City Of London Police Arrest Creator Of Anti-Censorship Proxy Service Based On Hollywood's Say So

from the out-of-control dept

We've been covering the extreme and misinformed attempts by the City of London Police to become Hollywood's personal police force online (despite only having jurisdiction for the one square mile known as the City of London). As we've noted, the City of London Police don't seem to understand internet technology at all, nor do they have any jurisdiction to pull down websites. Yet, despite the total lack of a court order, many clueless registrars see letterhead from a police department and assume everything must be legit, even though this completely violates ICANN policy for domain registrars. Much of this is done in "partnership" with legacy players from the industry, who the police seem to listen to without any skepticism at all. It would be like the NYPD giving control of banking fraud investigations to Goldman Sachs.

As we were just pointing out, while the City of London Police seem to think it's "obvious" what is and what is not a "pirate site", oftentimes it's not at all easy to figure that out. That was made clear last week when the organization helping the City of London Police reposted an entire BBC article about their cooperation (soon after our post went up, that company's post disappeared quietly with no notice). And now, TorrentFreak is reporting the City of London Police have "seized" an open proxy service called Immunicity, that was set up as an anti-censorship tool. Not only that, but they've also arrested the operator. The site itself is engaged in no copyright infringement at all. But its entire website has been replaced thanks to a bogus claim by the City of London Police.

The police even seem to brag that they're in the bag for the legacy entertainment companies:
According to Chief Inspector Andy Fyfe, the arrest is a prime example of a successful partnership between the copyright industry and local law enforcement.

“This week’s operation highlights how PIPCU, working in partnership with the creative and advertising industries is targeting every aspect of how copyrighting material is illegally being made available to internet users,” Fyfe says.
So, yes, it's the police "partnering" with a legacy industry that has a long and demonstrated history of bogus attacks on new technologies that challenge its business model. And rather than actually view such claims with skepticism, the police lap it up and take down websites without anything even approaching a court order.

And to show just how confused they are, the main "industry" representative helping the police here basically admits to the belief that any proxy service must be illegal, because the industry doesn't like it:
Commenting on the arrest, FACT Director Kieron Sharp argues that these proxy sites and services are just as illegal as the blocked sites themselves.

“Internet users have sought ways to continue to access the sites by getting round the blocking put in place by the ISPs. One of the ways to do this is to use proxy servers. This operation is a major step in tackling those providing such services,” Sharp notes.
Of course, based on that reasoning, the very same VPNs that many of us use to protect our internet surfing from surveillance would be equally considered "illegal." Basically anything that challenges the business model of these legacy companies must be illegal and the City of London Police seem to think they can arrest those associated with them. Talk about going way overboard and creating massive chilling effects...

Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    Gwiz (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:05am

    According to Chief Inspector Andy Fyfe....

    A distant relative of Barney Fife?

     

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  2.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:12am

    proxys and VPNs are legal in the UK so he should not of been arrested in the first place!

     

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  3.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:13am

    It's basically a social engineering attack. The CLP have no jurisdiction outside their corrupt little fiefdom, let alone any power to declare something illegal (only the courts can do that) but rely on the word "police" on their letters scaring people into compliance.

     

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  4.  
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    beech, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:19am

    How did they arrest the guy? Did he just happen to live in their one square mile of jurisdiction? Or did they leave their jurisdiction to go get him? Or lure him into their jurisdiction?

     

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  5.  
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    Almost Anonymous, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:19am

    Have they ever heard of commerce?

    Better stay out of London when you're on business. Most companies request or even require its people to use a corporate VPN to access their internal resources. And I bet a VPN connection will look very much like a proxy connection to London's best and brightest.

     

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  6.  
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    Baron von Robber, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:20am

    City Of London Police

    Small enough to act quickly, not too big to bribe.

     

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  7.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:24am

    Re: Have they ever heard of commerce?

    They're a fiscal section of the city's police force and corrupt as hell. I would be surprised if they weren't engaged in insider trading.

