RJ’s Techdirt Profile

reggie

About RJ




RJ’s Comments comment rss

  • Dec 16th, 2014 @ 11:21pm

    Oh boy! Polling!

    So as is well known and proven, how you phrase a poll question has a huge impact on how the people responding choose to answer.

    I wonder if the results would have been the same, if these had been the questions...

    (1) Revised question: 'A Pew poll shows Americans say, by a two-to-one margin (56-28), say the CIA's interrogation methods after 9/11 (primarily actions explicitly identified in the Geneva Conventions -- which the United States is bound by after near unanimous passage by both houses of Congress, and legislation which Ronald Reagan gladly and enthusiastically signed) such as simulated drowning and other abusive conditions:

    Answer in WP's article: '"provided intelligence that helped prevent terrorist attacks.'

    (2) Revised question: A CBS News poll said that 57 percent of Americans think the that torture techniques such as waterboarding and other interrogation techniques -- which the existing anecdotal evidence suggests result in false information due to the torturee's instinctual reaction to save his life by saying whatever the torturer seems to want -- practiced by the CIA:

    '"provided reliable information that helped prevent terrorist attacks" either "often" or "sometimes." Just 8 percent say it "never" provides quality information, while 24 percent say it "rarely" does.'

    (3) A Washington Post-ABC News poll released Tuesday morning shows people say 53-31 that the CIA's program did:

    'On the asssumption that torture provides reliable information -- which anecdotal evidence strongly suggests is not the case, produce important information that could not have been obtained any other way.'


    I find it... less than convincing that the "average American" has either the familiarity with the small amount of information about the efficacy of torture methods, or the inclination to devote much in the way of thought on the mater.

    So -- hooray polls! Hope WP at least sold some ads or something...

  • Dec 16th, 2014 @ 11:21pm

    Oh boy! Polling!

    So as is well known and proven, how you phrase a poll question has a huge impact on how the people responding choose to answer.

    I wonder if the results would have been the same, if these had been the questions...

    (1) Revised question: 'A Pew poll shows Americans say, by a two-to-one margin (56-28), say the CIA's interrogation methods after 9/11 (primarily actions explicitly identified in the Geneva Conventions -- which the United States is bound by after near unanimous passage by both houses of Congress, and legislation which Ronald Reagan gladly and enthusiastically signed) such as simulated drowning and other abusive conditions:

    Answer in WP's article: '"provided intelligence that helped prevent terrorist attacks.'

    (2) Revised question: A CBS News poll said that 57 percent of Americans think the that torture techniques such as waterboarding and other interrogation techniques -- which the existing anecdotal evidence suggests result in false information due to the torturee's instinctual reaction to save his life by saying whatever the torturer seems to want -- practiced by the CIA:

    '"provided reliable information that helped prevent terrorist attacks" either "often" or "sometimes." Just 8 percent say it "never" provides quality information, while 24 percent say it "rarely" does.'

    (3) A Washington Post-ABC News poll released Tuesday morning shows people say 53-31 that the CIA's program did:

    'On the asssumption that torture provides reliable information -- which anecdotal evidence strongly suggests is not the case, produce important information that could not have been obtained any other way.'


    I find it... less than convincing that the "average American" has either the familiarity with the small amount of information about the efficacy of torture methods, or the inclination to devote much in the way of thought on the mater.

    So -- hooray polls! Hope WP at least sold some ads or something...

  • Dec 5th, 2014 @ 7:21pm

    Minor quibble w/trade flows analysis

    Whether or not car imports/exports make up half of the projected total trade increase doesn't really matter. When domestic car production increases to serve exports this provides income to workers, who then purchase cars, some of which will come from the EU. Unless the increased import volume results in significant displacement of US auto production jobs, on net it seems that this could have meaningful positive effects, at least for the auto sector.

  • May 6th, 2014 @ 11:28am

    (untitled comment)

    This law makes me feel uncomfortable and threatened. Unless we want to countenance the complete breakdown of civil society and render the law impotent, the mayor must be found guilty!

  • Mar 26th, 2014 @ 10:20pm

    Brilliant

    Can I just point out that WTC may in fact have as a condition of sale, that the album (or parts of it) must be made available to the public at a price of >= $0 w/in some time frame? The excerpt quoted in this post only states that "the iconic hip-hop collective will make and sell just one copy of the album"

    I guess what I'm saying is that a future public leak may in fact be an intentional feature & not just left up to the buyer's whim...

  • Nov 26th, 2013 @ 12:41am

    Predictable

    We shouldn't be surprised -- didn't Congress pass a law that specifically exempted telcos from any prior illegal cooperation, while at or near the same time the intelligence agencies were given the ability to compel future telco cooperation under seal? If I were the head of a major telco and believed that my job was to maximize return to shareholders, why wouldn't I cooperate? Where is the downside?

    I think it's a craven and -- in the best sense of the word -- unpatriotic position, but unfortunately the reality "on the ground" doesn't surprise me in the least.