Rep. Mike Rogers, On His Way Out Of Congress, Slams Obama For Not Launching Premature Cyberwar Against North Korea

from the and-for-not-giving-his-precious-nsa-your-data dept

Rep. Mike Rogers is just about out of Congress, but the NSA's biggest defender (despite his supposed role in "overseeing" the agency) is using his last days on Capitol Hill to keep pushing his favorite causes. Over the weekend, he complained that President Obama basically should have gone to "cyberwar" with North Korea over the Sony hack.
“Unfortunately, he’s laid out a little of the playbook,” Rogers said. “That press conference should have been here are the actions.” ...

Without discussing specifics, Rogers said the U.S. has the capability to cripple North Korea’s cyberattack capabilities, which have been rapidly improving over the last few years.

“I can tell you we have the capability to make this very difficult for them in the future,” he said.
And I can tell you that Mike Rogers is full of bluster with little basis. First off, there is still some fairly strong skepticism in the actual computer security field that North Korea was behind the hack. Launching an all out attack without more proof would seem premature. Second, Rogers is simply wrong or clueless. We don't have the capability to "cripple" anyone's "cyberattack capabilities" unless he means taking out the entire internet. There are always ways around that. Even the reports that we've seen that do blame North Korea don't seem to think the full attack came from North Korea, so doing something like taking the few internet connections in North Korea off the map wouldn't do much good if the actual attack came from, say, China or Eastern Europe or somewhere else.

Third, can we just get over this ridiculous idea that a hack of one company, which may or may not have been by actors working for a government, is an act of either "terrorism" or "war." It's not. It's a hack. Tons of companies get hacked every day. Some have good security and still get hacked. Some, like Sony, appear to have terrible security and get hacked very easily. It's not terrorism. It's not war. It's a hack. We shouldn't be talking about retaliation or destroying countries over a hack. We should be talking about better security. Jim Harper does a good job explaining why an overreaction is a bad idea:
The greatest risk in all this is that loose talk of terrorism and “cyberwar” lead nations closer to actual war. Having failed to secure its systems, Sony has certainly lost a lot of money and reputation, but for actual damage to life and limb, you ain’t seen nothing like real war. It is not within well-drawn boundaries of U.S. national security interests to avenge wrongs to U.S. subsidiaries of Japanese corporations. Governments in the United States should respond to the Sony hack with nothing more than ordinary policing and diplomacy.
But, no, not Mike Rogers. Instead, he's using this as his opportunity to push for his favorite bad law: giving the NSA more power to sift through your data:
Rogers, who is retiring from Congress in just a few days, made a final plug for his bill to facilitate cybersecurity information sharing between the private sector and National Security Agency (NSA). The measure passed the House, but stalled in the Senate, held up by privacy concerns.

It’s necessary, Rogers argued, if the U.S. wants to protect itself from similar attacks in the future. Because of laws on the books, the NSA is limited in its ability to protect private critical infrastructure networks.

“This isn’t about reading your email, it’s about reading malicious source code,” Rogers said.
He's talking, of course, about his beloved CISPA, which would effectively remove any liability from companies for sharing your private data with the NSA (and the rest of the government). But, as per usual with Rogers, he's wrong about nearly all of the details. There is nothing in CISPA that would have made it so the NSA could have "protected" Sony. Sony's problem here was Sony's terrible computer security. So, no, we don't need CISPA or other cybersecurity legislation to better protect the internet.

And is Mike Rogers really trying to argue that Sony's private intranet is "critical infrastructure"?

Finally, there's nothing in the law today that stops a company from sharing "malicious source code" with the government or others. We already have a good way for dealing with that that doesn't require a new law that gives the NSA more access to everyone's data.

Either way, it looks like Rogers is going out in typical fashion -- shooting his mouth off in favor of his friends and pet projects, without actually understanding or caring about the details. No wonder he's going into AM talk radio. He'll be a perfect fit.

Filed Under: cispa, cyber terrorism, cyberwar, exaggerations, mike rogers, north korea, sony hack, terrorism, war


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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:25am

    Nothing in the law?

    "Finally, there's nothing in the law today that stops a company from sharing "malicious source code" with the government or others."

    Ahem. Except perhaps copyright. Even if it's malicious, it's still covered by copyright... I'm waiting for the day one of these hackers comes forth and claims statutory damages from reverse-engineered malware.

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    • icon
      Chronno S. Trigger (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:32am

      Re: Nothing in the law?

      I'm fairly sure a federal investigation is covered under fair use.

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      • icon
        ltlw0lf (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 12:09pm

        Re: Re: Nothing in the law?

        I'm fairly sure a federal investigation is covered under fair use.

        IANAL, but I am pretty sure the federal government cannot be sued unless the federal government allows someone to sue them, and there is a very limited number of reasons the government can be sued.

