," I imagine such laws can be quite handy in making opposition parties and activists disappear (or at least get them to shut up).

There's a lot more in the report like that. While the report pays lip service to "human rights" throughout, it really seems to focus on a whole bunch of ways to chip away at those human rights all because terrorists might be out there, using your internets.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    Lord Binky, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:30am

    I read terrorists use food too. I'd start by controlling food so that a terrorist never uses it, then we don't have to worry about terrorists.

     

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  2.  
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    Anonymoose Custard (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:32am

    But, I thought...

    Isn't the Counter-Terrorism Task Force supposed to protect us from fear-mongering, and not behave like terrorists themselves?

     

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  3.  
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    Robert (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:43am

    Re: But, I thought...

    This is the UN we're talking about!

    What's funny is the UN writes nasty letters about rights abuses or countries preventing weapons inspections. That's it. Just a letter. Nothing gets accomplished.

    Remember the letter from the UN regarding Israel's reaction to the flotillas? Yeah, neither does anyone else.

    But this cyberterrorism buzz-word, fearmongering crapolla they call a "report" will actually do something. It will be used by the US to push more ACTA/SOPA/PIPA/ScrewLotsUnderThisSection legislation. Yet nothing will come of the rights abuses or war crimes or anything else that the UN does that comes without teeth.

     

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  4.  
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    John Fenderson (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:45am

    Re: But, I thought...

    You've misunderstood the purpose of "counter-terrorism" rhetoric. It's not to protect us from fear-mongering, it's to perpetuate the fear-mongering for the benefit of the Powers That Be.

     

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  5.  
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    Jon Renaut (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:48am

    Buy the UN a dictionary

    I think someone on this task force needs to look up the definition of "criminalize" and "unlawful".

     

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  6.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:53am

    Lets see how does any sensible terrorist or master criminal communicate with their cronies, by phone, no it can be monitored, by internet, same thing applies, by trusted courier carrying some form of flash memory, yes that will do.

     

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  7.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:55am

    I know that i use the roads, but don't the terrorists also use the roads? is there a way to prevent the terrorists from using the roads? Maybe we should just close some of the roads, you know, the ones terrorists use the most? Like the freeways. I bet the terrorists use them all the time. I sure would feel safer if we closed the freeways.

     

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  8.  
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    BreadGod (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:57am

    I know the UN will label me a terrorist for saying this, but I'll say it anyway: he who sacrifices liberty for security deserves neither.

     

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  9.  
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    Russ (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:58am

    Freedom fighters

    one persons terrorist is anothers freedom fighter.

    Where does Hamas fall according to the UN?

     

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  10.  
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    Christopher Best (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:04am

    Maybe People Will Start to Realize

    How bad the U.N. really is... Or at least the General Assembly.

    Sure, it's a good idea in principle: A forum for all the world's nations to get together and talk things out. Heck, that's a great idea!

    The problem is when people want to give such a body any sort of power, or allow it any sort of regulatory control--primarily because it's got representatives from every nation!

    Hey, guess what! Most nations in the world are despotic cesspits which are diametrically opposed to the concepts of freedom and liberty for their subjects! And yes, I use the word subject, as opposed to citizen, because that's how they view people within their borders.

    Think about it this way: we know how bad the U.S. is lately in the realm of protecting their citizens' rights. Now consider the fact that the U.S. is probably still one of the best nations in the world in that respect, especially in regards to protecting freedom of speech. Scared yet?

    The majority of UN member states are either:
    1) dictatorships
    2) ruled by religious fundamentalism
    or
    3) both of the above

    As such, ANY policy put forward by the General Assembly is going to reflect their priorities: Control of individuals and protection of their power.

     

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  11.  
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    Joe Publius (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:05am

    So many tools available to the bad guys

    I see what you did there:

    The problem with bicycles today is that anyone can learn to use them, and Bad Guys* might use them!

    The problem with underwear today is that anyone can wear them, and Bad Guys might use them!

    *Don't want to say the "T" word. I heard if you say three times you'll be teleported to Gitmo.

