Hundreds Of Journalists, Researchers, Concerned Citizens Sign Letter Protesting Netzpolitik 'Treason' Investigation

from the sign-the-letter dept

We've written a few times now about how the news site Netzpolitik has been investigated for treason for reporting on some efforts to expand German internet surveillance. The site published the leaked documents supporting that claim, which would be clearly protected by the First Amendment here in the US. However, in Germany, it resulted in a treason investigation... and widespread protests as people are quite rightly concerned about the chilling effects of targeting journalists. There's also been some political mudslinging as there's been some debate over whether or not the investigation should move forward.

Now a bunch of people (including me) have signed an open letter protesting the investigation. The statement is quite short and to the point:
"The investigation against Netzpolitik.org for treason and their unknown sources is an attack against the free press. Charges of treason against journalists performing their essential work is a violation of the fifth article of the German constitution. We demand an end to the investigation into Netzpolitik.org and their unknown sources."
You can also see the statement in a variety of other languages as well. The statement has received many hundreds of signatures already and you can add your name as well.
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Filed Under: free speech, germany, journalism, surveillance, treason, whistleblower
Companies: netzpolitik


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  1. identicon
    David, 6 Aug 2015 @ 5:37am

    Re: Re: Re: What Constitution?

    "Grundgesetz" does, however, translate into "Constitution" in English.

    Wrong. The word for "Constitution" is "Verfassung". Indeed, "Artikel 146" of the Grundgesetz states that the Grundgesetz will lose its validity on the day the Germans choose to pass a "Verfassung".

    The Grundgesetz was written after WWII for West Germany on order of the allied forces as a temporary substitute for a proper Verfassung. It's been doing a pretty good job and people have become used to it, so nobody could be bothered actually following through with creating a formal Constitution to supersede it.

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