EU Proposal Would Outright Ban BitTorrent Sites, Make ISPs Copyright Cops & Use 3 Strikes

from the just-what-the-industry-ordered dept

You have to give the entertainment industry lobbyists credit for one thing: they never give up. When one of their proposals gets slapped down they always have many other efforts underway to give a similar proposal life somewhere else. So what if the EU Parliament said that using a three strikes policy went against basic civil rights? Just get another person to come up with a proposal that's even more strict. That seems to be what's happening as the EU Parliament may consider a proposal by Manuel Medina Ortega, which TorrentFreak notes basically is a perfect wishlist of the Big Copyright players. You've got your three strikes policies, your demands that ISPs "take responsibility" and (best of all) the declaration that all BitTorrent and file sharing services are 100% illegal -- no questions asked. Hmm. Apparently someone forgot to inform all the creative folks who are happily using such systems to distribute their works... I don't know enough about European politics to know if this is likely to go anywhere, but given earlier EU Parliament rulings, I'm hopeful that this is quickly tossed aside as being completely out of touch with reality.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 7:41pm

    WOW

    Blizzard warning

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
    identicon
    eleete, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 7:46pm

    Re: WOW

    Global Warming Climate Crisis. must do something NOW !!!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 7:57pm

    Record and movie industry:

    9,999,999,999,999 strikes and counting: DIE ALREADY!

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    identicon
    elduderino, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 7:58pm

    holy crap

    blizzard uses a bittorrent style to distribute its patches and stuff

     

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  5.  
    identicon
    peniis, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 8:27pm

    hmmm

    ok ban file sharing services, but you can't ban people from having an FTP server and some friends... you can't force people to buy your crap if they don't want to when anyone can make a copy of something in a digital age. there will ALWAYS be a way. this just parallels 'uncrackable' hardware, where sadly, the public is already 10 steps ahead of you.

     

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  6.  
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    Dr.A, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 8:47pm

    maybe this can explain it

    If you succeed in cutting off the torrents, many of the "global" artists will be much less popular, leaving the space for local artist to get noticed by the public. "American" / "English" culture will become much less influential in most of these countries.

    Free pirated american media acts in a way like the free food we send to Africa, preventing any chance of a real agriculture developing there.
    For tangible goods you have a dumping price policy but it is difficult to apply that to the unlimited free goods.

     

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  7.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 8:50pm

    Manuel Medina Ortega

    this guy g it all wrong:

    instead of adding all those rules/laws.

    he just has to lobby for more expensive slower internet access.

    if every1 has to pay 200USD for a 256down 64up connection all his problems would be solved

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 9:07pm

    Re: Manuel Medina Ortega

    yes, good idea, make a byte more expensive than a gallon of water

     

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  9.  
    identicon
    mike allen, Feb 2nd, 2009 @ 11:16pm

    answear

    go to library borrow CDs go home rip or copy CDs go to library return CDs borrow CDs rip copy CDs and on it goes takes longer but still viable.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  10.  
    identicon
    Daniel Lucraft, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 12:12am

    Think there's been a mistake

    If you check the actual text of the report, it seems to recognize the controversial nature of P2P sites, and specifically leaves them out of the 'illegal' part:

    "One very sensitive area is that of ‘peer-to-peer’, i.e. the phenomenon of websites and software
    whereby internet users share, either directly or via a shared site, files containing reproductions
    of protected works or services without the consent of the rightholders (Napster (centralised),
    Kazaa (decentralised)).

    The activities of websites that are NOT part of the peer-to-peer phenomenon and which allow
    downloading of protected works or services without the necessary authorisation are illegal,
    and no exception can be applied to them."

    So I think there's been a mistake somewhere with this article.

     

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  11.  
    identicon
    Alex, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 1:48am

    It's an opinion only...

    It's not legally binding. Also it's by a parliamentary committee that usually bows to rights-holders' interests. There's hope --- Amendment 138 (banning 3-strikes) wasn't in the original Telecoms package as voted on by the same committee, it had to be added in the plenary vote.

     

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  12.  
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    Claes, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 2:05am

    Here in Sweden the attempt to get this passed has been seen by some as a way to politically influence the outcome of the trial against Pirate Bay which will be held in just two weeks. The Pirate Bay is explicitly mentioned in the Medina proposal as an example of a site that illegaly spreads copyrighted works on the internet (even though it's of course only a torrent search page and a bittorrent tracker).