     

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  12.  
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    Yogi, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:09am

    UN Speak

    How can anyone take the UN seriously?

    The UN Human Rights Comission is manned by human rights' luminaries such as Sudan, Syria, and Libya. I think the UN understands human rights in a completely different way than most of the readers on TechDirt.

    Similarly, since most of the countries making up the UN are dictatorships of one sort or another, "terrorists" in their context probably means "citizens" in the regular world.

    Citizens are surely a threat to any regime, and since the internet can be used to promote both human rights and civil participation, than internet=terrorism and must be controlled.

     

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    Zakida Paul (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:11am

    Re:

    They also use cars and houses too. Must destroy them all.

     

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  14.  
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    Michael, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:12am

    Re: Maybe People Will Start to Realize

    I disagree on a couple of points:

    1) "Most nations in the world are despotic cesspits which are diametrically opposed to the concepts of freedom and liberty for their subjects"

    Most?

    2) "we know how bad the U.S. is lately in the realm of protecting their citizens' rights. Now consider the fact that the U.S. is probably still one of the best nations in the world in that respect"

    lately?

     

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  15.  
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    Michael, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:14am

    Re: UN Speak

    One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.

    Heck - that's what they called a bunch of guys that dumped tea in Boston Harbor some time ago.

     

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    Christopher Best (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:20am

    Re: Re: Maybe People Will Start to Realize

    Most?


    I'm allowing for the chance that there are some nations out there that I am unaware of that don't fit that bill. I'm pretty optimistic about Iceland, for instance.

    lately?


    When did I say they were better in the past? It doesn't matter, anyway. The only relevant data is their current behavior.

     

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    Nimas, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:24am

    Re: So many tools available to the bad guys

    I hear terrorists can use carrier pigeons, before their extremist rhetoric encouraging violence could only have been distributed to a relatively limited audience.

    And *gasp* we have to laws for retaining information on carrier pigeons! The horror!

    *******************************************************

    As an aside, they really use "relatively limited"? Dear god, EVERYTHING is relatively limited, and *every* *single* *advance* in communication has effectively increased audience in what could be described as some, "a relatively large increase".

     

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  18.  
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    Trish, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:24am

    Gutenberg?

    Better shut down that printing press, Gutenberg, terrorists might use it.

     

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  19.  
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    Shmerl, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:25am

    Re:

    Don't forget. Terrorists breathe too. Aren't they worried about the availability of air?

     

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  20.  
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    Yogi, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:27am

    Re: Re: UN Speak

    Oppressing people is not equivalent to not oppressing them.
    Raping black animist because they are not Muslim, is not the same as letting them live their lives and not raping them.
    Enslaving Asian workers, not paying them for years and then killing them when they try to run away is not the same as paying your workers a salary and so on.

    You can argue that every society has the right to live within its own values, but I cannot see how all values are morally equivalent.

     

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  21.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:29am

    Re: Re:

    Yeah seriously it sounds pretty dumb.

     

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  22.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:32am

    any truth in the rumour that terrorists breath? i heard it somewhere

    are the idiots in the UN really voted into positions and paid out of public funds? any of them actually got the interests of the public in mind or are they just another bunch that are bought and paid for by the entertainment industries? do they need sacking and quickly, or what?

     

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  23.  
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    CaitlinP (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:38am

    Oh No!

    This is reminiscent of Freedom of Speech. God forbid we limit that in any way shape or form when it comes to doing it in person in the name of religion. "We can't do much about hate speech when they're yelling it out on the streets." is what I hear in response to stuff like the Westboro Church or other entities.
    Yet when it's out on the Internet it's, "Terrorism!" somehow. Like saying something in text as compared to out loud is somehow inherently different in meaning.
    It's interesting to see how people automatically shut down and act defensively in silly ways as soon as they hear any word associated with fear. Maybe we should stop calling it Terrorism and start calling it what it is. Sad.

