In Wake Of NSA Leaks, China Drops Major US Tech Companies From Its Approved Supplier List

from the leaks-docs,-leaking-dollars dept

The NSA continues to "save" the United States from terrorism by making it weaker. Not only has the agency actively undermined encryption standards, but its willingness to insert backdoors and spyware in any piece of hardware or software it can get its hands on has severely damaged the world's trust of American technology.

Cloud computing providers have already felt the aftershocks of the Snowden leaks. An Open Technology Institute report published a year after the first revelation noted that many had already seen a drop-off in sales and predicted that the backlash against the NSA's surveillance tactics could cost companies anywhere from $22-180 billion over the next three years.

Hardware makers are getting hit hard as well. One of the largest buyers of American tech products has dropped some very big brands from its approved supplier list.
China has dropped some of the world's leading technology brands from its approved state purchase lists, while approving thousands more locally made products, in what some say is a response to revelations of widespread Western cybersurveillance.

Chief casualty is U.S. network equipment maker Cisco Systems Inc, which in 2012 counted 60 products on the Central Government Procurement Center's (CGPC) list, but by late 2014 had none, a Reuters analysis of official data shows.

Smartphone and PC maker Apple Inc has also been dropped over the period, along with Intel Corp's security software firm McAfee and network and server software firm Citrix Systems.
It's certainly no surprise that Cisco would be one of the first dropped by foreign purchasers wary of NSA meddling. A leaked document detailing the agency's hardware interdiction program contained a photo of operatives carefully unwrapping a box full of hardware destined for NSA spyware implants. While the faces of the agents may have been blurred, the logo on the box was not. As the story spread across the internet, one conclusion was drawn: Cisco products are not "safe."

The fact that foreign hardware may arrive loaded with spyware and backdoors isn't the only thing prompting the Chinese government to drop nearly half of its overseas security-related tech suppliers. There's also the ongoing tension between the US and China, which has devolved into each country accusing the other of inserting backdoors into exported tech. It appears both sets of accusations are correct, but for years it was largely assumed that China was mostly alone in these efforts.

China also has a domestic market it would like to expand, which will now get a leg up from the government. As it eyes an increased exports, it is likely aware that many foreign governments and other potential purchasers consider its exports no more "secure" than NSA-infected tech shipping from the US. Purchasers will find themselves taking the "lesser of two evils" approach when seeking to obtain tech products -- something that won't always work out in favor of American companies.

Cisco has openly stated that "geopolitical concerns" -- like the NSA's interception of its products destined for foreign markets -- have led to a downturn in sales. Other affected companies like Intel have yet to issue official statements detailing any NSA-related impact on their sales, but it's clear the last 18 months of leaks have done little to raise their future expectations. OTI's wide-open estimate on potential losses will probably never achieve sharper focus. It's unlikely former customers are going to clearly state that unrenewed contracts or supplier list culls are due to the NSA's actions, but surveys have indicated this concern does factor heavily into purchasing decisions.

The leaks aren't going to stop, and what is already in the public domain will continue to take its toll. Just as certainly, the NSA isn't going to stop looking for ways to circumvent encryption or compromise hardware. At this point, there's no way any company can claim with certainty that they have avoided becoming part of any government's intelligence apparatus -- and that's going to hurt them for years to come.

Filed Under: china, nsa, privacy, surveillance, tech industry


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  1. icon
    musterion (profile), 27 Feb 2015 @ 7:12am

    Lenovo anyone

    Considering the spyware that Lenovo loads onto its systems, and you know damn well that as a computer manufacturer theyu are under the scrutiny if the Communist party and government, why would anyone in the west buy any of their stuff? It works both ways.

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