Japanese Anime And Manga Fans Worried About How TPP Will Kill Important Fan Fiction

from the don't-mess-with-dojinshi dept

Over a decade ago, we first wrote about how manga and anime in Japan was thriving in part due to the rise of fan fiction (even for-profit fan fiction) and the fact that the lawyers for official publications didn't try to shut it down. Instead, they realized that such fan fiction was often quite good for the original, official versions of the products. Over the years since then, we've had a bunch of similar stories. Rather than trying to hit fans with copyright infringement claims, publishers were willing to embrace those fans and it helped everyone in the industry.

However, many in the fan fiction -- dojinshi -- market in Japan are now worried that the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement may now kill off that happy, mutually beneficial (even if technically infringing) setup. At issue is that the TPP may require more stringent enforcement of copyrights, even when the copyright holder has no problem with what's happening.
Usami and other creators of fan fiction, however, could face the possibility of legal prosecution as copyright violators in the future, depending on the outcome of TPP negotiations.

Some countries are apparently demanding that Japan clamp down on knock-off and pirated works in the intellectual property arena, even if the copyright holder does not object to it.
The more cynical among you might point to the fact that the dojinshi market's proof that copyright maximalism can be counterproductive, and allowing free flowing "infringement" among fans creating derivative works, so bothers some people that they feel the need to kill off such an important counter-example to the maximalist narrative. However, those involved in the space in Japan recognize that not enforcing copyright law has been better for everyone:
Many experts say the Japanese anime and manga subculture has thrived due in part to a tacit understanding in society that fan fiction should be accepted to a certain extent to allow room for amateurs to shine.

The recent Comic Market is one indication of the level of demand for dojinshi and other works of fan fiction. A total of 520,000 visitors attended--many of them teenagers or in their 20s--while about 35,000 groups sold dojinshi and other related goods.
Some are even worried that it might extend to cracking down on cosplay:
“The creation of derivative works has helped the expansion of the market (for anime and manga), a rich gray zone built based on a gentleman’s agreement between original artists and amateur creators,” [lawyer Kansaku Fukui] said.

If the copyright law was enforced without a formal complaint, not only dojinshi, but also parodied creations of movies and literature, could be subject to a crackdown, Fukui said.

He added that even cosplayers could be a target, especially if their costumes were elaborately made and if a video of the costume play was uploaded on the Internet.

“If people think about the possibility of coming under questioning, they might cower,” he said.
I would imagine that the various negotiators of the TPP probably aren't all that familiar with anime, manga or cosplay -- but pissing off fans of all three probably isn't particularly wise.

Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    silverscarcat (profile), Apr 2nd, 2014 @ 6:37pm

    Ah, nuts!

    If this passes, there goes Comiket!

    How else am I supposed to get the awesome fan-made stuff from Japan?

    But, seriously, this would make fanfiction illegal, huh?

    ...This sucks.

     

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  2.  
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    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 1:10am

    Laws are for people, not the way around

    mutually beneficial (even if technically infringing) setup

    Isn't this the prime indicator of an outdated/unnecessary law?
    Every side of the setup ignores the law, because it's hampering them. Then why the F*** are we having this law in the first place?
    Laws are not born to exist out of context from some god-emperor's mind (or, at least it shouldn't), they should reflect and formalize the accepted behavioral rules of our society. If accepted behavior changes, the laws must(should) follow suite.

     

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  3.  
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    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 1:13am

    Re: Ah, nuts!

    Yes, because fan fiction is technically infringement. Which is ridiculous, but according to Hollywood, it's necessary for teh artists!

    And TPP fucks up every mutually agreed law ignoring by bringing a third party to the setup in the form of the government. Who isn't interested in either groups interests.

     

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  4.  
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    Mega1987 (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 1:48am

    Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    the politician's thinking nowadays are those of the medieval era... where their words ARE LAW.

    And the people MUST abide them by the letter....

    there's no gray part on their judgement.... just white and black....


    And these guys will be making nearly everyone extremely pissed off that tall the fans WILL further dive into piracy to get the good stuff that the additional red tapes will block to squeeze more money out of it...