     

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  8.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:25am

    Re:

    They were taking backhanders from the Church of Scientology a few years back. Which tells you all you need to know, really.

     

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  9.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:28am

    What makes a complete mockery and joke of these site blocks and show just how completely stupid and useless they are by the likes of the BPI etc. in the UK is that only 6 ISP's in the UK are subject to block these sites by being subject to the court order. Wheras ALL the other ISP's in the UK are not subject to the court order blocking sites and do NOT block these sites at all.

    If accessing these sites were illegal then blocking access to these sites should be implented by every ISP in the UK and not just by a few them. It cannot be illegal to access these sites if there are still ISP's in the UK that does not block access to them and so accessing these sites cannot therefor be illegal.

    Only a stupid fool would block access to the front of a building in stopping people from gaining access to the building but leaves the side and back entrances of that building free to still allow people to access the building.

     

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  10.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:31am

    Re:

    "Wheras ALL the other ISP's in the UK are not subject to the court order blocking sites and do NOT block these sites at all."

    In particular, the court orders aren't binding on anyone other than the ISPs in question. Including VPN and proxy operators and end users. You're not breaching the order by accessing a blocked site, nor is any VPN or proxy you're using to do so.

     

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  11.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:32am

    i hope the person concerned with Immunicity, fights whatever hw is going to be charged with. i read where he has handed the domain over. i dont know if that is true or not. i hope it isn't because neither FACT or the City of London Police have the right to take that domain or demand that it is handed over. as far as i am aware, having and operating proxies in the UK is NOT illegal! i am waiting to read what the charges are against this person and hope he takes the accusers to court! the problem, which is one the police and the copyright industries and their henchmen are fully aware is the lack of finance to mount any defense!!

     

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  12.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:32am

    he was released on bail and not charge with anything it unlikely he will be charge cause he has done noting illegal

     

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  13.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:34am

    How do they arrest anybody or seize anything outside of their 1 square mile jurisdiction?

     

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  14.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:38am

    I recommend signage on everyone's doors NO City of London Police Allowed. by order of people smarter than you. quick question what are the laws regarding making video's of these guys in public or your home or business?

     

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  15.  
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    MadAsASnake (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:40am

    Re:

    Unlikely he will be charged. What could they charge him with?

     

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  16.  
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    MadAsASnake (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:41am

    Re:

    No hawkers
    No circulars
    Ni PIPCU
    ?

     

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  17.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:43am

    Re: Re:

    no Idea

     

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  18.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:43am

    Re:

    According to a report in The Register, they went 200 km outside their jurisdiction to do this:
    City of London cops have ventured outside the M25 to cuff a suspect in Nottingham under the suspicion that he runs a "proxy server" which allows users to access 36 verboten sites.

     

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  19.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:44am

    Re: Re:

    And when the charges are dropped will he get his websites and domains back. The MAFIAA will say being as he voluntarily handed them over.

    He should sue them back to get his property, websites and domains back.

     

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  20.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:51am

    Re: Re:

    It's a rather misleading first line because it suggests that the CLP's jurisdiction covers all of Greater London rather than just the City (the Met might have a few words to say about that...) but yes, they were a bit far from home.

     

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  21.  
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    Digger, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:56am

    Yo - City of London Police - Wake the fuck up

    You're criminals now - yes, that's right, you, the police are criminals stealing perfectly legal websites and equipment.

    The copyright industry is one of the biggest bunch of U.S. Rico act violators in the world - they purposely lie to law enforcement around the globe. They publish known false data to support their lies - ie they lie to cover their lies which were lied about to cover other lies.

    You yahoos are ignorant fucks that couldn't think your way out of a wet and decayed paper bag for falling for their outright lies and greed.

    So - good job becoming the criminals here - hope you enjoy being Bobby's butt buddy in prison when you're all arrested and thrown in jail.

     

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  22.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 9:04am

    Re:

    Admittedly I know nothing about London's legal system, but how do they charge bail without charging him for a crime? In the US, bail rates are set based on the type and severity of the alleged crime.