        A person claiming copyright on malware would have to submit their complaint within three years to the United States Court of Federal Claims. I suspect that would seriously cut back the number of claimants.

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        • icon
          R.H. (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 4:52pm

          Re: Re: Re: Nothing in the law?

          The federal government wouldn't be doing the infringing though. The infringing party would be whomever provided the copy of the code to the government from their own systems. That's who would be sued under this extremely unlikely scenario.

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          • icon
            ltlw0lf (profile), 23 Dec 2014 @ 8:09am

            Re: Re: Re: Re: Nothing in the law?

            The infringing party would be whomever provided the copy of the code to the government from their own systems.

            Yeah, but that party probably wouldn't have as much money as the government. In tort lawsuits, you don't sue the person who did you wrong...you sue the one that has the deepest pockets, right?

            Besides, it may be extremely difficult figuring out what party gave the government the malware, considering the anonymity and secrecy of the process. You'd have to deal with FOIA and/or suing the agency to get the name of the party that gave the government the malware. I believe an active/ongoing legal investigation and/or national security are valid reasons to reject a FOIA request.

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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:26am

    "Tons of companies get hacked every day."

    True, but how many hacks are accompanied with threats of physical violence against innocent persons?

    Clearly you do not like Rogers, but that is no good reason to take his comments and present them with a spin that does not reflect the context of what was actually said. You are sounding much, much more like an partisan advocate than a journalist.

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    • icon
      jupiterkansas (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:35am

      Re:

      Then complain about the threats of violence, not the hacking.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:35am

      Re:

      NK's first response to everything is to threaten violence. That's just NK's opening negotiation and diplomacy tactic.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      John Fenderson (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:37am

      Re:

      I'm not sure I see how the existence of such threats changes anything at all regarding this point. The Sony hack was just that -- a hack. Even if North Korea did it (which I think is more doubtful now than ever), it's hardly something that should be responded to on a war footing. It's just a hack against a single company, and a relatively unimportant hack at that.

      This looks for all the world like Rogers (and, presumably, the cadre he runs around with) looking for any possible excuse to get into a war.

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      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:28am

        Re: Re:

        Conspiracy theorists might even suggest this hack was staged to help push through some otherwise-unnecessary legislation...

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        • icon
          John Fenderson (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:31am

          Re: Re: Re:

          That's just silly speculation, though, for two reasons: first, there is no evidence to suggest that and second, there's no need to stage such a hack. Worse hacks happen every day anyway. All that would be needed is to pick one and harp about it endlessly in the media. Which is, in my opinion, exactly what happened.

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    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:42am

      Re:

      The context is that Rogers has consistenhtlyand vehemently lied about this kind of thing before, possibly intentionally.

      So, yes, I think it is reasonable to read into those comments a negative outcome.

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    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:55am

      Re:

      Threats of violence are now considered a National Security issue? Come One... they may be a law enforcement issue, but not National Security.

      This is a private company that was hacked and nothing more. the rest is just empty threats unless there is some kind of evidence to the contrary.

      Masnick may have a beef with Rodgers, but his article is on point.

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    • icon
      Mike Masnick (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:19am

      Re:

      True, but how many hacks are accompanied with threats of physical violence against innocent persons?


      If we're talking about totally bullshit, almost certainly without the capability to back it up, threats associated with hacks? An awful lot.

      Clearly you do not like Rogers, but that is no good reason to take his comments and present them with a spin that does not reflect the context of what was actually said.

      Feel free to put them back into context, because I'm pretty sure I've accurately represented them.

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      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 12:36pm

        Re: Re:

        I take it you would have played the movie without any concern about the threat of violence. That would have placed you in the distinct minority.

        As for accuracy, perhaps you can point to something said by Rogers that openly advocated for a "cyber war". I could find any such comment. I did read a comment by him critical of "proportionate response", but anyone who has followed international issues of late understands it is a term that has been used in the past to express anger with no subsequent overt act to hold the wrongdoer accountable in any meaningful manner.

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        • identicon
          Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 12:43pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          Should read "I could not find any such comment."

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        • icon
          John Fenderson (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 1:07pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          "I take it you would have played the movie without any concern about the threat of violence."

          Personally, I certainly would have. The only thing more stupid than the threats was than anyone paid attention to them at all.

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        • identicon
          Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 1:27pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          I take it you would have played the movie without any concern about the threat of violence. That would have placed you in the distinct minority.

          I for one absolutely would have played the movie. This is supposed to be the land of the free and home of the brave.

          Unfortunately, it seems to be neither.

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          • identicon
            Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 2:08pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re:

            Most people likely agree with what you and another commenter have said, but then again I rather doubt you or he or they have the responsibility of owning and operating a movie theater or other large public venue. I share your sentiment as well, but cannot say with any degree of certainty that if I was the one running a theater and responsible for the safety of my customers that I would have bucked the trend and shown the movie anyway.