    The Internet is simply another avenue of human expression. It should not be limited because to limit it would be akin to limiting ourselves. Limiting access to the Internet simply because Terrorists use it is like saying we should discontinue Welfare or Medicaid because there are lazy people who abuse those services as well.

    Oh wait...

     

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  24.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:39am

    Re:

    Voted in by by who? When did you have an election for UN representatives??

     

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  25.  
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    Russ (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:45am

    Re: Gutenberg?

    I think the Pope had that idea when luther was loose with all those dangerous notions.

     

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  26.  
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    Gregg, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:50am

    I'm not sure what a Terrorist is anymore. Are protesters terrorists? are revolutionaries terrorists? are all Muslims terrorists? Are anti-Americans Terrorists? are Civil Rights activists Terrorists? Is Greenpeace a Terrorist organization? are all Palestinians Terrorists? Are Israelis's Terror's? Are bloggers terrorists? .....And now Scientists Terrorists or just criminals????

     

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  27.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:55am

    Re:

    No need to close them.

    Just have every driver show ID when entering and exiting the roads and retain that information along with the entry/exit times and locations, number of stops, average speed, etc... for a minimum of 5 years just in case it could help law inforcement catch bad guys.

     

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  28.  
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    Michael, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:58am

    Re: Re: Re: UN Speak

    I agree, but it is rarely as simple as "oppressors" vs. "non-oppressors".

    There are horrible people that do horrible things, but you have to be very careful that dealing with them does not have a profound effect on people that simply disagree. When does a "freedom fighter" become a "terrorist"? When they hold a protest in the street? What if their protest causes a fatal car accident? How about burning a flag? Burning an empty building? Shooting back at an oppressive military?


    "I cannot see how all values are morally equivalent"

    I would argue that morality itself is relative. Some people believe it is immoral to kill and eat animals. I can see how their argument makes sense, but I still like bacon. You may view something as extreme and someone else may view it as normal. I would never agree with some of the crazy violent things that have happened in our history (and are still happening), but I do recognize that my view of right and wrong may differ drastically from someone else's.

     

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  29.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:03am

    Re:

    Western governments are trying to terrorize their citizens into giving up their rights. Does this make them terrorists?

     

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  30.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:09am

    is there any country, any government, any official organization that doesn't want to take complete control of the internet or doesn't object profusely at the ordinary people using it? is it just the facts that the various bodies above are not getting the amount of tax from it or simply that they dont like the way people can talk to each other thousands of miles apart, inform each other of the shit that is going on in the other persons country or that they can organize themselves into a formidable opposition to propositions that have not been agreed by the public?

     

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    Mark Harrill (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:11am

    Regulate the TV News

    From the report:

    The promotion of extremist rhetoric encouraging violent acts is also a common trend across the growing range of Internet-based platforms that host user-generated content. Content that might formerly have been distributed to a relatively limited audience, in person or via physical media such as compact discs (CDs) and digital video discs (DVDs), has increasingly migrated to the Internet.


    They left out the part where the news media also distributed the extremist rhetoric (think all of Bin Laden's video/audio). We need to regulate the TV news and lock it down so it only tells us what those in power want to say. That shouldn't be a problem at all should it?

     

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  32.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:20am

    The first stage of the Holocaust was identification.

     

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  33.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:27am

    Oh NO!

    But how would the UN know who the terrorists are?

    unless.....


    THEY ARE THE TERRORISTS!!!!!


    RUN EVERYONE RUN!

     

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  34.  
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    TasMot (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:28am

    We need to pass laws to make unlawful activities illegal


    In order to provide effective criminal justice responses to threats presented by terrorists using the Internet, States require clear national policies and legislative frameworks. Broadly speaking, such policies and laws will focus on:
    (a) Criminalization of unlawful acts carried out by terrorists over the Internet or related services;


    Can anyone (without having a laughing fit) please explain why we need new laws to make illegal activities illegal?

    Seriously, I want an answer because I don't understand. Please help.

     

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  35.  
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    Michael, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:35am

    Re: We need to pass laws to make unlawful activities illegal

    Great question.