    Now there are of course different jurisdictions within the EU and activity of The Pirate Bay may be legal in some countries and illegal in others (just like providing a YouTube-service probably wouldn't be possible under Swedish law), but still it almost seems to be bordering on slander to call the site illegal when its legal status is still unclear in most european countries and there hasn't been any conviction.

     

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  13.  
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    Ben Lebedinets, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 4:03am

    hmmmmmm....

    just like eq2 or diablo 2, put very strict cd keys on albums, even if you have an ipod, you need to have entered the cd key atleast once to be able to play it, the album has to be a single file, software maybe.

    .....but people can and always will be able to record sound....hmmm...

     

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  14.  
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    Ben Lebedinets, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 4:05am

    hmmmmmm....

    hmmmmm...

     

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  15.  
    identicon
    claire rand, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 4:36am

    private servers

    next step will be a proposal to ban "unlicensed" servers. it won;t work either

     

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  16.  
    identicon
    Kiddy Saver, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 6:56am

    Thank God...

    Thank god they are doing this... I'm sure it helps to protect the children...

     

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  17.  
    identicon
    Xiera, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 7:08am

    Re: maybe this can explain it

    Really? I'm an American and most of the music I listen to is from Europe...

     

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  18.  
    identicon
    Xiera, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 7:13am

    Re: hmmmmmm....

    CD keys that were commonly cracked and led to legit users being unable to play because someone else found their key.

    And even then who's stopping people from sharing the CD key with the song?

    A bad idea for all parties.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  19.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 7:54am

    The report exhibits a sensitivity to the points raised from both sides of the aisle. To vilify it and the author is quite unfair and does lead me to wonder if it has truly been read for content, or if this is simply another pavlovian response to anything having to do with the continuation of copyright law in general.

     

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  20.  
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    Anon, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 7:58am

    Re: Think there's been a mistake

    A mistake? A mistake like how you place a "s" where a "z" should be three times with three different words? :)

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  21.  
    identicon
    nasch, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 8:33am

    Re: hmmm

    I'm not sure either of those things are true. In theory at least, it would be possible for a government to ban FTP servers. I mean if they could consider banning one protocol, they could ban some other one. I'm not saying it's going to happen, but it's not impossible. And they can certainly force people to buy their crap, via a mandatory music fee/tax. Technically that only forces people to pay for their crap, not actually obtain it, but that's splitting hairs.

     

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  22.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 8:54am

    Re: Re: Think there's been a mistake

    I think UK English uses "s" instead of American English which uses "z".

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  23.  
    identicon
    The Authority, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 11:02am

    Mistake.

    The only mistake is visiting this site. You are all animals and you belong in a soo.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  24.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 11:04am

    Rediculous

    If the industry was subject to its own rules, it would have been banned from the net a long time ago.

    Maybe babies can be "chipped" at birth, and music will only play on devices that detect their chip.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  25.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Feb 3rd, 2009 @ 12:10pm

    Re: hmmm

    > ok ban file sharing services, but you can't ban people from having an FTP server and some friends...
    Really? Did you notice that most ISPs already ban ALL SERVICES on their customers' computers, not just FTP? If not, perhaps you should read the terms of your contract. And maybe you also noticed that most ISPs already block all traffic from third parties to their customers, thus making it impossible for granny to offer her pictures on the web from her own computer. That is why people have to rely on commercial (ad supported) third party sites.
    The reason why ISPs already obey all orders from the entertainment industry is simple: they are part of the MAFIAA. We have the same situation in the EU and US. And I think there is only one solution to sponsor the Internet as a network: break up the industry, separate the ISPs from the entertainment industry. Then we will have a fair market. Perhaps we could also eliminate the middleman by opening up wifi access points and using cable connections as backbone. The truth is that the backbones are already heavily subsidised, very much like public roads.

     

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  26.  
    identicon
    Good tidings, Feb 20th, 2009 @ 9:42am

    the medina ortega report is dead...

    No, seriously. Maybe it's because the elections are on the horizon. Maybe because the text would fail if it was presented by a first-year law student. Anyway, it's dead... Strange how the report being on the table got loads of press coverage, but its failure is getting none.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  27.  
    identicon
    Jane, Dec 6th, 2010 @ 11:58am

    Re: answear

    mike allen, try to look here: http://nanotorrents.com

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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