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            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 2:38pm

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

              Most people likely agree with...
              More Americans disapprove of Sony film cancellation: Reuters/Ipsos poll”, by Mary Milliken, Reuters, Dec 22, 2014
              • Forty-seven percent of respondents said...
              • Another 29 percent of those polled said...

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            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 5:15pm

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

              Are you really expecting a severely impoverished country to be so capable of deploying an information network to see exactly who watched the movie, and where, and individually track them down? Really?

              Nobody believes you, Slonecker. It's obvious you're really just in it to rag on Masnick.

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            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 8:41pm

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

              ... if I was the one running a theater...
              Theater owners pleaded with Sony to consider a limited release of ‘The Interview’ ”, by Cecilia Kang, Washington Post, Dec 22, 2014
              Several major and independent theaters pleaded with Sony Pictures Entertainment to consider limited distribution of the film but were rejected by the movie studio, according to a source familiar with the talks. . . .

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            • identicon
              Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 6:45am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

              So lemme get this straight - a nation state that can barely feed its own people, where electricity is a luxury, and the entire country's Internet access is fed via 4 links is capable or wreaking havoc on one of the most powerful nations on earth?

              If that's truly the case, then the entire security theater we're spending ridiculous amounts of money on SUCKS, and everyone involved needs to be fired for gross incompetence.

              I go back to my original comment - this is CLEARLY not the land of the free and home of the brave if you're so ready to let North Korea dictate what we can and cannot show in theaters.

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            • icon
              Mike Masnick (profile), 23 Dec 2014 @ 10:31am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

              Most people likely agree with what you and another commenter have said, but then again I rather doubt you or he or they have the responsibility of owning and operating a movie theater or other large public venue. I share your sentiment as well, but cannot say with any degree of certainty that if I was the one running a theater and responsible for the safety of my customers that I would have bucked the trend and shown the movie anyway.

              It would appear that many theater owners disagree with you. And they do own theaters. A few examples:

              http://www.vox.com/2014/12/23/7441153/alamo-drafthouse-interview
              http://www.theguardian.com/ books/2014/dec/22/george-rr-martin-the-interview-sony-pictures-hack-north-korea
              http://variety.com/20 14/film/news/the-interview-christmas-day-screenings-new-release-1201386144/
              http://adage.com/article/ media/independent-theaters-offer-show-sony-s-interview/296407/

              Of course, getting you to admit that you were full of shit will never happen, because it never does. As always, you put in enough weasel words to weasel your way out of being proven wrong, so go ahead, weasel away about how you never said what you clearly implied.

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              • identicon
                Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 12:18pm

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                Obama Is Pals With Sony Executive He Said Never Called”, by Julie Bykowicz, Bloomberg, Dec 23, 2014
                ... Sony Pictures CEO Michael Lynton is one of the president's most reliable campaign donors, but the relationship is deeper than that: He and his wife, Jamie Alter Lynton, have visited the White House a dozen times and even vacationed with the Obamas.... Few companies, it turns out, would have been in a better position to make a phone call to the president....

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                • identicon
                  Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 1:06pm

                  Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                  Few companies, it turns out, would have been in a better position to make a phone call to the president.”

                  Sony Pictures CEO Michael Lynton 'We did not cave' ”, CNN, Dec 21, 2014
                   . . . .

                  ZAKARIA: So the president is wrong when he says that you did not reach out to him?

                  LYNTON: Well, I don't - what - when he's asking about reaching out...

                  ZAKARIA: "I wish they had talked to me first," is the - is the...

                  LYNTON: Right. So we definitely spoke to senior adviser or a senior adviser in the White House to talk about the situation. The fact is, did we talk to the president himself and - and talk to him about what was happening - transpiring as the theaters started pulling back and not - and - and being unwilling to distribute the movie? No. But the White House was certainly aware of the situation.

                   . . . .

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              • identicon
                Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 1:07pm

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                So a few theater owners have just come forward a said they would show the movie, that does not change one iota the fact that the majors have not as yet stepped up. I expect that eventually a majority of theaters will express solidarity with the notion that theaters in the US will show what they darn well please, but right now it is only a minority notion.

                Now please feel free to cite in yet another invective-laden comment more articles that did not exist at the time I happened to first comment.

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                • identicon
                  Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 1:34pm

                  Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                  ... the majors have not as yet stepped up.
                  Sony Pictures moves to release 'The Interview' in about-face”, by Eric Kelsey and David Brunnstrom, Reuters, Dec 23, 2014
                   . . . .It remained unclear how many theaters would be allowed to screen the film and if major movie chains would reverse course and join the group of authorized exhibitors. . . .

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                • icon
                  Mike Masnick (profile), 24 Dec 2014 @ 5:46am

                  Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                  So a few theater owners have just come forward a said they would show the movie, that does not change one iota the fact that the majors have not as yet stepped up.

                  Tell me, did it hurt your back to move those goalposts all by yourself?

