Uriel-238’s Techdirt Profile

uriel-238

About Uriel-238




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  • Aug 31st, 2015 @ 1:37pm

    Just checking.

    So we're getting to the point where trolling is pretty much the norm for IP.

    It's time to abolish IP. We really, really can't do worse.

  • Aug 31st, 2015 @ 1:34pm

    And THIS is why p2p provides the best end-user experience

    Even if it means sifting through degrees of quality (from in-theater recordings to blu-rips) to resolution to compression methods, with torrents you're plagued with an overwhelming abundance of choices.

    In the meantime, the MPAA is trying to block anyone from offering a legitimate means to see Hollywood content except through their exorbitant, ad-ridden, high-suspicion processing machine, which only goes to highlight their attitude of artistic-media-as-manufactured-product.

    No wonder they can't compete with peer-to-peer, and no wonder all sorts of indie material is utilizing peer-to-peer as a distro model.

  • Aug 31st, 2015 @ 1:01pm

    A complex problem with multiple symptoms...

    You know, you may be onto something there.

    I suspect that our gun violence and our prison population are related to a problem of rising discontent.

    Taxation without representation. Redcoats arbitrarily arresting people and then lying in court to convict them.

    Just thinking about it makes me want to shoot a man.

  • Aug 31st, 2015 @ 11:54am

    I thought this was a normal thing for art

    Plenty of art is based on photos or on prior art.

    Why would it be inappropriate for Milou to base a work off a photograph, even a copyrighted one? It's a sufficiently derivative work, yes?

  • Aug 31st, 2015 @ 11:51am

    Worse then Göring

    As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Röhm approaches 1

    As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Göring approaches 1

    WWII historians have dissected at length what probably would have happened if Hitler were either assassinated or diverted from politics. The momentum of history would have kept things moving forward like an overloaded freight train.

    The line up of the Nationalsozialismus administration might have been different. It would be a stretch to suggest the Nuremberg laws would be repealed before the Endlösung was implemented. Maybe a more conservative plan for German expansionism might have been drawn up.

    And we'd be iconizing whichever leader as the ultimate evil to whom we compare our rivals when we're distraut. Hopefully he'd still have a silly moustache that we could mock.

  • Aug 31st, 2015 @ 11:11am

    Re: Re: Re: Gun Love Is Boiling The Frog

    580,000 Americans die of cancer, let's fix that.

    Huge [research] money already going into that so it's already covered as far as humanly possible.

    Bullshit. The US medical system is broken so that all services and products in the US cost orders of magnitude more than they do anywhere else, and yet we have far from the best medicine in the world. We aren't interesting in curing cancer or heart failure or stroke, rather big pharma is interested in helping rich people live longer.

    They'd gladly let the rest of us shlubs drop dead.

  • Aug 31st, 2015 @ 11:02am

    The Boiling Frog metaphor

    The issue to which the metaphor applies is that we do not respond to tyranny and injustice until the effect is personal, e.g. someone we know is personally affected. Most of the US doesn't care about (say) police escalation and the murder of Michael Brown and won't until one of their own is brutalized by the police with no means for redress.

    This is exactly the sort of thing that gets us where we are when it comes to the mass surveillance program or the extrajudicial detainment and interrogation program, both of which continue to go on despite how uncomfortable it makes us, because not enough of us have been visibly tortured or tossed into jail for petty crimes discovered through surveillance.

    Interestingly, rampage killings are visible, much like terrorism and they incline us to want to do something about them. Interestingly, depending on how you define a rampage shooting, we have about the same number of them as we have extrajudicial police killings. There may even be some crossover.

    Regardless, the public is slow to respond and protect human rights, but not because it's akin to a frog getting slow-cooked and acclimating. More that we like to think of ourselves as special and removed from the victims and assure ourselves that it can't happen to me, often based on race or location or circumstances.

    So yeah, when they come for us, no-one will complain because they can't empathize with us.