     

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  23.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 9:06am

    Re:

    All right, so the question that begs itself is:

    Who polices the police?

    If these frauds think they are above the law, where do we report them? What can we do to stop this little gang of criminals?

     

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  24.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 9:08am

    Seems like police are turning into corporate attack dogs rather then public servants.

     

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  25.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 9:15am

    Re: Re:

    well in the UK you can be bailed without charge if they still think there a crime if bailed you are waiting to see if you are going to be charge or alleged is drop. it in case its unlikely he will be charge because what he is doing is legal

     

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  26.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 9:19am

    Re: Re:

    In theory, at least, the police who actually have jurisdiction can make life very difficult for any CLP who muscle in on their territory. And I wouldn't even be surprised to see it happen one day: no police force likes outsiders trying to do their job for them.

     

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  27.  
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    quayph, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 9:51am

    Re: Re:

    how do they charge bail without charging him for a crime? In the US, bail rates are set based on the type and severity of the alleged crime.

    In the UK you don't pay any money to get bail, either you're considered safe and it's granted - you can leave, or you're thought to be dangerous / a flight risk - it's not granted and you stay in the cells.

     

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  28.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 9:56am

    Re: outside of their 1 square mile

    They get an arrest warrant and request the police force local to the suspect(s) to enforce it.

     

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  29.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:01am

    Re: Re:

    Unless the judge deems him a danger he can be released while the Crown Prosecution Service decides to press charges. Depending on their workload, the seriousness of the alleged offence, the colour of the moonbeams today etc that may be a short time or a long time. Where short and long are about the same length as pirces of string. If they decide to charge him he will be requested to show up at a police station to be charged or he can do a runner and another warrant will be issued to bring him in. When he's charged he can appear to request bail and it may or may not be granted.

     

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  30.  
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    Alto, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:06am

    "According to Chief Inspector Andy Fyfe, the arrest is a prime example of a successful partnership between the copyright industry and local law enforcement. "

    Wait! The "copyright Industry"? is that even a thing?

     

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  31.  
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    Whatever (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:21am

    Re: Re:

    However, there is potential that aiding people who use those ISPs to get around the block may be a problem. Doing so intentionally and with knowledge of those blocks may be the issue here.

    What I think the bigger issue here is how the internet will be policed in the long run. The internet cannot be left as a lawless alternate universe, that would essentially destroy public order over time.

     

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  32.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:32am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "The internet cannot be left as a lawless alternate universe, that would essentially destroy public order over time."

    Spoken like a true authoritarian.

     

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  33.  
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    Tim A, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:33am

    I wonder if any money is changing hands...

     

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  34.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:35am

    Re:

    It's the CLP. I'd be more surprised if it wasn't.

     

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  35.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:40am

    All VPN sevices have to do if this becomes a problem is cancel servers in UK datacenters and no longer have servers in Britain.

    It would mean no longer having access, outside Britain to things like iPlayer, or online streams of British radio stations, but it will also shield them from prosecution in Britan.

    A website owner outside Britain that has no servers in Britan, and no sssetts in Britain is NOT SUBJECT to Britiah law.

    There is one VPN company run by a Chinese citizen living in China. That means he would be ONLY subject to CHINESE laws and IS NOT SUBJECT to arrest or prosecution in Britain, if he were to remove all his servers from datacenters he currently has in the UK.

     

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  36.  
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    DogBreath, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:40am

    Re: Re:

    Don't forget to include:

    No Spiders or Visgoths Allowed.

     

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  37.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:41am

    Re: Re: Re:

    " aiding people who use those ISPs to get around the block may be a problem. "

    Why?

    BT is my ISP so direct access to TPB is "blocked". However under UK law TPB is considered perfectly so no crime is being committed in me accessing it. Neither is a crime being committed by helping me to access it.

    So the only issue exists in why the media cartels have been allowed to get these sites "blocked" in the first place.

    (I keep using "" around blocked because the blocks are completely futile when used against a half competent torrent user)

     

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  38.  
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    John Fenderson (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:45am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "The internet cannot be left as a lawless alternate universe"

    No problem, then, because it's not a lawless alternate universe in the first place.