     

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  5.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 1:52am

    Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Not necessarily. The same copyright laws prevent someone from making an anime or spin off manga without permission. For example, a One Piece spin off would probably sell quite well. The copyright laws in effect prevent someone from cashing in like that, making them still useful.

    Not using the law to crack down on amateurs releasing the odd infringing work a few times a year like they were a commercial scale infringer is just being sane in the exercise of the law.

     

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  6.  
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    PaulT (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 1:57am

    Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    "Then why the F*** are we having this law in the first place?"

    Because the law isn't written for those people nor for consumers. It's written for those corporations that refuse to adapt and wish to have the world conform to their ideals, not change themselves to adapt to new marketplace realities.

     

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  7.  
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    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:05am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    I disagree. Selective enforcement of a law is never a good thing. In this case, it's a workaround of a flaw.

     

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  8.  
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    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:06am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    It was a rhetorical question :]

     

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    Gerald, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:06am

    If the makers of the content are not reporting on possible copyright infringement who will? Is the government going to start reading every manga and going to every comicon? I don't understand how this would work.

     

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  10.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:29am

    check out, people, who is going to benefit most from TPP, TTIP and any other 'partnership'. check how close each one of these 'partnerships' is getting a certain industry to it's goal of being able to control the use of the Internet for it's own needs. if there isn't some serious obstacles put up, the 'net' wont be worth a thing to the people or be able to be used in it's intended ways

     

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  11.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:34am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Do you really want to see a world where the big publishers, labels and studios control all the art that you can access. That is where the maximalist approach too copyright is headed, nothing to be published without their blessing, and without them making almost all the profit.

     

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  12.  
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    Jay (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:37am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    One Piece is a derivative work in itself.

    The work for the show and the research required equates to a TON of work to create newer versions of people we know from history.

    For example, Whitebeard and Blackbeard are actually from the mythos of Blackbeard the pirate.

    Roronoa Zoro is a readaptation of the masked man that went on to help Batman be created.

    And literally looking through the entire history of One Piece is looking through the entire history of the actual age of piracy.

    And it's not just Eiichiro Oda's work that does this.

    Rurouni Kenshin is a retelling of history of the early Meiji period.

    Think about if copyright worked for only 20 years and people could readapt Batman for newer purposes...

    You'd have a reinvigorated fan market that worked to create better stories outside of WB. But that can't happen so long as copyright is held in the hands of publishers who want to have control over markets until they're gone.

     

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  13.  
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    MadAsASnake (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:40am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    What on earth is "useful" about preventing someone making a commercially viable spin off? Isn't this counter to the entire purpose of copyright?

     

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  14.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 3:16am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Then the law isn't working. Laws are supposed to be applied equally, otherwise they're not laws, more like guidelines with governmental backing.

     

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  15.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 3:17am

    Re:

    Handwavium. Lots and lots of handwavium.

     

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  16.  
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    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 3:37am

    Re: Re:

    You may be joking, but look at how the x strikes systems work. The joke is on you (us).

     

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  17.  
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    arkiel (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 5:07am

    Re: Ah, nuts!

    Everything at comiket is basically infringement.

    Fan-fiction is presumed to be derivative work, which means you could be dragged into court and have to justify fair use. Visual fan-work probably has a heavier burden to meet than written fan-work, but even then it's hard to see how most of it wouldn't satisfy the fair use factors. No negative impacts on market (except maybe direct novelizations), etc.

     

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  18.  
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    My Name Here, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 5:20am

    illegal already

    What is missing in this story is that fan fiction is already a violation of copyright, but the copyright holder tolerates it and always retains the right to tolerate it.

    Attempting to enforce copyright when the rights holder is supporting the infringing party won't work out very well, so all of this reads mostly like a scare tactic to try to get the manga / anime types upset. Their legal position doesn't really change, does it?

     

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  19.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 5:31am

    Fan fiction is legal in the U.S. when it's a parody.

    That said, anime culture has been one of the few things that has let Internet culture thrive. This is a depressing development.

    Will the pain stop for us when Sumner Redstone finally dies of old age? Or is there another power player in the copyright maximalist area that is as horrible to the entire Internet as Sumner has been?