  • Aug 30th, 2015 @ 8:52pm

    Narrowing the correlations

    Maybe. Do these other countries have low rates of homicide, suicide and accidental hazards as well?

    Not just ones with guns, but, like, all around.

  • Aug 30th, 2015 @ 8:14pm

    Re: Gun Love Is Boiling The Frog

    It's been bothering me all week because the frog anecdote's been used all week.

    It's simply not true.

    Firstly, a frog is disinclined to stay in a pot of water at any temperature. Secondly, in those experiments in which they lidded the pot, the frog would get more and more agitated as the water warmed up.

    When it comes to guns, the problem is that human beings really like to scapegoat. Rather than considering that a complex problem often has complex causes, we are desperate for a simple cause that we can surgically remove with a simple solution.

    We've pushed the issue with video games, violent movies, books (which continue to be challenged to this day), role playing games, rock and roll music and even bicycles.

    So I submit that anyone who blames a shooting on the legality of guns has no more veracity than those who blamed shootings on video games. Or teen deviance on secret messages in Stairway to Heaven. Yes, that really happened.

    We have a long, long history of moral panics by which to induce that people can't tell what's dangerous, and the right to bear arms, even before we argue its intent in the US Constitution, is simply a part of liberty. It's the same basis that we get to use power tools, toss ourselves out of airplanes for recreation and camp in the Sierra Nevadas during winter, even those these all come with known hazards.

  • Aug 30th, 2015 @ 11:45am

    If you want to own your culture, you lock it up.

    If you want to make culture, you let it be shared liberally. Let the fans make fanworks and have fan parties.

    It helps keep them fans and makes fandom infectious.

  • Aug 29th, 2015 @ 7:09pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    They'll care when Microsoft decides to bust them for minor sharing activity. Or kill switch their system because some MS tech got suspicious.

    Microsoft is made up of a lot of people, some of whom have a tendency to get stupid and abuse their monitoring position.

    Kinda like Google and the NSA. In Google it seem fairly rare (or they cover it up really well). In the NSA it's prevalent but not considered abuse from within for (say) a tech to stalk his exes and collect private cheesecake photos.

  • Aug 29th, 2015 @ 12:46pm

    Don't get it.

    I've yet to find the allure of Chipotle, though to be fair, San Francisco is a city of great taquerías.

    After the Scarecrow campaign, I looked up how much of Chipotle food was really from organic and free-range sources and found that there were an awful lot of exceptions where they couldn't find an organic or free-range provider. It seemed Chipotle wasn't trying as hard as the Scarecrow campaign implied.

    The couple of times I've eaten there, the food was bland but palatable. It was also expensive for a buritto in San Francisco (which are, in turn, more expensive than burittos in Oakland).

    So.... meh.

  • Aug 28th, 2015 @ 1:36pm

    Someone took advantage of a notion once, therefore the notion is wrong!

    Yeah who gives a crap of the health and welfare of that bottommost rung of working stiffs, the bar waitress? the next thing you know, they're going to expect us to care about gas-station attendants.

    Cooks don't have to wear hazmat suits because OSHA requires the installation of a fairly high-powered active ventilation system, and this is for smoke that doesn't (typically) contain tar or nicotine.

    Smoking in bars in California is legally banned, but it's a ban not well enforced and many bars are full of cigarette smoke. And they dont have a kitchen-standard ventilation system. Neither, for that matter, do family rooms where parents smoke and don't quit for the sake of their kids, either because they don't care or are just plain that addicted. But fuck 'em, they're someone else's larvae.

    Never mind that the smog from Los Angeles has been regarded as a health threat, also without the tar or nicotine, at a lesser density than is found in bars, homes and motor vehicles. But we can ignore that data given it might tap into our already meager profits.

    Fuck the commons if we can profit by wrecking it for everyone else!

  • Aug 27th, 2015 @ 5:19pm

    "The innocent until proven guilty has no truck in a tyranny"

    Isn't that what makes it tyranny?

    At least it's what makes it authoritarian when one class of people can act on another class with impunity.

