The New Bankers Of Internet Porn

from the such-a-stigma dept

It's not entirely clear why legal porn gets such a stigma. Yahoo was forced to stop selling porn DVDs years ago because one reporter noticed that they had this option in their stores -- even though everything there was completely legal. Now, a lawsuit over a bank ditching iBill, one of the more popular payment services for porn has people looking at the new bank that handles the merchant accounts for iBill and, apparently, for competitor ccBill. The article also notes that iBill's deal to be acquired was canceled last week, over concerns that the acquiring company would be delisted for handling the credit cards on porn sites. While I really couldn't care any less about what happens with porn sites, I'm wondering why there's so much attention being placed on companies associated with the industry. If they're not breaking any laws, then what's the problem? If they are breaking laws, then someone should accuse them of actually breaking laws.


Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    NotActive Jeff, Sep 27th, 2004 @ 3:43pm

    Legal does not equal moral

    Just because an activity is legal, does not make it moral. It was legal for Bayer to conduct experiments on Jews during WWII, because legally in Germany they were no longer considered human. Does that mean it is OK to do business with Bayer? Some people will not do business with them even after all these years.

    I resigned from a job because the struggling company I worked for decided that hooking up with an online port distributer would quickly solve their cash problems. Sorry, but I just dont want that on my resume thank you very much.

    The industry may be "legal" in this part of the world, but in others it is not legal. It is a moral issue. Enough people (me included) feel that the porn industry is immoral and objectionable in every way. It victimizes women and children, and destroys true intimicy between married men and women.

    Like it or not, enough people share my view as to not want to do business with those that support porn.

    Just thought you would like an explanation.

     

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  2.  
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    Joe Schmoe, Sep 27th, 2004 @ 3:53pm

    Chargebacks

    Not a morality issue so much as a financial one.

    It's been said that porn related purchases result in a larger percentage of chargebacks and contested payments (be it with dissatisfaction or the anecdotal spousal factor - "Honey, I didn't do that. Must be a mistake - I'll call the card company and get it reversed.")

     

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  3.  
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    Fazookus, Sep 27th, 2004 @ 7:29pm

    The New Bankers Of Internet Porn


    The big deal is because sex is Evil! Ashcroft spent $8,000 to cover up a stone (or was that aluminum?) boob!
    We are a stupid people, we Americans.
    Faz

     

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  4.  
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    Loraan, Sep 27th, 2004 @ 8:09pm

    Re: Legal does not equal moral

    If we assume that pornography victimizes those who participate in its creation, then wouldn't porn victimize women, children, AND men? Or are men somehow immune from being victimized because of their penis?

    I believe that this omission demonstrates a cultural bias against males and towards females as victims. Neither characterization is fair or accurate.

     

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  5.  
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    Monty, Sep 28th, 2004 @ 5:11am

    moral vs legal.

    To be upfront, I'm a catholic who does not watch porn nor will I allow such a thing in my home. Seen enough when younger to understand how much of a "fantasy" world they create.
    NotActive Jeff said
    "It was legal for Bayer to conduct experiments on Jews during WWII"
    Bad example since the experiments were done against the wishes of the Jews. No one in porn is forced to make it, watch it or pay for it.
    And if morality was so tied to doing the "right" thing, then why are the largest users of porn located in the bible belt? Don't believe me, go check the numbers. Before the internet, "adult" entertainment was limited to large cities and in certain areas. NY, Boston, LA were the hot spots. When internet porn became available the demographics changed practically over night.
    The adult business is a multi-billion dollar industry yet everyone is against it. The truth is the majority of people want access to it, but without anyone knowing.
    Can you say hypocrits?

     

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  6.  
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    bob, Sep 28th, 2004 @ 5:14am

    Legal vs. social sanction

    I can't tell if your objection is to (1) customers that decline to deal with a bank that provides services to porn vendors (I wouldn't think you are suggesting that they be compelled to bank at a particular place), (2) banks that decline to do business with porn vendors, possibly because they wish to target customers in category 1, or (3) reporters/publications who write/publish stories about banks declining to serve porn vendors, presumably because they believe they'll sell?