     

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  39.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 10:52am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    ** perfectly legal

     

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  40.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:01am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Indeed. If it was, there'd be no guarantee that (for instance) a given URL pointed to the right file on the right server. The internet regulates itself quite nicely, and the last thing we need is any kind of "regulation" dreamed up by suits who need a step-by-step guide to log into Facebook.

     

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  41.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:05am

    Re: Re: outside of their 1 square mile

    Indeed, that's one way that the local forces could make the CLP's lives more difficult, if they made sure any such warrants got "lost in the system". It seems in this case that they went up to Nottingham in person, though.

     

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  42.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:17am

    city of london police eh?
    maybe a name change is coming up, republic of hollywood police.
    does that make them a breakaway group, and therefore terrorists then?

     

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  43.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:19am

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    It completely bugs me as to why ONLY some ISP's here in the UK block access to these *illegal* sites when the other ISP's don't block access to the same sites.

    If these sites were *illegal* then access to these sites should/would have applied for all the ISP's in the UK to block access them.

    By blocking access to some sites by some ISP's and allowing other ISP's to continue to allow access to the same sites is nothing but censorship and discrimanation in my book and that accessing these sites is NOT illegal whilst there are ISP's that continue to allow access to these sites.

     

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  44.  
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    Jon Jones (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:29am

    "the City of London Police ..... (despite only having jurisdiction for the one square mile known as the City of London)"

    It doesn't work like that in the UK. All UK police officers have full jurisdiction and legal powers in the whole of the UK. UK police forces are not just responsible for a certain area. Just because a force is based in one area doesn't mean anything changes when elsewhere in the UK.

     

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  45.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:30am

    Re:

    I semi-joked over on TF that we could prosecute them for sedition, if they're found to be putting the interests of foreign corporations ahead of the people they're (at least on paper) meant to be serving.

     

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  46.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:43am

    Re:

    True, but they are at least in theory answerable to the local force when playing away from home. Local forces who aren't always especially sympathetic to folk from London coming up here and throwing their weight around.

     

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  47.  
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    Whatever (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 12:23pm

    Re:

    A website owner outside Britain that has no servers in Britan, and no sssetts in Britain is NOT SUBJECT to Britiah law.

    That is not entirely true or established. If the company is actively offering service in the UK, and soliciting business in the UK, then they could very well be subject to UK law. It might be mind numbing hard to extradite someone, but moves to make the business unprofitable or unavailable in the UK could be taken.

    Being offshore is no clear protection if you offer services in a country.

     

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  48.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 12:58pm

    Censoring an Anti-Censorship Proxy?

    So the UK finally joins the ranks of China and North Korea.

    Congratulations.

     

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  49.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 1:22pm

    Re: Re: outside of their 1 square mile

    So criticism needs to be placed on the local police force as well for recognizing the bogus warrant's validity.

     

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  50.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 1:29pm

    Re: Re:

    In that case the UK has three choices two legal and one not.

    1. Request cooperation from the sovereign nation where the individual is located and hope that it is granted. (legal)

    2. Try to capture the individual by force violating the nations sovereignty. (illegal)

    3. Bitch about it. (legal)

     

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  51.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 1:49pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Option 3, of course, just drives more people to use it. Case in point: TPB.

     

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  52. This comment has been flagged by the community. Click here to show it
     
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 2:04pm

    Mike Masnick just hates it when copyright law is enforced

     

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  53.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 2:14pm

    Re:

    And rightly so.

     

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  54.  
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    Violated (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 2:14pm

    Re: Re:

    As he was arrested then so was he bailed while they continue their investigation maybe leading to a [doubtful] trial.

    The interesting part is what he was arrested for when to be a lawful arrest they have to believe he has committed a crime. We don't know the full details of course but from what we can publicly see he did nothing unlawful.

     

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  55.  
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    BernardoVerda (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 2:33pm

    Re: Re:

    > They were taking backhanders from the Church of Scientology a few years back. Which tells you all you need to know, really.