  • Aug 27th, 2015 @ 5:11pm

    The spirit of Godwin's law

    Sometimes crossing the Godwin threshold (making a comparison to Nazi policy or behavior) is Justified.

    This isn't the first time that someone on Techdirt has been haunted by the terrible realization that it can happen here.

  • Aug 27th, 2015 @ 4:36pm

    Bad news for this moose.

    My gaming rig is all sorts of AMD.

    Using Win7 for now with no intent to upgrade, though I fear for Microsoft surreptitiously installing spyware akin to the Win10 monitoring agents.

    I may just make my future systems linux and leave this one Win7 as long as possible.

  • Aug 27th, 2015 @ 4:25pm

    Re: Persons in support of ISIS or ISIL...

    Glenn I meant to bold your name, not italicize it. It's just a convention to indicate a proper handle, not a comment on it.

  • Aug 27th, 2015 @ 4:23pm

    Persons in support of ISIS or ISIL...

    ...or any terrorist front are often people who don't know where else to turn, or don't have a choice.

    Now emotionally, Glenn, I'm right there with you. After the assassination of Dr. George Tiller, I was hot to decide that every single pro-life family was made up of crazies as bad as Roeder, who'd gun a man down in a church. I would have been glad to see them all burn.

    But realistically, I know different, and I know that's not fair. Even that creepazoid who was running Operation: Rescue, who was ready to go out with his buddies for hot wings and beer on the afternoon of the murder.

    So no. We (by which I mean the US and its rag-tag team of willing coalitionists) have to resolve to be better than that, and demonstrate our civility is genuine. This would mean striving to extend to ISIS / ISIL reasonable war provisions and rights that would be due any people (maybe as demonstration that we are, in fact, civilized). Historically, by treating our enemy better than they do, we would be able to sway the people away from affiliation with terror groups and towards NATO relief organizations.

    If we're not going to do this, we need to come to terms with the truth (according to our behavior so far) that we don't give a fuck about any of those shitskins on the ground, and we don't care that this makes us as bad as ISIL or the taliban or the Huns or the Nazis for that matter.

    And at that point we can do fire strikes on the towns and seed bioagents all over the theater and wipe out the entire population... unless we're wanting to round up the children and sell them into sex and labor slavery. (Probably at ~$8K per virgin female child).

    Right now the US pretends we have the moral high ground and then shits everywhere. We should either abide by morality, or get rid of the pretense and get busy.

  • Aug 27th, 2015 @ 4:00pm

    Not so sci-fi?

    Maybe read more William Gibson or anything in the cyberpunk genre.

    Computer hackers explore / rob big corporations, get distracted by big terrible secrets. Meanwhile the corporation has traced the hacker to his location and gets his house SWATted.

    Sometimes the hacker escapes, sometimes he doesn't.

    The rest of the story is how the secret gets leaked and to where. Less relevant, usually, is what the secret is.

  • Aug 27th, 2015 @ 3:55pm

    Juxtaposition of who a person is vs. what he does.

    I'm pretty sure a felon who is engaging in more benign activities is just a person with the same rights as anyone else.

    It is the the activity that makes someone a militant. Take the gun out of the revolutionary and let him raise a farm and a family, and he's a farmer and family man.

    If you want to be fair and just and ethical, you don't blow people up for fear of what they might do.

    As for our victims of missile strikes, sure we at home aren't told who they are. The US calls them all militants. When I heard the statistic, civilians were specified.

    I do know this: US officials lie a lot and they have now a long running history of lying to cover their own asses (contrast: the asses of their workforce or of the US in the eyes of the international community). So I've learned to be not just skeptical, but cynical when an official statement is made about anything.

    That said, I have good cause to presume casualties are civilians and innocent until proven otherwise. As a child I was raised under the notion that this is a wise and good presumption to make regarding anyone. At least anyone whose affiliation is unknown.

    When we pick up the bodies, do they have ISIL membership cards? Or do we presume any Muslim or Arab or brown-skinned person in the area is an ISIL affiliate?

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