                  Now please feel free to cite in yet another invective-laden comment more articles that did not exist at the time I happened to first comment.

                  Actually, both Tim League and George RR Martin had made their comments wishing to show the movie prior to your comments, but I don't expect you to bother with facts as you dig deeper into the muck insisting that you were right when, in fact, you were wrong.

                  Do you ever get tired of playing this game. Just once, it would be grand for you to admit being wrong so frequently in your attempts to discredit us.

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                  • identicon
                    Anonymous Coward, 24 Dec 2014 @ 6:24am

                    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                    You discredit yourself without my help by your apparent steadfast refusal to independently verify many of the assertions of fact made in articles you author. This is the danger of reliance upon hearsay.

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                    • identicon
                      Anonymous Coward, 24 Dec 2014 @ 8:39am

                      Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                      This is the danger of reliance upon hearsay.
                      Japan, wary of North Korea, works to secure infrastructure after Sony attack”, by Tim Kelly and Nobuhiro Kubo, Chicago Tribune (Reuters), Dec 24, 2014
                       . . . The parent company was "bolstering communication" among Chief Executive Kazuo Hirai, Sony Pictures Entertainment Chief Executive Michael Lynton, Nicole Seligman, who is president of Sony Corporation of America, and Chief Information Security Officer John Scimone, the company source said. . . .


                      “I say to Creighton Sahib, ‘This is not a lawsuit, that we go about to collect evidence.’ ” ——Hurree Chunder Mookerjee

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                    • icon
                      Mike Masnick (profile), 24 Dec 2014 @ 11:06am

                      Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                      This is the danger of reliance upon hearsay.

                      Says the guy who REGULARLY makes assertions of fact that turn out to be flat out wrong. Including in this thread.

                      Don't make me laugh.

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        • icon
          techflaws (profile), 23 Dec 2014 @ 2:07am

          Re: Re: Re:

          That would have placed you in the distinct minority.

          Says you based on what numbers/evidence?

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          • identicon
            Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 6:40am

            Re: Re: Re: Re:

            Well...just how many theaters showed or are showing the film? I am not aware of any, but then I do not claim to have infallible information in hand.

            Importantly, my comment was directed to a comment by the author of this article. It is such an easy thing to say without equivocation what one would do when one is not in a position where their neck is on the line, legally or otherwise. An honest answer would have been "I likely would have shown it had I had a copy of the film in hand, but to be honest I do not have all the relevant information in hand that would let me assess the pros and cons of showing the film for my customers and my business." Yes, this is not a utopian ideal answer. It is, however, a reality of competing interests that every business owner must consider.

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            • icon
              John Fenderson (profile), 23 Dec 2014 @ 7:26am

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

              " An honest answer would have been "I likely would have shown it had I had a copy of the film in hand, but to be honest I do not have all the relevant information in hand that would let me assess the pros and cons of showing the film for my customers and my business.""

              I actually think that we do have all the relevant information to assess the pros and cons. I would have shown the movie, and I think that the theaters that balked are not only cowardly, but engaged in yet another small act of degradation of our society.

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              • identicon
                Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 7:55am

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                If you really believe you have all the relevant information, then you have access to sources of information denied to almost everyone else. You have detailed information concerning the alleged threat made if the film was shown? You have access to the myriad of theater owners who had planned on showing the film? You have access to information concerning legal liability should, Heaven forbid, the worst came to fruition? You have access to the contracts between the studio and the theaters? Etc., etc., etc.

                No, what you have is a personal opinion that reflects a utopian ideal. This does not mean your opinion is without merit, but only that criticizing others who apparently did not act in accordance with your opinion is not good form.

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                • icon
                  John Fenderson (profile), 23 Dec 2014 @ 8:17am

                  Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                  Of the items you list, the only one that's really relevant is the contract between theaters and studio - and we can infer enough from that by the fact that it wasn't Sony's desire to avoid showing the film.

                  "No, what you have is a personal opinion that reflects a utopian ideal."

                  A personal opinion, certainly. A utopian ideal, not even close.

                  "that criticizing others who apparently did not act in accordance with your opinion is not good form."

                  So if my opinion is that the theater operators are behaving in a cowardly fashion that is counter to the public interest, it's bad form to speak that opinion? That's an interesting perspective.

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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:33am

    OMG! Cyberattack

    North Korea’s Internet link is flaky today”, North Korea Tech, Dec 22, 2014
    ... “I haven’t seen such a steady beat of routing instability and outages in KP before,” said Doug Madory, director of Internet analysis at Dyn Research. “Usually there are isolated blips, not continuous connectivity problems. I wouldn’t be surprised if they are absorbing some sort of attack presently.”...


    (H/T “North Korea's internet appears to be under mass cyber attack”, by Max Fisher, Vox, Dec 22, 2014)

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  • icon
    That Anonymous Coward (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:36am

    Because going to war has worked out so well for us.

