RIAA Can't Explain Why Copyright Damages Should Be Higher

from the um...-just-'cause? dept

Back in December, many people were surprised that Congress had put forth the PRO IP bill that would increase the fines that could be assessed to people found violating copyrights -- especially coming so soon after the outrage over the huge amount allowed under existing law. As Congress is trying to figure this issue out, the US Copyright Office held a roundtable discussion to examine the issue, where it asked the RIAA to explain why larger fines would be a good thing, and even the RIAA couldn't come up with a decent answer. Specifically, RIAA supporters were asked to name a single case where the damages were seen as too low under existing laws, and there was little response. While there was some discussion of cases where the RIAA didn't like the outcome, that wasn't because the fines were limited to too low a number based on the law.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 3:44pm

    They need the high fines to pay for friendly Representatives and Senators. The US has the best government money can buy.

     

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  2.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 3:51pm

    Re:

    agreed

     

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  3.  
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    ZeTron, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 4:13pm

    The following website has potential

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
    identicon
    ZeTron, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 4:13pm

    The following website has potential

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  5.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 4:17pm

    All about the Money

    I really really wish sometimes that members of Congress could have no business dealings once they are sworn into office. If you are a CEO of a company and decide to run for Senate, fine by me. Just realize you are making an important commitment and you should be choosing between your own personal good, and the good of the nation.

    The amount of money a year these people make is more than adequate. Hell, the President makes twice as much at 400,000 dollars a year. I'd be happy with 40,000 a year. Shit, I'm happy with the 24,000 a year I already make.

    Its long past time that a separation of Commerce and State should be enacted. Congress is supposed to be upholding the defense and representation of the People, not some corporations many of whom aren't even U.S. based.

    Regulate business practices, fine. They do the same for religion technically. I don't see anyone being allowed to conduct human sacrifices (or even animal sacrifices in some states) because it is a part of their religion. Why are these people allowing some rather stupid shit to go on just because it makes a business more money?

    Only plausible answer: Some members of Congress are getting a cut.

    For people shouldering what should be a big responsibility, they are behaving selfishly. Rather than respecting their responsibility they are abusing it to further their own needs. A word for it comes to my mind: Treason.

    What else could you call an abuse of government capabilities of such a high level? Or even if no one in Congress is on the payroll of a corporation, what about their negligence in protecting the American People? No matter how you look at this, it is a betrayal of the trust and ideals of America.

    No fucking wonder the rest of the world gets pissy about America. Too many of our leaders are hypocrites.

     

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  6.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 4:33pm

    Re: All about the Money

    Can you prove that congressmen are getting brided by those special interest group such as the RIAA.

    It is one thing to dupe a congressman, but it is quite another to be corrupted and paid.

    I want proof to back up your assertions before we spread such serious accusation.

     

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  7.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 4:47pm

    All About the Money

    I agree it is a serious accusation, but I do believe more and more big business are buying politicians for they're own interests or at least they try to. It seems to be the way things are going to benefit the rich and not the whole of the people.

     

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  8.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 4:54pm

    do not underestimate the power of greed.

     

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  9.  
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    R. H., Jan 30th, 2008 @ 5:31pm

    Re: Re: All about the Money

    The problem here is that the members of Congress are expected to vote on things that they oftentimes don't understand. This is where the lobbyists come in. The technical job of a lobbyist is to 1) inform the Representative or Senator that they are courting about the issue at hand and 2) tell them why it would be so wonderful for the country if they voted in a certain way. I'd like to see the corrupt lobbyists that tey to manipulate our Congress-people go away but, I don't expect anyone to inherently know everything there is to know about every issue that effects this country without some kind of help.

     

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  10.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 30th, 2008 @ 5:38pm

    >>Can you prove that congressmen are getting brided by those special interest group such as the RIAA.

    The difference between a bribe and a compaign contribution has become vanishingly small. Large campaign contributions are almost always accompanied by negotiation and barter about votes and policy stands. Big donors expect free access to legislators and their staffs. Money buys influence. It's often wrong even though it is legal.

    The main difference is that campaign contributions go into paying for reelection where bribes go in the pocket. The effects on ownership of government is indistinguishable.

     

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  11.  
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    mike allen, Jan 31st, 2008 @ 2:01am

    no government

    No government would bring in such silly and stupid laws and high fines except under threat of war (record companies havenot the weapons.) or bribary i suspect that is the same in US and UK. Companies have a nack of forcing things people dont want whether that is a Supermarket on someones doorstep or a law. it happens too often to be anything other than a backhander.

     

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  12.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 31st, 2008 @ 7:35am

    Obviously the lower fines did not stop the problem. Speeding on the highway draws one fine, speeding in a work zone or a school zone draws a higher fine.

    Assault draws on sentance, hate crime assault draws a stiffer fine.

    Kind of easy, isn't it?

    You bitch about DRM and everything, but in fact if people didn't do it in the first place, DRM wouldn't exist. I remember when software games came out, software didn't have DRM, it was nice, things were easy. Why do you think they changed?

    Now lets hear its because they wanted people to have to buy multiple copies. Now lets hear how prices were too high. Lets hear some more excuses.

    Fact is, if people didn't break the law there would be no problem.

     

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  13.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Jan 31st, 2008 @ 4:08pm

    Re: Re: All about the Money

    #6: Two words: Dan Rostenkowski. Dirtiest damn senator we've had, and there's been some prize ones.

    #12: If the prices weren't so high, people wouldn't feel the need to do it. Smoke that one, hypocrite.

     

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  14.  
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    mark, Feb 1st, 2008 @ 11:41am

    Some senators have been caught taking bribs and have been sentenced. That corucption in goverment happens doesnt supprise me.

    however you have to have proof before you can accuse them.
    that is they way our system is set up.

    there have been games out there that are resonably priced and people still copie.
    copy protection and drm happend in part because there are many people that will copie programs without paying for them if they can. It also happens because some people will assume that you will copie it if you can.

    but what drm and copy realy do is just annoy those of us who do legaly buy the music or movies and then want to put it on a mps player or on our computer.

    personly I make copies of mine put my originals away and then use my copies in my jeep. when they get scratched I make new copies and destroy the scratched set. I can leave this set in my jeep and if some one steals them I can replace them from my originals. DRM or copy protection makes this hard to do.

    so I dont like drm or copy protection but I understand where the music, software of movie industry is coming from.

     

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  15.  
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    UK IP, Feb 6th, 2008 @ 3:40am

    Radiohead - more pirated their album, rather than

    Just to wade into the argument here.

    When Radiohead released their album recently for whatever you wanted to pay, the average payment was just over £3, although you could buy it for just 1p. However more people pirated the album on places like Pirate Bay because, and this is the really important bit, it was easier.

    The reasons piracy started was to get over the high costs of media. But now it's become second nature and until companies can offer their products and services in a way that has more value and ease than pirating of a site, you'll always have piracy.

    And being from the UK, the suggestion that senators or ministers can guide their country for their own financial gain is blatant treason. Which incidentally can still carry the death penalty in the UK, by hanging.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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