Keep The Internet Competitive And Innovative: Speak Out Now

from the here's-your-chance dept

Post sponsored by

Application Developers Alliance

There are only two weeks left to submit your comments. Act soon to ensure your voice is heard!

The European Commission needs our help. As the EC considers the future of innovation policy, they need — and want — to hear from you. To make sure the Commission doesn’t create any unintended harmful consequences, they have asked for our opinion, and the opinion of anyone that could and would be impacted by changes to internet regulation in the European Union. The Copia Institute has set up a great site for gathering this information: Don't Wreck The Net. Take a moment and share your thoughts. In the meantime, here are some of ours.

The Application Developers Alliance is a membership organization representing nearly 200 companies and over 60,000 developers — many of them small companies and entrepreneurs. It is these companies that drive innovation and grow the economy. But like you, they have neither the time nor the money to lobby the government, and we want to make sure you are aware of how this consultation could end up impacting these businesses, innovation generally, and you specifically.

Many policymakers (and reporters) seem to focus on the big players and how different types of internet regulation would impact them, but we are much more concerned about the impact on everyone else. Let's face it, the largest companies have the resources and legal experts to deal with whatever regulatory burden is put on their shoulders, but the early stage companies and small app developers do not. Here are four key reasons why we think it is important to tell European regulators Don't Wreck The Net:

  1. More competition: The EU Commission wants to see more competition in the market, but creating more regulations and red tape will not achieve that. As noted above, these regulations are only likely to entrench the large players who have the resources to deal with those burdens. Small upstarts could end up going out of business or not get started in the first place. In order to gain more competition, we need to tell the Commission not to add an extra regulatory burden.
  2. More innovation: The history of technological progress — especially on the internet — is driven by "permissionless innovation." So much innovation happens because a small group of people (or even an individual!) has a great idea and can just run with it, without having to "get approval." Increasing regulation, whether on purpose or not, often results in having to make sure your innovation "gets permission" in the form of compliance — which might also limit certain kinds of useful innovations.
  3. Forced user monitoring isn't helpful for anyone: Like you, we are concerned about user privacy and we take this issue very seriously. We want to ensure that users are protected and we do not want proposed legislation to require much more monitoring of user behaviour. Not only would this require massive resources for small developers, it would put user privacy at risk.
  4. Freedom of speech: Many of the regulatory suggestions on the table could inadvertently hold back free expression, and move the internet to more of a "broadcast" model, with only approved content going through. We believe in freedom of speech and how that helps power the internet and the apps that our members develop. The internet and mobile networks are, at their heart, communications platforms. They have grown and developed because they are tools for free expression and limiting this fundamental right would not only hold back innovation, but everyone's ability to communicate as well.

For those reasons and more, we support the Copia Institute's campaign to tell the EU Commission Don't Wreck The Net, and we recommend you check out Copia's Survey Survival Guide to help take you through the consultation. The form can seem complicated, but we believe it is worth letting the EU know how you feel about this and its impact on future innovations.


This post is sponsored by the Application Developers Alliance in support of Don't Wreck The Net

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Filed Under: competition, don't wreck the net, eu, eu commission, free speech, innovation, intermediary liability, platforms, privacy


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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 16 Dec 2015 @ 7:37am

    Will this be the new future for techdirt? Sponsored stories and native ads?

    Seems far from the whole "advertising is content" approach. This is just Selling out

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 16 Dec 2015 @ 8:22am

      Re:

      None of us like stealth advertising, but this seems like a very legitimate message from a legitimate organization.

      Presumably the term "sponsored by" means a paid advertisement that is not proof-read, reviewed, approved, or endorsed in any way.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Mike Masnick (profile), 16 Dec 2015 @ 9:28am

      Re:

      Will this be the new future for techdirt? Sponsored stories and native ads?


      We've done these for years. In fact, some of our most popular stories have been sponsored posts. We always work to make sure that the content is relevant and good content as well. In this case, that's especially true. It is a sponsored post, but it's in support of a project by our think tank, the Copia Institute, and the content is clearly relevant for the Techdirt audience.

      And of course, it is all clearly marked and disclosed. I'm not quite sure what your complaint is. If this post were NOT a sponsored post, I still think the content would fit right in with Techdirt's regular content -- which is what makes it good "advertising is content." It's about policies designed to impact the internet, privacy, competition and innovation. It's about a project that we did ourselves.

      Seems far from the whole "advertising is content" approach.

      Actually, seems exactly like "advertising is content." It's relevant, useful content, that also is sponsored. I'm still confused what the complaint is other than an allergic reaction to anything being "sponsored" in any way.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 16 Dec 2015 @ 12:53pm

        Re: Re:

        "sponsored posts. We always work to make sure that the content is relevant and good content as well."

        That's welcome and commendable. Techdirt's sponsored articles are not a problem in the least. There needs be more of them. The problem is the 'daily deal' posts that feature products from companies whose ethical values are the opposite of everything Techdirt stands for, along with a general lack of proper disclosure for these products. Techdirt is in a prime position to clean up many common (but shady) industry practices.

        For instance, software EULAs have traditionally been hidden inside the box, trapping unsuspecting buyers. But it doesn't have to be that way. Why not insist that StackSocial reveal all EULAs, TOSs, DRMs, and other contracts/restrictions of user rights up front, before they buy the product? It would not be hard to do, and would go a long way toward promoting the concepts of honesty, fairness and full disclosure.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 16 Dec 2015 @ 7:39am

    Can i block sponsorer stories? I prefer not to read stories they have to pay people to show

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 16 Dec 2015 @ 8:14am

      Re:

      They have posted these before but the stories only align with Tech Dirt's goals. I think it is a great option for the staff at Tech Dirt supplement their pay. They have to make money to stay online. It also in't one of those annoying click bait adds so many other sites post. Or are you one of those people who think that other people shouldn't be paid for their work?

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      That One Guy (profile), 16 Dec 2015 @ 8:40am

      Re:

      So don't. The 'Post sponsored by' icon is clearly visible at the top, just pass over any articles with that and you'll be good.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 16 Dec 2015 @ 12:03pm

      Re:

      Sure you can! You simply need to only scroll exactly 1 post past any clearly marked sponsored post.

      Content filtering has never been so easy!

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Wendy Cockcroft, 18 Dec 2015 @ 2:46am

      Re:

      Mike is working on ways to make Techdirt pay for itself so he can pay his staff. Is that not reasonable? Sponsored posts are often very informative and I for one appreciate Mike being transparent about this.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 16 Dec 2015 @ 8:06am

    Sponsered stories are fine

    They are clearly advertising it so there is nothing wrong here in my opinion.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 17 Dec 2015 @ 9:16am

    The more i keep reading and reading and reading, about more and more and more authority, the more i think a whole bunch of people need firing ......globally

    But alas, to big to fire, thought by many, that many, but not by me

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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