    The war to end all wars was fought twice.
    The war on drugs has done nothing but enrich a few.
    The war on terror has shown that we can be worse than those we call terrorist.
    A cyberwar will do nothing but funnel more money and resources into something endless that will serve no actual purpose. It will escalate from tit for tat, until someone decides that isn't enough and there must be blood shed to prove they are the best.

    He is a moron, he will not be missed. His desire for a more fearful populace beholden to the snake oil saviors, paying them protection money for the magic rock that repels tigers, made the entire world worse off. He is a prime example of someone more beholden to corporate bottom lines than representing those who elected him to make their lives better. He would burn allow the public to be crushed in his rush to shovel more money into the corporate coffers.

    I look forward to seeing which corporate sponsor takes him on, so we can see how little it cost to subvert the ideals of a nation.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      JEDIDIAH, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:41am

      The revolution will not be televised.

      The problem with his bluster is that a "cyberwar" is perhaps something that you do NOT want to advertise. Unless he's suggesting a format declaration of war an everything, it is perhaps best that we don't advertise the fact that we are going to be engaging in dirty tricks outside of some formal declaration.

      Cyberwar is more like espionage than conventional warfare.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:04am

      Re:

      Angry .. very very Angry. Need a Holiday hug?

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        techflaws (profile), 23 Dec 2014 @ 2:12am

        Re: Re:

        Why don't you ask those cowards that are responsible for his justified anger? Or did you just completely fail a trolling?

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 4:30am

          Re: Re: Re:

          I don't need to ask them. I vote them out of office, that's how I get my voice heard. I've long since stopped getting mad at these crooks.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      PRMan, 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:04am

      Re:

      The war on drugs has done much more than nothing but enrich a few. Right or wrong, it has made the US the country with the highest prison population on earth.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 1:09pm

      Re:

      ...The war to end all wars was fought twice...

      What we call the First World War was billed as "the war to end all wars". Who called the Second World War a war to end all wars?

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      That Anonymous Coward (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 3:11pm

      Re:

      Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu
      I accidentally a phrase in there. The mind, it moves faster than the hands.

      And yes, I am angry.
      I am angry that a loudmouth elected leader is so selfcentered that he has to push his pet project as being the be all end all of it.
      Congress has done fuckall, beyond give themselves another entitlement for $1000 a month so they can ride in luxury, while people are homeless, starving, dying of illnesses, and a whole host of issues that they can't bring themselves to address because the soundbite looks bad... but have no problems blaming the poor for being poor and asking for help.

      Meh war to end all wars, it sounded good at the time.

      We have imprisoned more people to enrich corporations, society is falling apart as more and more people are funneled into jail.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 4:52am

        Re: Re:

        "And yes, I am angry."

        You should point your anger at the sheeple that put these idiots in office. They are the crooks.....Republicans, Democrats, all crooks...

        Politicians in the U.S. are doing at least one of three things with your money at all times. 1. taking your money and giving it to corporate interests. 2. taking your money and giving it to someone less fortunate (preferably one registered to vote) 3. taking your money and putting it in their pocket.

        Power corrupts, we say this all the time, but we never do anything about it. We've centralized the power base to a collection of politicians that can't get to where they are without either being corrupt, or being corruptible. Both the people and business demand it, an honest man doesn't stand a chance.

        So basically, IMHO, you have two choices. You can either get rid of them (short term solution.. till the next crook shows up) or change the system so this stops happening... either way we get the Government we deserve.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          Socrates, 23 Dec 2014 @ 1:01pm

          Election fraud

          You should point your anger at the sheeple that put these idiots in office. They are the crooks.....Republicans, Democrats, all crooks...


          The election fraud in USA is massive. And it have been a scam for a long time. Even the nomination elections is scams, with telepromted live results, slanting curves based on district size (to avoid a negative number of votes as result of the scam), and so on. They are not sheeple for voting stupid (though that is bad enough), they are sheeple because the entire election is just a joke.

          Notice what happened when delegates from Maine discovered just how corrupt the RNC were ... nothing. And what happened when the earlier scam system produced negative votes ... nothing. And what happend when it were proved to be a systematic pattern ... nothing.

          The population is played.

          Much in the same way that it is played to not focus on attorney general Jim Hood and Sony/MPAA wrongdoings. It is enough to point at North Korea and they happily go brain-dead.

          To take their democracy back the citizens must organize elections. Though in USA even post-polls meet resistance. So I predict the US populace do what they do best ... nothing. And perhaps pay Sony money to endure a movie so the perpetrators can have someone to laugh at.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    beltorak (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:42am

    "Damnit! Why couldn't it have been kiddie porn? That would have sold the dumb Americans!"

