Japanese Law Enforcement Uses New Copyright Law To Arrest 27 File Sharers

from the lock-'em-up dept

Last year, we noted that Japan had put in place ridiculously draconian copyright laws that criminalized unauthorized downloads, DVD backups and even watching infringing YouTube videos in some cases. And, of course, what good is a law if it's not used? So, Japanese law enforcement apparently went on a big raid, searching 124 locations and arresting 27 people. Those arrested may face between two and ten years in jail, because that's a reasonable punishment for sharing something. I don't see how this makes anyone respect copyright any more, or gives anyone any additional incentive to support the legacy players who are using this system to put fans in jail.

Filed Under: arrests, criminal copyright, file sharing, japan, law enforcement


Reader Comments

Subscribe: RSS

View by: Time | Thread


  1. identicon
    Rekrul, 28 Feb 2013 @ 2:18pm

    Re:

    I wonder how long it will be before industries start pushing for jail time for swapping pre-owned DVDs.

    After all - borrowing a DVD from a friend is also experiencing creativity without paying.


    Actually, if I remember correctly, there was a proposal a few years ago for a new format, where all the media you buy would be tied to one machine forever. Like how downloaded games on a console are forever tied to that console (unless you go through the PITA process of transferring them).

Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here



Subscribe to the Techdirt Daily newsletter




Comment Options:

  • Use markdown. Use plain text.
  • Remember name/email/url (set a cookie)

Follow Techdirt
Techdirt Gear
Shop Now: Copying Is Not Theft
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Essential Reading
Techdirt Deals
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Techdirt Insider Chat
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Recent Stories
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads

Close

Email This

This feature is only available to registered users. Register or sign in to use it.