    I found that a little hard to believe, so I fired up the old search engine... Oh dear! Not Cricket!

     

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  56.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 3:05pm

    Re: Censoring an Anti-Censorship Proxy?

    no we have not!

     

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  57.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 4:27pm

    Re: Re:

    Is that legal in the UK?

     

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  58.  
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    observer, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 4:45pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    I know what you mean. It didn't get anywhere near the attention it should have, perhaps because the CLP weren't flexing their muscles at the rest of the country back then. It deserves to be wheeled out every time they're in the news. Anyone tries to tell you that they value morality or the rule of law over money, well, there's your proof that they don't.

     

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  59.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 4:48pm

    Re: Re:

    if the services are LEGAL in the country you are operating from, that is all that matters. You are ONLY subject to the laws of whatever country you are operating from.

     

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  60.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 5:39pm

    Re:

    This is the wrong thread; your boyfriend Whatever is several posts up.

     

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  61.  
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    Anonymous, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 6:59pm

    Re: Barney Fife

    At least Barney wasn't as gullible or naive.

     

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  62.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 7:42pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    IANAL, bu AIUI police jurisdiction is based on the location of the principal crime not the location of the perpetrator. Usually local police will arrest a suspect for whom a warrant or APB has been issued, and will supply the necessary wooden-tops, armed response, etc., but any constable can arrest anywhere for a crime within his jurisdiction. A constable out of his jurisdiction has no power to go looking for trouble beyond that of an ordinary citizen, apart from specially limited circumstances.

     

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  63.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 7:48pm

    Re: Re:

    Operating an ISP without proper paperwork, or failing to comply with the data retention law, possibly.

    Failing that, there's always the usual charges under the Ways and Means Act.

     

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  64.  
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    That One Guy (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 7:55pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    When people make that claim about the internet, their issue isn't that the internet 'has no laws'(it does, based upon the location of the servers/service in question), it's that it doesn't follow the 'laws' that they want it to, like 'forced secondary/tertiary liability' and 'every company on the planet, except the ones who's responsibility it actually is, need to become copyright cops.'

     

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  65.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 7:56pm

    Re: Re: Re: outside of their 1 square mile

    There isn't a lot of choice - the Home Office can cut off their funding to the various police forces (other than the BTP, MOD Police, etc., who are funded by other departments) and sack the police commissioners, requiring the counties to fund the police entirely themselves (which they can't afford, especially since they have very limited ability to raise revenue) and find suitable commissioners which the Home Office will accept.

     

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  66.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:01pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    Unless your country's politicians exercise their usual regard for the good of their country and ratify a hopelessly one-sided extradition treaty which doesn't require dual criminality and recognises insane claims of universal jurisdiction.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  67.  
    icon
    BernardoVerda (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 8:32pm

    Re: Re: Re:

    upon reflection, my comment is open to misinterpretation. My point was that the LCP does indeed appear to have a history of accepting "benefits" and to have shown clear bias in favour of the Ch. of Scientology.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  68.  
    icon
    That One Guy (profile), Aug 7th, 2014 @ 11:56pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    Pretty much any stance regarding that particular cult more favorable than 'Keep them as far away from me/us as humanly possible', is cause for concern I'd say, whether you're talking about a person or an organization.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  69.  
    icon
    PaulT (profile), Aug 8th, 2014 @ 12:16am

    Re: Re: Re:

    "However, there is potential that aiding people who use those ISPs to get around the block may be a problem.

    Why? Come on, stop stating your half-considered opinions as if they were facts and start explaining yourself.

    "What I think the bigger issue here is how the internet will be policed in the long run."

    OK, then who do you think should be in charge. Do you support a small police force under the direction of a group of foreign corporations doing that policing in areas outside of their jurisdiction, or do you have enough of a shred of honesty left to admit that this is a problem?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  70.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Aug 8th, 2014 @ 12:21am

    Re:

    Mike Masnick just hates it when copyright law is abused.