    - Mike Roger's Internal Monologue

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:44am

      Re:

      I'm sure his team will sprinkle some of that on NK servers to justify getting non-boots-on-the-ground boots on the ground.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Groaker (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:45am

    How does Rogers even know that NK wasn't attacked in return? Does anyone think that NK would admit it, or that the US would brag about it -- it would give NK an excuse to shell, bomb, or invade SK.

    SONY has terrible security, refuses to improve it, and practically invites crackers in.

    Worse, Sony has committed massive numbers of rootkit attacks, on audio CDs played on computers, against Americans and others. If everybody whose computer was damaged by Sony, attacked in return, Sony could give up computers for ever.

    War doesn't work well for the losers or the winners. Talking, no matter how inane, is a far better solution than destruction, maiming and death.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:50am

      Re:

      I'm not sure Rogers knows that North Korea has a substantial amount of artillery in range of major population centers in South Korea. He's never really struck me as the well informed type.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:01am

        Re: Re:

        ...North Korea has a substantial amount of artillery...

        Graphic: North Korea’s Conventional Arms”, by Richard Johnson, Andrew Barr and Jonathon Rivait, National Post, April 10, 2013
        “North Korea's Conventional Forces visualized”

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • icon
          Groaker (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:01am

          Re: Re: Re:

          Without using nuclear weapons, wars are won on the ground. Vietnam was proof of this. As are Iraq, Afghanistan and many parts of Africa.

          North Korea not only has weapons and allies, they have ground based forces trained and disciplined under conditions that 1st world nation forces would not be able to function under.

          South Korea left its capital within artillery range of NK -- possibly one of the stupidest strategic decisions since the invasions of Afghanistan by the USSR and the US.

          A US Vet.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          • identicon
            Socrates, 22 Dec 2014 @ 3:25pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re:

            Without using nuclear weapons, wars are won on the ground. Vietnam was proof of this. As are Iraq, Afghanistan and many parts of Africa.

            True

            But they may be lost because of stupidity. As in supporting the "opposition" in Syria and the "government" in Irak, in a common war zone where the "opposition" is the same.

            North Korea not only has weapons and allies, they have ground based forces trained and disciplined under conditions that 1st world nation forces would not be able to function under.

            And as USA have a history in the region things can turn badly unpredictably. A history with such things as spraying civilian population with napalm and white phosphorus, spraying rice fields with agent Orange, and so on.

            Both the South- and North-Korea does a lot of posturing. The posturing will end if they believe the war has begun. This will be very bad.

            South Korea left its capital within artillery range of NK -- possibly one of the stupidest strategic decisions since the invasions of Afghanistan by the USSR and the US.

            To really point to the significance of this; this was the sole reason for the war between Soviet and Finland during the second world war. Leningrad (/St. Petersburg) is close to the Finnish border.

            Soviet demanded control over sufficient territory to prevent shelling of Leningrad from Finland. Finland refused to cede any land at all and Soviet attacked as it desperately needed a buffer zone. This caused Finland to be allied with Nazi Germany, and Finnish Jews to fight alongside the Nazis.

            The Finnish military never crossed into previous Soviet terretory but the Germans shelled and attacked Leningrad, and when the Germans lost, Soviet chose to not attack Finland again. If Soviet had not tried to prevent Leningrad to be shelled from Finland, it might not have been shelled!

            The war also caused a lot of confusion about whom to consider the enemy in Scandinavia, as Norway were occupied by the Nazi, and Finland attacked by Soviet. People were considered war criminals for fighting on both sides! (Against Soviet in Finland, and with Soviet against the Nazi in Norway).

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          • identicon
            Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 12:49pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re:

            Without using nuclear weapons...
            North Korea's Nukes Are Scarier Than Its Hacks”, by Josh Rogin and Eli Lake, BloombergView, Dec 23, 2014
            While the world’s attention focuses on North Korea’s cyberwar with Sony, the Hermit Kingdom is rapidly increasing its stockpile of nuclear weapons material, with little real pushback from the United States.

            A new analysis of North Korea’s nuclear program by a group of top U.S. experts . . .

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          PRMan, 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:08am

          Re: Re: Re:

          Thanks for that. I never knew that North Korea had so many strollers in their armed forces (J/K).

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:06am

      Re:

      How does Rogers even know that NK wasn't attacked in return? Does anyone think that NK would admit it, or that the US would brag about it
      It would not be the first time that this administration bragged about something when the diplomatically wise choice was to remain silent.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:28am

        Re: Re:

        ...the diplomatically wise choice was to remain silent.

        State Dept. Says North Korea Should Pay Back Sony for Cyberattack”, by Pete Kasperowicz, The Blaze,Dec. 22, 2014
         . . . Weekend reports suggested that North Korea may have lost access to the Internet, which led to questions Monday about whether the U.S. was behind that. [State Dept. spokeswoman Marie] Harf didn’t deny that the U.S. was behind that outage, and said only that the U.S. was in the process of responding to the cyberattack.