     

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  20.  
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    Lurker Keith, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 5:44am

    It's insane to take on Akihabara!

    May the wrath of Akihabara kill the TPP!

    Also of special note, manga & anime superstars CLAMP started as Dojinshi artists (& MANY others you're less likely to have heard of).

     

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  21.  
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    Radiosity, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:02am

    >> "even for-profit fan fiction"

    Actually, unless you're a really popular artist like Nishimata Aoi you're unlikely to make any profit at all, quite the reverse in fact. Generally it's done out of sheer love of the original work and the culture of sharing what you love.

    In general, the costs of producing a doujin are higher than what little you'll make back selling it at Comiket. As such, profit never really enters into the equation since you're more likely to make a loss on your work anyway.

     

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  22.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:02am

    Re: illegal already

    However, many in the fan fiction -- dojinshi -- market in Japan are now worried that the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement may now kill off that happy, mutually beneficial (even if technically infringing) setup. At issue is that the TPP may require more stringent enforcement of copyrights, even when the copyright holder has no problem with what's happening.

    Read the quote above from the article, it states that the work is technically infringing, and also that pressure will be applied to the copyright holders to take action against the fans. The maximalists do not like any exceptions, legal or not, and publishers ignoring infringement via derivative works undermines their position.

     

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  23.  
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    arkiel (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:05am

    Re: illegal already

    Seems like there'd be constitutional issues with that. Due process issues revolving around the government's seizure of private rights.

    The notion that private companies would have to bring copyright infringement claims is absurd. And impossible. It isn't like the DOJ has the time to review where companies have been studiously monitoring for infringement.

    Worst case scenario, the TPP passes and content creators create a new derivative work licensing scheme philosophically parallel to Creative Commons, but replicating the status quo, except people wouldn't have to worry about bring dragged into court to justify fair-use.

     

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  24.  
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    Lorpius Prime (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:11am

    Where are the quotes in this story coming from?

    This looks like it's based on an article from somewhere, but there doesn't seem to be any link or mention of the source.

     

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  25.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:22am

    I would imagine that the various negotiators of the TPP probably aren't all that familiar with anime, manga or cosplay -- but pissing off fans of all three probably isn't particularly wise.

    And why is that?

     

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  26.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:23am

    Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    No, I want a world where people don't make strawmen to attack me instead of responding to and debating my actual point.

     

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  27.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:35am

    Re: Where are the quotes in this story coming from?

     

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  28.  
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    Vel the Enigmatic, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:39am

    Re:

    Use your head a little and think about it.

     

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  29.  
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    silverscarcat (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 7:19am

    Re:

    Anime, manga and cosplay is gi-fucking-gantic in Japan.

    It would be the same as if copyright prevented anyone from enjoying soccer in Europe or Brazil.

     

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  30.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 7:39am

    Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    This is not so much selective enforcement of a law, as it is selective exercise of the author's rights.

    The big concern which Mike's article fails to convey is that under current copyright law in Japan, the owner of a work has to make a formal complaint before any prosecution for a violation of their copyright can take place.

    In short, the authors have to opt to exercise their rights for anything to happen. That they routinely do not exercise their rights for a subset of conditions is a poor argument for the wholesale removal of those rights.

    The key words there being "wholesale removal". You can make a pretty good argument that this behavior is grounds for narrowing the scope of copyright by adding exceptions for the things the authors are routinely overlooking.

    That's not what Anonymous Howard is suggestion. He's suggesting that the authors not exercising their rights in this one subset of circumstances justifies wholesale abolishment of all of the author's rights.

     

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  31.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 7:57am

    Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Again, this is not the law being applied unequally. The law grants the authors certain rights, as well as discretion in exercising those rights. The authors simply opt to not exercise their rights when it comes to doujin. This is no different from the way that most authors don't exercise their rights when it comes to fan fiction.

    That they see no harm in unprofitable fan works, and thus don't crack down on the fans like they are technically allowed to do; does not justify removal of all of their rights that do exercise.

    Or to put it another way, that the authors routinely grant a defacto free license for non-commercial use does not justify removing their ability to require a paid license for commercial use.