    The fact that a particular form of commerce is legal (that is to say, not illegal) does not make it compulsory. Deciding to target certain classes of customers is a business decision. So long as there is no violation of law (e.g., by discrimination against a protected class), one step in that targeting might be to decline to serve other potential customers. Management makes such decisions - the shareholders have the right to agree or disagree. Customers, of course, vote with their money, as always.

    It seems likely that there is a place for social sanctions that are beyond those encoded in law. Etiquette, for example, is a semi-codified version of social sanctions. Does everyone agree with every social sanction? Of course not - but then not everyone agrees with every law.

     

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  7.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Sep 28th, 2004 @ 7:50am

    No Subject Given

    Sorry, this just seems plain stupid. Trying to base you business decision on morals only works for the individual, not for a business.

     

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  8.  
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    Lewis, Sep 28th, 2004 @ 8:56am

    Re: moral vs legal.

    "No one in porn is forced to make it"
    The most famous counterexample is Linda Lovelace, the star of "Deep Throat," who claims that her husband forced her to act in porn. Details in her autobiographies.

     

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  9.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Sep 28th, 2004 @ 8:25pm

    Re: Legal does not equal moral

    Disliking porn does not make it immoral. If I didn't like red sneakers, I don't have a moral issue, just a prejudice.

    Prehaps you have heard, but maybe not. A study in Australia has found that porn is not harmful, and my infact be health.

     

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  10.  
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    Monty, Sep 29th, 2004 @ 10:55am

    Re: moral vs legal.

    I'm glad you brought that up because it proves that the industry has nothing to do with it. I'm guessing that if she wasn't married to him she wouldn't have listened. I haven't read the book so that's just my $0.02.

    thanks for the info.

     

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  11.  
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    Katherine, Nov 16th, 2005 @ 12:42pm

    Re: Legal does not equal moral

    I just had to reply to your statement when you said. Disliking porn does not make it immoral.
    By making that statement goes to show that you SIR don't know your own ass from porm, porm has broken up so many families I guess if you were to be a fly on someone wall that's dealing with those issues right now and if you were to listen to a child's cry because one of his parents has broken the marriage rules and has crushed the family, then you might know how to put the meaning moral and what's immoral in perspective.

     

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  12.  
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    Anonymous, Nov 2nd, 2008 @ 12:05pm

    Re: Re: Legal does not equal moral

    I agree the way the person in your story used porn is immoral. Does not mean porn itself is immoral. If we do away with pornography where does it end? Are alcoholic beverages immoral? Power tools? Guns? Pain meds? Even religion has caused problems. The list of things which can be used in an immoral or irresponsible manner goes on and on. Should we get rid of all it simply because a few bad apples have no self control? Temptation is everywhere. There is a fly on every wall. We cannot escape. Before you go opening those flood gates put emotions aside and think.

     

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  13.  
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    miki, Jun 2nd, 2009 @ 7:16am

    response

    You Americans are so backward and stupid that the whole world is afraid you'll destroy us all.

    But what can you expect out of rejects who built the country on the genocide (wiping out the whole indigenous culture all together which was in general on the higher level of tolerance and alignment with natural laws that the kind of 'purist' understanding of Christianity these rejects brought with them).

    Sex is not evil, sex is beautiful, and if someone wishes to be watched for money or not no harm will come out of it, but all those opposing that are (in general) against gun control, against Muslims, against blacks, Germans, Slavs, Chinese and against everything different, and they'll all stuck up not knowing that this kind of attitude lead their wives/husbands to addiction to hard ass pounding with their neighbors husband/wife, hiding vibrators and other sex-toys, dreaming about big MILFs or big cocks etc, etc.

    Living so uptight and in such a hypocrisies has its own price, and you'll all pay for it.

    But unfortunately the rest of us may also pay for it, because of the built-up of unburned adrenaline and testosterone in your bodies.

     

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