        “As we implement our responses, some will be seen, some may not be seen,” she said. . . .

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        Groaker (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 1:21pm

        Re: Re:

        If the US bragged about a cyber attack on NK, NK would have no option but a massive retaliation.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • identicon
          Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 1:42pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          If the US bragged about a cyber attack on NK...
          Wasn't going to bother calling attention to a story that's hit Google News front page, the New York Times, Fox News, and SlashdotNorth Korea Is Experiencing a Full Internet Blackout”, by Dustin Volz, National Journal, Dec 22, 2014
          A White House spokesman declined to comment on the apparent blackout, saying, "We don't have anything additional on North Korea to share today."


          (H/T GovExec)

          Extra tidbit, fwiw: NBC News earlier had a story with some unnamed government official denying that the U.S. had anything to do with the DPRK outage.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Max (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:48am

    Hold on...

    There seems to be a lot of confusion about things coming out of the mouth of a politician - any politician - having anything to do with reason, facts, sane and desirable actions or anything of that sort, as opposed to simply being whatever things said politician thinks "his" people want to hear him say. Unfortunately, not everyone takes them as such.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:09am

    The truth is they don't know who did it and blindly swinging at a few maybe people is more in lines with a drunken bar fight, I don't understand these idiots when everything is an act of war , hell they should be counting their blessings American Citizens don't act and respond the same or all their bribe taking asses would be impaled on the white house lawn.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:09am

    Any bets on who Mike Rogers goes to work for after his term?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Roger Strong (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:20am

    It may not be terrorism, but it's still unusually significant. Sony - from the lack of prosecution for it's rootkit to the demands it made to press outlets last week - demonstrates why. So does Rep. Mike Rogers, every time he opens his mouth:

    Communism was once China's highest ideal, while in the US it was democracy, capitalism and citizens' rights. They've apparently agreed to meet half-way at authoritarian capitalism.

    The attack on Sony is an attack on the emerging political system of both countries.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:36am

    Mike Rogers, you're out of touch and out of office. Good riddance you douche-canoe.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:46am

    'No wonder he's going into AM talk radio. He'll be a perfect fit.'

    i assume everyone else at the station has agreed to take reductions in air time, so Rogers can say what he wants? i mean he wouldn't be able to in just a normal slot, would he!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    william (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 10:51am

    North Koreans don't care your Capitalist Pigs launching your precious "Cyber attacks".

    You cannot attack what doesn't exist, so the joke is on you. hahaha.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Roger Strong (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:06am

      Re:

      You laugh. Just wait until a spy satellite tasked with watching Pyongyang rickrolls the National Reconnaissance Office, after one of the massive parades in Kim Il-sung Square forms a giant QR code.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        william (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 1:44pm

        Re: Re:

        Lol, I like the QR code idea.

        What I meant is, North Korea doesn't really have a "internet" to speak of.

        So you can't launch a cyber attack on a non-existing network.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:05am

    I don't see how CISPA could have stopped Sony employees from putting their passwords in a network shared folder named Passwords. With the password set to 'password'.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    hij (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:08am

    DDoS

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    hij (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:12am

    DDoS'em all and let God Sort Them Out

    This is a great idea. Since the majority of North Korea's Internet goes through China and is supplied by China then they should be quite happy when the US uses equipment in the PRC to get at one of their allies. It is time to go "full cowboy" and start shooting. Surely everything would go wonderfully, and the North Korean cyber people will welcome us with open arms.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:17am

    United Fascists of America are amusing.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    John85851 (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:24am

    An alternative...

    Or maybe there are people sitting around in back rooms:
    "You know guys, since we're pulling troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan, we have all these troops that we're using."
    "And people are getting tired of hearing about ISIS, Putin, and Iran. Is there anyone else we can turn into a bad guy and rally behind?"
    "How about Cuba? They've always been a good fall-back. But now Obama's making friends with them."
    "Has anyone used North Korea recently? Bingo- our new boogeyman, out to destroy our freedoms with their cyberattacks on American companies!"
    "Um, Sony is a Japanese company."
    "Don't bother me with the details! Let's get this war started."

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:27am

    So, was there any real evidence that NK was involved?
    Or was it the same as with the Syrian gas attacks? Remember that they had "credible evidence" that they refused to share then a few months later it turned out to be bullshit.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Socrates, 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:43am

    Rogers, who is retiring from Congress in just a few days, made a final plug for his bill to facilitate cybersecurity information sharing between the private sector and National Security Agency (NSA)


    Because distributing even more information makes it easier to keep secrets?
    Because hiring even more consultants to sift through information for NSA makes it easier to keep secrets?
    Because by sharing any information with the private sector such as Sony, the information would be safe?


    If USA really wanted to harm its opponents it should export Rogers!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Socrates, 22 Dec 2014 @ 1:55pm

      Re:

      Mike Rogers(CISPA):"The bill would allow the government to share all of its classified cyber-security knowledge with private companies,"

      bat shit crazy !