    It would also be great to get an explanation of why we should only criminalize unlawful acts when they are carried out on the internet - because I think in-person unlawful acts should also be illegal.

     

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  36.  
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    Bengie, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:41am

    Re: Re:

    I'll start burning tires right now! I'm a true patriot.

    Hopefully by the time I'm done, all the terrorists will have died from me poisoning the atmosphere.

    I'm doing it For The Children(tm)

     

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  37.  
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    Bengie, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:43am

    Re: We need to pass laws to make unlawful activities illegal

    Haven't you been to a patent office lately? "On the Internet" makes things new and different.

    Illegal activities "on the internet" are not illegal.

    /headexplodes

     

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  38.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:44am

    No comments yet on one important line

    This one:
    (c) Regulation of Internet-related services (e.g. ISPs) and content control;

    Notice the provision for content control? Sounds like our old Hollywood-based buddies have their filthy lobbying tentacles in the UN these days as well.

     

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  39.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:45am

    Re: Regulate the TV News

    And he cleverly used them to distribute by using courier and mail to get it to them. Note the TV stations and news organizations are where it got onto the net! Better get them check with the authorities before they broadcast or publish anything.

     

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  40.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:47am

    I like how:

    "f)Maintenance of international human rights standards."

    is the last point on their list. Just goes to show how much they care about it, and how they didn't just throw it in there at the end to not freak out human activists.

    Seriously, what is it with Governments lately trying to gain full control of the Internet and wanting to know everything everyone says online? Are they really that scared of their own population?

    And do they actually think the terrorist threats will scare us? They are so transparent when using this excuse. It's so obvious they are using it to gain power.

     

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  41.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:50am

    The word terrorist I think, no one knows the definition of it. Ugh. Anyone could be a terrorist. Lets all just live in a bubble together to get away from the terrorists.

     

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  42.  
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    Gregg, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 12:03pm

    Re:

    Exactly! then one by one groups were identified, targeted, scapegoated and sent off to their death.

     

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  43.  
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    Gregg, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 12:05pm

    What about the Telephone?

    Could Terrorists by chance use a Telephone, Fax machine, Telegram, Postal Service, Video Camera, two cans and a string??? How about Telepathy???

     

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  44.  
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    Hans B PUFAL (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 12:07pm

    Re:

    Not to mention air and water.

     

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  45.  
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    Christopher Best (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 12:07pm

    Re: We need to pass laws to make unlawful activities illegal

    Can anyone (without having a laughing fit) please explain why we need new laws to make illegal activities illegal?


    I'll take a shot at it: If you're a citizen of country A, and you break the laws of my country (B) on the Internet, currently I can't have you arrested. (Unless country B in this case is the USA, but for the sake of argument let's forget about that for this moment.)

    So maybe they want to fix that little "loophole" in the law.

    That way, all those criminals won't get away with insulting the President/Monarch/Prophet or whatever other crazy laws these dictators like to impose on their subjects.

     

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  46.  
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    Igor, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 12:40pm

    disband the UN

    This report is just another sign that the US has outlived its usefulness and has to be disbanded

     

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  47.  
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    Aaron, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:06pm

    Response to: Lord Binky on Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:30am

    While I read this article I thought up several "then outlaw ___ because terrorists might use it" statements. From realistic to absurd. However none of them were able to so succinctly show he rediculousness of the statement as your was. +1 internets for you and -1000 reality points for the UN people involved.

     

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  48.  
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    Lord Binky, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:08pm

    Re: Re: So many tools available to the bad guys

    Stupidity is relatively limited to the earth as far as I have seen so far.

     

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  49.  
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    Lord Binky, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:15pm

    Re: Re:

    Even if it doesn't help with terrorists, at least I'd know who ran over the squirrel and didn't clean it up.

     

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  50.  
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    Arthur (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:36pm

    Re: Danger! Danger!

    I hear terrorists use politicians to further their activities! Let's get rid of all politicians!

    Wait, that actually works!

     

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  51.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:37pm

    And video games too?

    Might have seen this one yesterday on Kotaku, and wasn't there at least one part of the report that attacked video games?