    FTFY

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  71.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Aug 8th, 2014 @ 12:30am

    Re:

    AC just loves it when terrorists and fascists hide behind copyright.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  72.  
    icon
    Ninja (profile), Aug 8th, 2014 @ 5:55am

    Re: Re: Re:

    The tyrant inside you is very active lately eh?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  73.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Aug 8th, 2014 @ 6:42am

    Re: Re: Censoring an Anti-Censorship Proxy?

    You can deny it as much as you want, but it won't stop being true.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  74.  
    icon
    Jon Jones (profile), Aug 8th, 2014 @ 9:11am

    Re:

    Could you exactly explain how this young man has broken any copyright laws?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  75.  
    icon
    GEMont (profile), Aug 8th, 2014 @ 12:31pm

    Progress is a relative concept

    Amazing how well this test project is working out for the crooks, in their relentless effort to turn the internet into their own advertising tool and stop its use as a public communications system.

    So far, they've been able to do whatever they want and not one action has been challenged legally.

    That's pretty damn impressive PR graft work.

    Pretty soon they'll have a bag of precedent procedures they can export to the US and elsewhere, for inclusion in laws that will end forever the horror of the Free Internet.

    Another success story for the forces of Fascism!

    There is no escaping the Grand Aquisition!!

    ---

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  76.  
    identicon
    The Prox Is Right, Aug 8th, 2014 @ 5:10pm

    Seeking alternative proxy aggregator?

    While this site is on holiday, if you are seeking a substitute free proxy aggregator, I invite you to check out https://TheProxIsRight.com for “Pain-free access to open, presently active proxies, from around the net. We aggregate and test, so you don’t have to.”

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  77.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Aug 8th, 2014 @ 5:17pm

    Re: Progress is a relative concept

    "So far, they've been able to do whatever they want and not one action has been challenged legally"

    how wrong you are

    http://torrentfreak.com/domain-registrars-deny-police-requests-suspend-pirate-sites-140808/

    so no this is not working but its a good PR stunt tho

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  78.  
    icon
    KevinEHayden (profile), Aug 8th, 2014 @ 7:27pm

    Re:

    Probably not so much a distant relative as the love child of Sherrif Andy and Barney Fyfe. Or maybe Barney's younger, dumber brother.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  79.  
    icon
    GEMont (profile), Aug 9th, 2014 @ 12:06pm

    Re: Re: Progress is a relative concept

    By "challenged legally" I was referring to the government and the courts challenging the legal right of the City Of London Police to do whatever they desired, rather than their victims challenging the CoLPolice's apparently unauthorized actions.

    I would assume that most the victims of these quasi-legal actions by CoLPolice would disagree with the actions do whatever they could to circumvent the restrictions being applied.

    In the cases where victims have brought these actions by the CoLPolice to the courts' attention, have the courts generally sided with the victims or with the CoLPolice?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  80.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Aug 10th, 2014 @ 12:10am

    Re: Re:

    ...sounds of crickets...

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  81.  
    icon
    wallyb132 (profile), Aug 10th, 2014 @ 1:46pm

    City streets

    Why isnt the city of london police seizing the city streets, drug dealers and other criminals are using the city streets to commit their crimes, so why arent they seizing them as well?

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  82.  
    icon
    GEMont (profile), Aug 13th, 2014 @ 2:51pm

    Re: City streets

    "Why isnt the city of london police seizing the city streets..."

    Well, that's still illegal...

    Besides, Hollywood isn't paying the City of London Police to clean up the streets of London, prevent crime, or arrest criminals.

    Its only paying the CoL low-cost rental pigs to destroy as many of the web-sites Hollywood dislikes, as fast as possible, before legislation makes such activities illegal again.

    I suppose if some other organized crime... er... organization was to offer the easily-purchased LEOs of the City Of London Police Force, money under the table to arrest druggies off the streets of London, that they probably would do so... in their spare time.

    But it would have to be a big graft offer like the one that Hollywood is giving them currently, or better. Gotta think about retirement and all that you know.
    ---

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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