      Mike Rogers(CISPA):"forming knowledge-sharing agreements that would hopefully keep China (and other countries and hackers) out of American computer networks."

      Facepalm

      By sharing all your secrets, all your secrets is shared!

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Rich Kulawiec, 22 Dec 2014 @ 11:53am

    I'm throwing the BS flag on this one

    “I can tell you we have the capability to make this very difficult for them in the future,” he said.

    When you've built an entire economy on the kind of rickety "security" infrastructure that Sony epitomizes, it would be unwise to engage an enemy which hasn't...since you are vastly more vulnerable than they are. Particularly if there's no proof on the table -- and thus far, there is ZERO PROOF -- that they're actually the ones behind it.

    Note: any claim on North Korea's part that they did it still leaves us with zero proof. Any threats on North Korea's part still leave us with zero proof. They claim stuff and make threats six times before breakfast, often involving things everyone knows they didn't do and things they couldn't possibly do.

    If Mike Rogers disagrees, then I, for one, am perfectly happy to see him strike a blow for freedom. Let him be given a uniform, a parachute, and a rifle, and air-dropped into North Korea. Go get 'em, tiger!

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 12:08pm

      Re: I'm throwing the BS flag on this one

      When you've built an entire economy on the kind of rickety "security" infrastructure that Sony epitomizes, it would be unwise to engage an enemy which hasn't...since you are vastly more vulnerable than they are.

      Especially as North Korea has a minimum use of the Internet, and the US has foolishly let large parts of its infrastructure be connected to the Internet.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Blaine (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 12:36pm

    Mike Rogers is an expert on hacks!!!

    Like they say,

    Takes one to know one.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 12:41pm

    DPRK Cyber Capabilities

    North Korea’s Cyber Capabilities: Deterrence and Stability in a Changing Strategic Environment”, by Egle Murauskaite, 38 North, 12 September 2014
    ... While information about the DPRK’s cyber capabilities remains scarce and is based on hard to corroborate defector accounts, it is worth adopting a macro-perspective to analyze the influence of offensive cyber capabilities on North Korea’s broader strategy....


    This article links to an HP Security Briefing, “Profiling an enigma: The mystery of North Korea’s cyber threat landscape”, August 2014

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    spacy (profile), 22 Dec 2014 @ 3:22pm

    Title

    Um. Preemptive instead of premature?

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 7:24pm

    'President Obama should have moved swiftly against North Korea following a cyberattack on Sony Pictures that has cost the company tens of millions of dollars..."

    I'm loosing hope this Congress was going to be better than the last. They are all clueless.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 7:43pm

    If N. Korea were able to pull off such a clever attack that it amounted to 'cyber crime' then the US, as a whole, should feel very embarrassed for sliding down so low on the food chain when it comes to IT skills.

    No one is blaming Sony for having a hand in this with lax security even though they've had problems before.

    That's equal to asking people to not think, not to figure out, not to challenge - which in my mind is more like a "cyber tryanny" which is far more frightening than any "terror attack" that a small poor country could do.

    Somehow people in Congress have got to figure out this "internet-thing".

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 23 Dec 2014 @ 1:21pm

      Re:

      Somehow people in Congress have got to figure out this "internet-thing".
      Top congressional Democrat asks Sony for hack details”, Reuters, Dec 23, 2014
      The top Democrat on the powerful U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has asked Sony Pictures Entertainment to hand over details of what he describes as the "devastating cyberattack" recently suffered by the Hollywood studio.

      In a letter sent to Sony on Tuesday . . .

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 22 Dec 2014 @ 9:43pm

    Attribution

    Key North Korean websites back online after shutdown”, by Foster Klug and Hyung-Jin Kim, Associated Press, Dec 23, 2014
    ... Last year, North Korea suffered similar brief Internet shutdowns of websites at a time of nuclear tensions with the U.S., South Korea and other countries. North Korea blamed Seoul and Washington for the outages....

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Rudyard Holmbast, 27 Dec 2014 @ 5:18pm

    Yeah, Rogers should just be quiet, because it would just be so awful if the United States launched cyber attacks against the most brutal, evil dictatorship on the face of the Earth. Seriously, some of the bullshit that shows up on this website is just laughable.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 28 Dec 2014 @ 1:15pm

    So they supposedly want funds to go to a project, which the lion half is most assuredly going into the ability to access and most assurdly take control off of any electronical capable devices..........thats not a cyberwar project, its a damn extension of the nsa, but worded in such a way as to take advantage of a supposed fobar and redirect the fact that their actual goal is to be the biggers hackers of them all, that kinda of tech nobody should have, its fucking scary thinking about how their gonna implement it and use it, if history repeats itself.....and it always bloody does because overreach seems to be a governments bloody nature

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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