     

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  32.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 8:18am

    Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    The keywords are "without permission". Making a spin off without permission is no different from commercially publishing fanfiction. Or from Marvel publishing it's own Superman stories for that matter.

    You can end up with numerous problems as to quality and consistency, while simultaneously diluting or destroying the original creator's ability to authorize spin offs, or do side stories himself.

    Likewise, enabling any company that chooses to to create an anime adaption of a work to do so without permission removes the author's ability to profit from the adaption in any way but the most indirect means. A poor anime adaption could actually destroy their chances at increasing interest in their series as well. They run the risk of that anyways, but as it stands they at least have some control over the process. Control which Anonymous Howard proposes removing because the authors don't crack down on fans being fans.

     

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  33.  
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    Josh Taylor, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 8:19am

    I don't think TPP will be completed because Japan wants to protect its' agricultural products but all TPP countries want Japan's agricultural products open, eliminating all tariffs. And don't forget, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has vowed to block a "fast-track" bill. But even if Obama doesn't get "fast-track", the TPP can still go into force by ratification of two member countries.

    DeviantArt will be taking down the "fan art" category soon.

     

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  34.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 8:36am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    and what exactly would be wrong in that?

    and don't even think about arguing that it is illegal, illegal does not equate wrong in many cases.

     

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  35.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 8:37am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    to argue your "point" you would have to have one to begin with.

     

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  36.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 8:38am

    Re: illegal already

    It does change the legal position of the manga/anime types. Instead of dealing with flexible and forgiving creators, they'd be dealing with unflexible and unforgiving bureaucracy with no involvement on the part of the original creator required.

    Furthermore, while I'm not sure how the situation has changed in the last few years, one of the concerns is that TPP would result in the addition of statutory damages being added to the law:

    http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2011-10-31/negima-akamatsu-warns-against-changing-japan-cop yright-law

    That would be a pretty significant change.

     

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  37.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 8:41am

    Re:

    Publishers will. Most certainly foreign publishers who licensed material.

    While they technically are unlikely to have a standing normally, combine the forced enforcement of trade agreements with application of those wretched ISDS provisions and you have a nightmare waiting to happen.

    The trade agreements are the "handwavium" to make this constellation possible to begin with.

     

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  38.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 9:03am

    Creators are fans themselves

    The industry knows that not only does the fan fiction support their business but many professional creators have their roots in these conventions. There are actually many professionals that create fan fiction. Perhaps Library Wars is not fiction after all.

     

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  39.  
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    Alt0, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 9:23am

    No Cosplay? Oh Noes!
    Crap, some of the fake Catwomen were so hot too...

     

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  40.  
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    DogBreath, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 9:50am

    Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Next thing you know, they'll be expecting us to call them "King".

    Well, if it ever comes to that, they'll have to deal with Dennis, The Constitutional Peasant.

     

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  41.  
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    william (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 10:08am

    Re: It's insane to take on Akihabara!

    I am sorry but Ahikhabara has no wraith. Not when it's filled with otaku type. Everyone knows that otaku are usually herbivores.

     

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  42.  
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    Lurker Keith, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 11:08am

    Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Monty Python seems to be popular lately. lol

     

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  43.  
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    Lurker Keith, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 11:23am

    Re: Re: It's insane to take on Akihabara!

    The otaku ARE my point. Already, manga & anime have suffered some set backs from badly written laws in the last few years. This will kill a heck of a lot more of the creativity.

    As has been pointed out, mangaka are already speaking out against it.

    If the otaku lose their anime, manga, & cosplay, & the idols home (Akihabara) changes, there's going to be some anger.

     

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  44.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 2:28pm

    Many quotes...but no apparent link or cite to source.

     

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  45.  
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    Reasonable Reformist, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 3:19pm

    Some countries are apparently demanding that Japan clamp down on knock-off and pirated works in the intellectual property arena, even if the copyright holder does not object to it.


    The world has gone made. In their drive to expand copyright, maximalists want to limit the rights of copyright holders. Copyright holders are not allowed to be okay with fan fiction or piracy of their own work? What's next, outlawing Creative Commons licenses? Copyright maximalism has become an ouroboros: it's eating itself. This is insane.

