Gaming Like It's 1923: The Entries Are In

from the game-jam dept

At the beginning of the year, we launched our public domain game jam, Gaming Like It's 1923, with a one-month time limit — and now the entries are in! We figured we'd get a dozen entries, maybe two, but we're with a bunch of last minute entries slipping in under the deadline, we're thrilled to say we've got 35 games based on works that entered the public domain this year.

We've begun the judging process, with our huge panel of great judges. They need a little time with the games, but until we announce the winners in you can try out all the entries for yourself. There's a mix of card games, narrative roleplaying games, browser-based video games and all sorts of creative takes on classic (and not so classic) works. We haven't finished exploring all the entries ourselves yet, and we hope you enjoy discovering them with us!

Stay tuned for an announcement of the winners later this month. We're awarding prizes in six categories:

  • Best Analog Games
  • Best Digital Game
  • Best adaptation of a 1923 work
  • Best remixing of multiple sources
  • Best “Deep Cut” (use of a work not listed on any of the round up articles)
  • Best Visuals

A huge thanks to everyone who entered, and to all the folks helping us out as judges. Given the positive response to this game jam, and the fact that the public domain is set to continue growing (finally), we're definitely going to consider running another one in the future.

Filed Under: copyright, game jam, games, public domain


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  1. icon
    Mike Masnick (profile), 3 Feb 2019 @ 11:58pm

    Re: I'll try not to sneer, but fact is, only one seems to be fre

    First one, the epic in Yiddish: "God Of Vengeance" worked once enabled javascript (I don't care about the spying because all that is cleared out with TOR browser), but next two went to page asking TWO bucks, and didn't go on after clicking the alleged free option.

    Not sure what you're doing wrong, but they are all available for free. But... even that's not exactly the point. If people do want to charge for remixing the public domain, that's perfectly allowed as well.

    But why does it not surprise me that you mock the creativity of others, while we're celebrating it?


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