Who Signed The ITU WCIT Treaty... And Who Didn't

from the the-full-list dept

We already noted this morning that the US, a bunch of European countries, and a sprinkling of other nations around the globe have refused to sign the new ITR agreement put together at the ITU's World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT), even as ITU officials congratulate themselves on a job well done. Many people have asked who signed and who didn't. The ITU has an official list of signatures, which seems to slightly conflict with some earlier reports. Here's their graphic:
Perhaps more useful is this map, in which the signing countries are in black and the non-signing are in red. You might notice a few patterns.
Also, reporter Dave Burstein kindly sent along the full list (embedded below), with signatories in green, non-signatories in red and everyone else in white. The "everyone else" apparently includes countries who haven't paid up their dues and thus can't technically sign on yet, or who don't "have their credentials in order." In other words: bureaucratic blah blah blah. Europe, of course, dominates the non-signing countries. It's somewhat meaningless, but if you tally up population, the signatories cover 3.8 billion people, while the non-signatories cover 2.6 billion. And there are another ~600 million in play in those other countries.

So, what does it all mean? Very little right now. Even those countries that signed on still need to go through a ratification process -- and one hopes that people in some of those countries will realize that it's bad to be supporting a regime that wants political bureaucrats having anything to do with the internet, even if it's dipping a toe in the water. However, many of the countries don't much care about that, and simply want the new rules so they can try to control parts of the internet (and/or profit from it). The rules won't actually go into effect for a while. While they aren't binding, it is pretty customary for signatories to eventually adopt such rules locally.

The real story here is a world in which there are two competing visions for the future of the internet -- one driven by countries who believe the internet should be more open and free... and one driven by the opposite. Whether or not the ITU treaty is ever meaningful or effective, these two visions of the internet are unlikely to go away any time soon. The next decade is going to be filled with similar clashes as certain countries seek to limit what the internet can do, for their own political needs and desires. Seeing the initial breakdown of who's in which camp is useful, but this isn't over yet.


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    identicon
    out_of_the_blue, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 5:50pm

    "So, what does it all mean? Very little right now."

    And THERE we agree at last! Geez, will you QUIT Masnicking this NON-story?

    I'm giving up on you again until at least Monday morning.





    Every click for Mike "Streisand Effect" Masnick is a click for him!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect
    His fame now depends totally on you! He's done all he can!

     

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      Wally (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 5:53pm

      Re: "So, what does it all mean? Very little right now."

      Blue, it's very clear you don't agree with Mike by your bottom statement there about the Streisand Affect. Just give up the god forsaken goat and move on.

       

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        Shadow Dragon (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 6:04pm

        Re: Re: "So, what does it all mean? Very little right now."

        Ditto

         

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        Anonymous Coward, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 7:49pm

        Re: Re: "So, what does it all mean? Very little right now."

        He can't give up the goat, that would require him having a goat. And then enacting god-forsaking acts of terribleness upon it. And then having his goat stolen by software pirates from a distant country.

         

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      silverscarcat (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 6:42pm

      So...

      What do YOU consider to be a story?

      It seems to me, ootb, you consider EVERYTHING a non-story.

      If that's the case, go outside and stick your head in the sand/snowbank (depending on where you are) and stay ignorant.

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 6:59pm

      Re: "So, what does it all mean? Very little right now."

      I'm giving up on you again until at least Monday morning.

      No need to rush back on our account. Take some time off. Get away and go see the sights...for, like, the next century.

      We insist.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Dec 15th, 2012 @ 2:47am

        Re: Re: "So, what does it all mean? Very little right now."

        Well techdirt is pretty much closed over the weekend, a bit like the MPAA where OOTB works, so its no surprise he wont be here.

         

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      Anonymous Coward, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 9:57pm

      Re: "So, what does it all mean? Very little right now."

      "I'm giving up on you again until at least Monday morning."

      Cross your heart and hope to die, boy?

       

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    Wally (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 5:51pm

    What saddens me most...

    What saddens me most is that the nearly unanimous majority of those countries who signed to the treaty is that the people in those countries have no choice due to the current regime in place...,except New Zealand. New Zealand is just mad and butthurt they got caught spying on Kim Dotcom illegally.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 6:43pm

      Re: What saddens me most...

      New Zealand voted no? Are you calling New Zealand a "no choice"-state?

      More worrying would be South Korea and Singapore voting yes. I would expect both to be more inclined to follow the western world where nobody voted yes!

       

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        Wally (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 7:45pm

        Re: Re: What saddens me most...

        With all due respect...."except New Zealand". The people may have a voice there, but given how the Kiwi Government handled the shutdown Megaupload....I'm not surprised they would want that type of embarrassment censored ;-)

         

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        Wally (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 8:05pm

        Re: Re: What saddens me most...

        On a more serious thought to South Korea. Every telecom there is completely monopolized. They hold a bidding war every few years to see which telecom gets the "government contract", in which total control of the state media goes under control to the highest bid...I mean bribe.

        Now what's interesting this is that the citizens in South Korea (especially in Seol....I had an aunt in Army Intelligence stationed there) always find a way around this. The South Korean Government probably knows of that fact and of course I was not surprised of their vote to yes.

         

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      vic, Dec 15th, 2012 @ 3:10pm

      Re: What saddens me most...

      Ummm... New Zealand did not sign...

       

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    ChurchHatesTucker (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 5:55pm

    Matter of time

    The next decade is going to be filled with similar clashes as certain countries seek to limit what the internet can do, for their own political needs and desires

    ALL countries will seek (and have) to limit what the internet can do. Eventually, a "common ground" will be found.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Dec 15th, 2012 @ 11:42am

      Re: Matter of time

      ALL countries will do what is in their best interest. The UN is a farce...

