China Actively Collecting Zero-Days For Use By Its Intelligence Agencies -- Just Like The West

from the no-moral-high-ground-there,-then dept

It all seems so far away now, but in 2013, during the early days of the Snowden revelations, a story about the NSA's activities emerged that apparently came from a different source. Bloomberg reported (behind a paywall, summarized by Ars Technica) that Microsoft was providing the NSA with information about newly-discovered bugs in the company's software before it patched them. It gave the NSA a window of opportunity during which it could take advantage of those flaws in order to gain access to computer systems of interest. Later that year, the Washington Post reported that the NSA was spending millions of dollars per year to acquire other zero-days from malware vendors.

A stockpile of vulnerabilities and hacking tools is great -- until they leak out, which is precisely what seems to have happened several times with the NSA's collection. The harm that lapse can cause was vividly demonstrated by the WannaCry ransomware. It was built on a Microsoft zero-day that was part of the NSA's toolkit, and caused very serious problems to companies -- and hospitals -- around the world.

The other big problem with the NSA -- or the UK's GCHQ, or Germany's BND -- taking advantage of zero-days in this way is that it makes it inevitable that other actors will do the same. An article on the Access Now site confirms that China is indeed seeking out software flaws that it can use for attacking other systems:

In November 2017, Recorded Future published research on the publication speed for China's National Vulnerability Database (with the memorable acronym CNNVD). When they initially conducted this research, they concluded that China actually evaluates and reports vulnerabilities faster than the U.S. However, when they revisited their findings at a later date, they discovered that a majority of the figures had been altered to hide a much longer processing period during which the Chinese government could assess whether a vulnerability would be useful in intelligence operations.

As the Access Now article explains, the Chinese authorities have gone beyond simply keeping zero-days quiet for as long as possible. They are actively discouraging Chinese white hats from participating in international hacking competitions because this would help Western companies learn about bugs that might otherwise be exploitable by China's intelligence services. This is really bad news for the rest of us. It means that China's huge and growing pool of expert coders are no longer likely to report bugs to software companies when they find them. Instead, they will be passed to the CNNVD for assessment. Not only will bug fixes take longer to appear, exposing users to security risks, but the Chinese may even weaponize the zero-days in order to break into other systems.

Another regrettable aspect of this development is that Western countries like the US and UK can hardly point fingers here, since they have been using zero-days in precisely this way for years. The fact that China -- and presumably Russia, North Korea and Iran amongst others -- have joined the club underlines what a stupid move this was. It may have provided a short-term advantage for the West, but now that it's become the norm for intelligence agencies, the long-term effect is to reduce the security of computer systems everywhere by leaving known vulnerabilities unpatched. It's an unwinnable digital arms race that will be hard to stop now. It also underlines why adding any kind of weakness to cryptographic systems would be an incredibly reckless escalation of an approach that has already put lives at risk.

Follow me @glynmoody on Twitter or identi.ca, and +glynmoody on Google+

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Filed Under: china, cybersecurity, disclosure, intelligence, nsa, security, surveillance, vulnerabilities, zero days


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  1. icon
    Ninja (profile), 24 Sep 2018 @ 12:08pm

    Part of me thinks every govt is doing it for ages now. The other part thinks the US opened the floodgates and we are going to suffer because of it.

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