     

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  52.  
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    thetech, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:41pm

    Re:

    It would be nice if you gave credit to the person who originally said the quote you are using.(B.F. if you do not remember)

    Thanks,
    Reddit member

     

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  53.  
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    Arthur (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:42pm

    Think of the children of terrorists!!

    It used to be, when you wanted to slip some dodgy bit of legislation through, you'd always say "It's for the children!".

    Now it's "Terrorists!"

    Same ol' dodgy legislation, new the-sky-is-falling excuse.

    Let's give them the ultimate excuse to ram through bad legislation, "It's for the children of terrorists!!"

    Arty

     

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  54.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:42pm

    Re: Re:

    The sad thing is the police in the UK already monitor where you go in your car and take pictures of you all around the M25, reading, and Surrey.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  55.  
    identicon
    ldne, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:50pm

    Re: Oh No!

    Comparison fail.

    The internet is supported by the fees paid to the ISP's for access, paid to the companies for purchases and the advertisers who pay to place ads on the sites. It's voluntary, if you do not wish to use it you simply don't pay for the services. If someone chooses to offer an open connection to people, such as at a coffee shop or restaurant, they pay for it and it's up to them to voluntarily provide the access. Medicaid and Welfare are not financially supported by the people who use it, or by volunteers, it is supported by forced taxation.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  56.  
    icon
    BreadGod (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 1:59pm

    Re: Re:

    Then again, it's been said so many times it's pretty much embedded itself into the culture.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  57.  
    identicon
    k, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 2:17pm

    The needs...

    The needs of the many out weight the stupidity of the few.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  58.  
    identicon
    Law Abiding Citizen, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 2:42pm

    I laughed.

    Lets be honest. We have more chance of a piano falling on my head at your front door than to be attacked by a so called terrorist.

    Its clear to everyone that the people behind the terror are the ones with all the money. Arabs aren't the problem, Jews aren't the problem. Zionism is the problem my friends.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  59.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 2:44pm

    Re: Re:

    Clearly, we need to detonate enough nuclear bombs to burn away the atmosphere. This will not only prevent terrorists from stealing our air, it will also finally win the war on terror. (Unless silicon-based lifeforms evolve or something.)

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  60.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 2:57pm

    Re: Re:

    this system shouldn't be intrusive and not difficult to use. The name should signify its ease of use...i think EZPass is an appropriate name.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  61.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 3:42pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    With this EZPass, we could link the vehicle to the owner with their complete address and maybe even their bank account. Genius!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  62.  
    icon
    Anonymoose Custard (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:29pm

    Re: Re: But, I thought...

    .... Which is terrorism.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  63.  
    icon
    Anonymoose Custard (profile), Oct 24th, 2012 @ 9:36pm

    Re:

    Any person who would spread fear - terror - is engaging in terrorism.

    People who detonate explosives in public places to destroy and cause death and chaos do it not to kill people, but to instill fear. Terror.

    People who tell us who we should fear, instill fear in those who listen to them. Terror.

    Terrorism is fear-mongering, whatever its form.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  64.  
    identicon
    Riddla26, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 10:51pm

    While this situation is pretty ridiculous, let me just inject some sanity into the argument before the kneejerk reactions becoming even more ridiculous.

    The excerpts in this article are pretty well sensationalized. You print a sentence and then tell what that sentence implies, vis a vis Egypt, when in actuality the portion that was printed in the article [emphasis mine] reads:

    While some countries, such as Egypt, have implemented legislation requiring ISPs to identify users before allowing them Internet access, similar measures may be undertaken by ISPs on a VOLUNTARY basis.

    Is the quote from the document. To which Techdirt tacks on as some sort of implied imaginary justification the UN is using - which just isn't the case - is:

    "Hey, Egypt -- the same country that recently had the people rise up to force out a dictator, who tried to shut down the internet -- does it!"