      Funny how the argument is "limit the Internet", but Not limit the Govt. Limiting the Internet is in No one's best interest.

       

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    Chris Maresca, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 6:18pm

    I don't know where the chart comes from but it's wrong

    I just heard both representatives from Egypt & Tunisia on the BBC World Service explain that the internet before their revolutions was controlled and it's now free and they would never support anything that attempted to control it, thus refused to sign...

    So someone is lying, my guess it's the ITU who is 'wishful thinking' a positive result.

     

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      Wally (profile), Dec 14th, 2012 @ 8:49pm

      Re: I don't know where the chart comes from but it's wrong

      I won't question this, but I would like to see the report.

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Dec 15th, 2012 @ 2:51am

      Re: I don't know where the chart comes from but it's wrong

      Actually Eqypt and Tunisia got a piece entered into the agreement about protecting freedom of expression. That is why they signed.

       

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      Alffi, Dec 16th, 2012 @ 6:56am

      Re: I don't know where the chart comes from but it's wrong

      Yes, the map is wrong. Bulgaria didn't sign it
      but is black on the map. Please correct the map or remove it from the site.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 8:10pm

    That first box of green and not green is in frog I do not do frog.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Dec 14th, 2012 @ 9:32pm

    Proud, and completely amazed, to see Australia on the right side of the line for once.

     

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    Not an Electronic Rodent (profile), Dec 15th, 2012 @ 3:21am

    Alternatively...

    one driven by countries who believe the internet should be more open and free... and one driven by the opposite.
    Or that could be read as "One driven by countries who like the control where it is and want to expand it in their own way for their own ends and one by those that want to get their noses in the trough....."

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Dec 15th, 2012 @ 10:57am

    We need a PIL (Political Innovation Lab).

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Dec 15th, 2012 @ 5:33pm

    This reminds me of Yin and Yang. Even our own world is divided into two equally opposing forces. I bet the entire Universe is like this too.

     

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    Kevin (profile), Dec 15th, 2012 @ 11:32pm

    No surpise

    The countries that produce 90% of the world's music haven't signed.
    Now if the whole thing was based on the number of votes allowed was based on the actual contribution each county makes to the world's music it would be a grand slam decision to bury the idea.
    Like the UN 80% of the vote represents counties on the take side and 20% on those who give. Warped.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Dec 16th, 2012 @ 5:47am

    The real story here is a world in which there are two competing visions for the future of the internet -- one driven by countries who believe the internet should be more open and free... and one driven by the opposite.

    If you take this story alone, you could come to that conclusion. But when you look at things like SOPA/PIPA, TPP, ACTA (and to some extent bills like FISA, CISPA, and the Patriot Act), I see a government (and her allies) working very strategically to control the internet. All I see with this initiative is the rest of the world trying to force their hands into that systematic control.

     

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    timmaguire42 (profile), Dec 16th, 2012 @ 6:47am

    I can't help but notice the every country that contributed to the creation of the internet is red. If the black countries wish to censor and/or tax an internet, I fully support their right to create one and do whatever they wish with it.

     

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    timmaguire42 (profile), Dec 16th, 2012 @ 6:48am

    I can't help but notice the every country that contributed to the creation of the internet is red. If the black countries wish to censor and/or tax an internet, I fully support their right to create one and do whatever they wish with it.

     

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    timmaguire42 (profile), Dec 16th, 2012 @ 6:48am

    I can't help but notice the every country that contributed to the creation of the internet is red. If the black countries wish to censor and/or tax an internet, I fully support their right to create one and do whatever they wish with it.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

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    timmaguire42 (profile), Dec 16th, 2012 @ 6:48am

    I can't help but notice the every country that contributed to the creation of the internet is red. If the black countries wish to censor and/or tax an internet, I fully support their right to create one and do whatever they wish with it.

     

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    Gregg, Dec 17th, 2012 @ 7:25am

    Clever...

    What a clever way to separate the Democratic countries from the Fascist states.

     

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    Matt, Dec 17th, 2012 @ 10:39am

    TechPresident posted an excellent piece (http://techpresident.com/news/23263/internet-freedom-activists-dubai-warning-finally-live-inclusive -label-or-else) on why some developing countries, even those with democratically elected governments, might support ITU oversight of the Internet.

    Essentially, the piece's thesis is that the organizations which currently administer the Internet are dominated by western Europeans and North Americans speaking English. Developing countries don't understand how these organizations work or how to get their voice heard there.

    In contrast, UN-affiliated organizations like the ITU are "a known table that every country knows they have a seat at".

    I don't think the ITU should be running things either. But it's probably too simplistic to say any country that supported ITU oversight of the Internet did so because they want to limit freedoms.

     

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    ASDFGHJKL, Mar 9th, 2013 @ 7:56am

    Thank you

    I'm agree with the Anonymous We need a PIL (Political Innovation Lab).

     

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    JEE MAIN Results 2013, May 6th, 2013 @ 9:09am

    This is nice

    We too need a PIL (Political Innovation Lab).

     

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    Best Out Of Waste, Aug 2nd, 2013 @ 4:59am

    Re:

    This reminds me of Yin and Yang. Even our own world is divided into two equally opposing forces. I bet the entire Universe is like this too.

     

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    Government Jobs, Sep 5th, 2013 @ 1:41am

    I also agree that, We must need a PIL (Political Innovation Lab).

     

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