Thanks To Namecheap For Sponsoring Techdirt's Switch To SSL

from the for-a-secure-internet dept

Post sponsored by

As some of you know, Techdirt recently completed the process of protecting all Techdirt traffic with full SSL encryption — something we believe every internet company should do. Part of this process involved seeking a sponsor to help us offset the money and time spent getting everything switched over, and today we're happy to announce that Namecheap has stepped up to that role.

We're very happy to work with Namecheap, as the company has established itself as a defender of user rights and an open and secure internet, sharing many of the same values that we espouse here at Techdirt. They were among the first domain registrars to speak up against SOPA, they contributed heavily to the matching funds in our Beacon campaign to raise money for net neutrality reporting, and they do frequent fundraising for groups like the EFF and Fight For The Future.

As part of our sponsorship deal, you'll notice a message from Namecheap at the top of Techdirt, and see a couple more posts highlighting work the company has done and the services it offers — including SSLs.com, Namecheap's SSL certificate shop. We're grateful to Namecheap for its support, which helps our small team keep turning out quality content while juggling important technical upgrades like this one. We hope our readers will take a moment to support Namecheap in return, and check out its services for your needs when it comes to domain names, hosting and security certificates.

Filed Under: sponsorship, ssl, techdirt
Companies: namecheap


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  1. identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 25 Nov 2014 @ 1:13pm

    Re: Re: Questionable agreement

    That's actually quite flexible. Compare it to the total indemnity clause in most registrars' terms.
    Can you be more specific? I'm not surprised that there are lots of bad agreements, but I don't see what's "flexible" about this or how it's not "total" (because it says "reasonably" anticipated?). The Free Software Foundation, by comparison, has an imdemnity clause for people who assign copyrights to them, but it specifically says frivolous lawsuits don't trigger it.

    I think they could do better, anyway, if they really want to be seen as defending rights (there is an entire industry build around providing indemnity coverage to people...); even without such a clause, I'm sure they could sue users to recover amounts they're actually at fault for. Just because all companies are awful doesn't mean they shouldn't try.

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