Uphill Effort To Reverse Net Neutrality Repeal Has The Early Votes

from the reverse-the-reversal dept

As we've been tracking, there are several routes net neutrality advocates should support if they want to reverse the FCC's attack on net neutrality. The best path forward remains with the courts, where the FCC will need to explain why it ignored the public, the experts, 1,000 startups, and all objective data as it rushed to give a sloppy kiss to Comcast, AT&T and Verizon. It will also need to explain why it made up a DDOS attack and blocked a law enforcement investigation into rampant comment fraud during the proceeding; both apparently ham-fisted attempts to downplay legitimate public opposition to the plan.

But we've also noted how there's an effort afoot by net neutrality advocates and Senator Ed Markey to use the Congressional Review Act to overturn the FCC's vote. Under the CRA, Congress can overturn a regulatory action with a majority vote if the Act is used within 60 days of said action. It's what the Trump administration and the GOP used early last year to kill broadband privacy protections before they were scheduled to take effect.

Bringing such a vote to the floor requires at least 30 members of the Senate, something net neutrality advocates now have with the new support of Claire McCaskill:

And while net neutrality supporters are enthusiastic about the CRA route, even with these votes it has a steep, uphill climb to success. The CRA reversal would require the signature of President Trump, which isn't going to happen. And getting House floor time for a comparable vote is likely untenable given the steeper GOP majority in the house. As we've long noted, this binary thinking of net neutrality as a partisan issue is a disservice to the public, since the vast majority of voters support net neutrality and opposed the FCC's handout to industry.

That said, there's still real value in forcing Comcast-loyal lawmakers to put their disdain for the public down on the permanent record. Especially given the looming midterms, when countless politicians will have to explain (espcially to more tech-savvy Millennial voters) why they chose to ignore the will of the public just so Comcast, AT&T and Verizon could explore new, creative ways of screwing over small businesses, startups, consumers, and the health of the internet.

Filed Under: congress, congressional review act, cra, fcc, net neutrality


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  1. icon
    XcOM987 (profile), 9 Jan 2018 @ 6:57am

    Re:

    The biggest problem with this is the state protection law's which have been shown to be nothing but bad for consumers and some times even written by ISP's time and time again.

    You now have ISP's that feel that the rules should be goverened at a state level when they are trying to push back at federal rules but at the same time say they states shouldn't be allowed to write these rules when all of a sudden the states in question are trying to protect consumers.

    As someone who is on the outside looking in being from over the pond, I genuinly wonder why people are allowed to get away with this, it's not even subtle, the only way you can call it subtle is if you were to descibe it as being as subtle as a sledge hammer!

    I know people don't like regulation, and people say regulation won't work in the internet/ISP world, well a good chunk of the world would beg to differ, where I live which is a village, we have 1 main provider that maintains the lines, then all other ISP's can use these lines to see broadband, and because of this we have lots of competition, I can't remember the last time I saw an ISP in the UK offer limited connections or caps, they are all pretty much unlimited, I reguarly hit 1tb a month due to streaming all my content from Netflix, Amazon and such.

    it's going to be hard to take down the few ISP's that are around as they have soo much power and many people don't have much choice in the matter, but somthing needs to be done soon, I can't see people putting up with this for much longer, as people become more tech savy I hope they will be grilled on their tech policies.


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