Broad Alliance Calls For Australian Government To Listen To Experts' Warnings About Flaws In New Compelled Access Legislation

from the nah,-we're-ramming-it-through-anyway dept

The battle against encryption is being waged around the world by numerous governments, no matter how often experts explain, often quite slowly, that it's a really bad idea. As Techdirt reported back in August, Australia is mounting its own attack against privacy and security in the form of a compelled access law. The pushback there has just taken an interesting turn with the formation of a Alliance for a Safe and Secure Internet:

The Alliance is campaigning for the Government to slow down, stop ignoring the concerns of technology experts, and listen to its citizens when they raise legitimate concerns. For a piece of legislation that could have such far ranging impacts, a proper and transparent dialogue is needed, and care taken to ensure it does not have the unintended consequence of making all Australians less safe.

The Alliance for a Safe and Secure Internet represents an unusually wide range of interests. It includes Amnesty International and the well-known local group Digital Rights Watch, the Communications Alliance, the main industry body for Australian telecoms, and DIGI, which counts Facebook, Google, Twitter and Yahoo among its members. One disturbing development since we last wrote about the proposed law is the following:

The draft Bill was made public in mid-August and, following a three week consultation process, a large number of submissions from concerned citizens and organisation were received by the Department of Home Affairs. Only a week after the consultation closed the Bill was rushed into Parliament with only very minor amendments, meaning that almost all the expert recommendations for changes to the Bill were ignored by Government.

The Bill has now been referred to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS), where again processes have been truncated, setting the stage for it to be passed into law within months.

That's a clear indication that the Australian government intends to ram this law through the legislative process as quickly as possible, and that it has little intention of taking any notice of what the experts say on the matter -- yet again.

Follow me @glynmoody on Twitter or identi.ca, and +glynmoody on Google+

Filed Under: australia, backdoors, compelled access, encryption, security


Reader Comments

Subscribe: RSS

View by: Time | Thread


  1. identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 11 Oct 2018 @ 3:47pm

    Re: The Scary Part Is...

    The worst part is it would signal the death kneel of the Tech Sector because NO ONE will be able to trust anything.

    More like it would kill the internet as a business platform.

    Not being able to confirm with any remote level of certainty who your talking to or what they have said is a deal breaker for any business. Even black markets need reliable transactions. Which is what this kind of law makes impossible.

    I'd imagine that these governments will try to "fix" their mistake with another pen-stroke of the "no hacking" variety, but no criminal is going to pay them any mind when given such a huge goldmine to plunder. The gold will be mined until the businesses are forced to close up their online shops. At which point what will be left is probably 4chan and other such community run sites.

    The good news for those of us who remember the internet before Web 2.0 is a return to the old guard. The bad news is the rank and file peasants will no longer have their circuses to keep them entertained, and that will not end well for anyone.


Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here



Subscribe to the Techdirt Daily newsletter




Comment Options:

  • Use markdown. Use plain text.
  • Remember name/email/url (set a cookie)

Follow Techdirt
Techdirt Gear
Shop Now: Techdirt Logo Gear
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Essential Reading
Techdirt Deals
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Techdirt Insider Chat
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Recent Stories
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads

Close

Email This

This feature is only available to registered users. Register or sign in to use it.