     

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  46.  
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    Internet Zen Master (profile), Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 5:03pm

    Re:

    Wait, what's this about dA removing the fanart category?

    If that happened, the dA crowd would lose its collective mind in a 'WTF is this bullshit'-type rage.

     

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  47.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 5:28pm

    Re: illegal already

    Except that very often so, copyright enforcement organizations have no qualms about shutting down what they assume is infringement, with or without representation by the rightsholder or even if the rightsholder is affiliated with them. But you wouldn't care, because you assume that anime and manga are only consumed by basement-dwelling teenagers.

     

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  48.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 6:45pm

    Re: illegal already

    Just Sayin' just hates it when due process is enforced.

     

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  49.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 3rd, 2014 @ 8:54pm

    I think this page should include a link to the article

    http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/social_affairs/AJ201403290009

    It seems that some of the text quoted in this article is also located in the other one.

     

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  50.  
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    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 4th, 2014 @ 12:02am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    The big concern which Mike's article fails to convey is that under current copyright law in Japan, the owner of a work has to make a formal complaint before any prosecution for a violation of their copyright can take place.

    This is what exactly would change if TPP in its current form would came to be.

    Also, you argued - imho mistakenly - that commercial spin-offs are bad. You seem to think that building on someones work (spin-off and fan art) and *gasp* making money off your _own_work_ is somehow takes out money of the original artist's pocket, which is in many case the opposite.

    That's not what Anonymous Howard is suggestion. He's suggesting that the authors not exercising their rights in this one subset of circumstances justifies wholesale abolishment of all of the author's rights.

    You're erecting strawmans. Let me quote myself
    Isn't this the prime indicator of an outdated/unnecessary law?

     

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  51.  
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    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 4th, 2014 @ 12:10am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    commercially publishing fanfiction

    The question is still: why is it bad? Most of today's movies, books etc are based on already existing works, and I find it distasteful to grant privileges on who can make things out of them.

    Control which Anonymous Howard proposes removing because the authors don't crack down on fans being fans.

    Again dat strawman. I said if authors don't crack down on fans, then the law should reflect this attitude toward fans. If laws would reflect the socially acceptable behavior, then there would be no need to selectively enforce it (formal complaint/no complaint).

    I don't think any fan art creator like the gun at his head that this maybe-maybenot copyright bullshit presents. They should know when they break a law, and it should not depend on someone else making a complaint about it.

    This is like arguing "the falling tree is only makes sound if someone hears it"

     

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  52.  
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    Niall (profile), Apr 4th, 2014 @ 7:15am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Monty Python is *always* popular, because it's funny *and* insightful.

     

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  53.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 4th, 2014 @ 11:07am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Also, you argued - imho mistakenly - that commercial spin-offs are bad. You seem to think that building on someones work (spin-off and fan art) and *gasp* making money off your _own_work_ is somehow takes out money of the original artist's pocket, which is in many case the opposite.


    I never said anything about fan art. Nor that commercial spin offs were themselves bad. I said that making a spin-off without permission was not a desirable thing.

    You're erecting strawmans. Let me quote myself


    Let me quote you.
    "Isn't this the prime indicator of an outdated/unnecessary law?

    It's all one law. If you're trying to argue that it's unnecessary, then you're arguing that the whole of Japan's copyright law is unnecessary and should be removed. If that is not your intent, you need to be more precise. Especially as your further comments indicate that you do oppose the general requirement for commercials licenses, not just the prospect of it being applied to small time fans that happen to be selling knickknacks a couple times a year.

     

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  54.  
    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 4th, 2014 @ 1:49pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    The question is still: why is it bad? Most of today's movies, books etc are based on already existing works, and I find it distasteful to grant privileges on who can make things out of them.


    So, in other words, you think that authors should be granted no privileges to their work, for any length of time?

    As to why it's bad, you have several reasons. For starters, you're basically declaring it open season for the likes of Disney. Remember that article a few months ago about Disney profiting on the public domain? It'd be like that, only instead of the public domain being decades old classics, it'd be whatever work Disney thought showed potential at the moment. The author of the original work would be left attempting to ride Disney's coat trails, and compete with the novelizations that Disney would put out. Not exactly great circumstances for the original author.