    If you actually read and understand what Techdirt is implying, it becomes much more ridiculous. The article you link to about internet access being shut off is from January 2011. Not only is this MONTHS after the uprising began, but President Mubarak did not even stand down until February. So yeah, the old dictatorship tried to shut down the internet, while the new government requires some information on you be verified before they provide your service to prevent fraud and, yes, terrorism. Much like many ISPs already require from you. Your entire "omg dictators in Egypt shut down the internet lets not be like them" angle is not only fraudulent but inaccurate to boot and frankly insulting to the freedoms of the Egyptian people that Techdirt insinuates they had an uprising because someone turned off their Facebook access.

    Given all the stuff like SOPA, ACTA, LALA and PO recently I have few doubts that there won't be a massive public outcry about this, but this article is just sensationalised bullshit trying to stir people up before the actual issues with the proposal have been isolated, it's insulting.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  65.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Oct 24th, 2012 @ 11:49pm

    Shaq is more qualified at giving advice on how to make the perfect free throw every time than the UN is qualified at giving guidelines on human rights.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  66.  
    identicon
    Julian, Oct 25th, 2012 @ 5:00am

    Re: Re:

    You know that might actually be a good idea, let the people choose who they want to represent them in the UN.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  67.  
    identicon
    SlickR, Oct 25th, 2012 @ 6:38am

    Re:

    Haha, great post. I'd just like to add that all the scary terrorist that everyone needs to piss their pant at the very mention are run by NATO and the USA.

    I mean we've even had Dennis Kucinich write in huffpost hey we are running and arming Al-Qaeda is Syria, Ron Paul has said so in congress, other decent human beings, as well as all the media. The Guardian reported, NYT, Washingtonpost, etc... that yeah NATO and the USA are allies with Al-Qaeda and are arming them in Syria who cares, you still need to give up all your rights because of Al-Qaeda.

    Its just a one big giant joke.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  68.  
    identicon
    Jerian, Oct 25th, 2012 @ 6:55am

    Terrorists can use cell phones? Ban all cell phones!
    Terrorists can hijack airplanes? Ban all airplanes!
    Terrorists can sail speed boats? Ban all speedboats!
    Terrorists can use the internet? Ban the internet!

    UN, do you see how ridiculous your claims look now?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  69.  
    icon
    Jim Hill (profile), Oct 25th, 2012 @ 9:42am

    Common cause

    This is exactly the kind of thing that gets the fundamentalist nationalists nearly insane with fear and anger. On this one just about everyone in the U.S. can make common cause.

    riddla26 apologizing for it above with "voluntary" http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20121022/17162220792/un-problem-with-internet-today-is-its-just-too -open-terrorists-might-use-it.shtml#c875 is blinkered: the victims are not "voluntarily" being stripped of their rights.

    The crimes invasiveness fosters are far worse than the crimes it's supposed to help prevent. Rooting out terrorist cells is a legitimate interest. This is burning down the house to roast the pig.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  70.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Oct 25th, 2012 @ 10:05am

    Re: But, I thought...

    Son, we don't like your kind. We're gonna send your fingerprints to Washington

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  71.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Oct 25th, 2012 @ 11:44pm

    Internet Freedom is almost dead.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  72.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Oct 26th, 2012 @ 8:02am

    The problem is that other communication mediums are not open enough. The government has wrongfully handed over the exclusive use of broadcasting and cableco communication channels to corporate interests and the govt. industrial complex doesn't like people having an efficient communication medium to criticize them through. They've gotten so spoiled and used to being able to get away with brainwashing, lying to, and omitting information from the public and bombarding us with pro-corporate, anti-consumer (ie: pro-IP) propaganda while censoring any criticism and getting away with it that when something comes along that can expose our government industrial complex for their lies and for the criminals they are they all go nuts.

    The solution is to abolish govt. established broadcasting and cableco monopolies. No one has a right to have govt established exclusive privileges over both content and communication medium so that they can exploit those privileges against my, and the public's, interests.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  73.  
    identicon
    Penis, Oct 26th, 2012 @ 2:16pm

    THEIR ASSES ARE TOO OPEN

    maybe the terrorist want to penetrate them...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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