    That assumes that Disney or whoever is successful. Suppose Disney or whoever grabbed first made a flop? Now other people aren't as interested as it's seen as a failure, and the author has a harder time getting people interested in trying a new adaption. Yes authors run this risk anytime they agree to an adaption, but that they have to give their ok means they get some paid compensation for the risk, and have some control over who makes the adaption.

    And of course for publishing fanfiction, it would be pretty easy for the original author's work to be drowned out. It would not be that difficult to end up with a franchise like Star Trek or Forgotten Realm. Only with the original author's work surrounded by a sea of crap with the same name as less scrupulous publishers print anything as a cash grab. Or the story ends up attracting a bunch of stories with a different theme, and the original work ends up outright rejected by the fans of the franchise. Either way leaves the original author to start over from scratch rather than be able to freely build on their universe. While the second scenario can work out well from the public's standpoint, neither one works out well from the author's standpoint. You're also relying much more heavily on the publishers to be quality control, instead of the original author being able to exert some quality control.

    Again dat strawman. I said if authors don't crack down on fans, then the law should reflect this attitude toward fans. If laws would reflect the socially acceptable behavior, then there would be no need to selectively enforce it (formal complaint/no complaint).


    Again, you called the law unnecessary which implies that it should be removed when you're talking about changing things. Even assuming that I'm wrong about the scope of what you're arguing, you are still in essence saying 'The authors are seldom exercising their right to crack down on their fans, and therefore that right should be removed.'

    I don't think any fan art creator like the gun at his head that this maybe-maybenot copyright bullshit presents. They should know when they break a law, and it should not depend on someone else making a complaint about it.


    I doubt most of them think about it at all, or feel like there's a gun pointed at their head. Furthermore, short of setting an arbitrary cutoff, or removing the author's right to control adaptions of their work altogether, there will always be cases where whether or not something is a copyright violation comes down to "Did the author approve of this or not? Does the author want this taken down or not?"

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  55.  
    icon
    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 7th, 2014 @ 3:37am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    First, you contradict yourself:
    "I never said anything about fan art. Nor that commercial spin offs were themselves bad. I said that making a spin-off without permission was not a desirable thing. "

    "It's all one law. "

    Then you don't address my answer, which were about spin-offs AND fan art.

    ". If you're trying to argue that it's unnecessary, then you're arguing that the whole of Japan's copyright law is unnecessary and should be removed. If that is not your intent, you need to be more precise. "

    No, you simply need to look up the interpretation of "/", which is "OR", and voila! Everything make sense.

    You're being difficult on purpose, dim or trolling. In either case, F U.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  56.  
    icon
    Anonymous Howard (profile), Apr 7th, 2014 @ 3:47am

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Laws are for people, not the way around

    Again, you erect strawmen.

    "So, in other words, you think that authors should be granted no privileges to their work, for any length of time? "

    No, and I didn't said that.
    Invoking Disney is a bad example, since they already ignoring everyone else rights, while being obnoxious about theirs.

    "Again, you called the law unnecessary which implies that it should be removed when you're talking about changing things. "

    Again, no. I called the law outdated, and needing to be adjusted to social behavior.

    "I doubt most of them think about it at all, or feel like there's a gun pointed at their head."

    Yes, that were the point of the article. As I said, when you bring TPP to the picture, this will be the case, because it requires governments to crack down on infringement, no matter what.

    You seriously need to improve your comprehension skills, since you answered none of my points correctly.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  57.  
    identicon
    Pragmatic, Apr 8th, 2014 @ 5:54am

    Re: illegal already

    Fair use applies where they acknowledge the original creator and create a genuinely derivative piece of work. Authors generally let the infringement elements slide because hardcore FF writers wanting to learn more about their "fandom's" "canon" buy source works, i.e. films and books, in order to more faithfully recreate the world (or "sandbox") in which the characters they're writing about "live" in.

    Basically, Fan Fiction drives sales to people wanting to improve their knowledge of the subject matter and people who take an interest in it after reading the stories or viewing the artwork.

    It'd be nuts to ban it: doing so would alienate existing fans and reduce your potential market.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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