Three Key EU Parliament Committees Vote 'Just Say No' To ACTA

from the some-good-news dept

While some have believed that ACTA is already dead in Europe, there are still actual votes to be held, and there have been significant concerns that political trickery might lead to ACTA actually being approved. The first three key votes (from three specific committees) happened today, and while it was close, all three came out with recommendations to reject ACTA. As Rick Falkvinge points out, one telling point is if you look at the votes on the Committee on Legal Affairs (Juri) and the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The winning proposal for ITRE was drafted by Pirate Party MEP (and occasional Techdirt contributor) Amelia Andersdotter. The losing proposal for Juri was written by Marielle Gallo -- author of the infamous Gallo Report a few years ago, pushing the EU Parliament to support massively draconian IP enforcement rules. In other words, "the pirate" vs. "the copyright maximalist" in an EU Parlimantary committee votes... and the pirate won. Not too long ago, such a result would be unthinkable. However, it shows how quickly things can shift when you have reality on your side...

Filed Under: acta, amelia andersdotter, european union, itre, marielle gallo, pirate party, rick falkvinge


Reader Comments

Subscribe: RSS

View by: Time | Thread


  1. icon
    Cerberus (profile), 31 May 2012 @ 10:22pm

    Rejoice! ACTA has already been permanently vetoed for the entire EU by the Netherlands.

    I read on ZDnet.co.uk, whose David Meyer had been informed of this by an e-mail from the European Commission, that the EU can only ratify ACTA if all member states have ratified. Given the Dutch total rejection, this means that the EU cannot ratify ACTA at all, even if the European Parliament should vote for ACTA. The e-mail also says that no individual member states will ratify ACTA if the EU will not ratify it; that would mean that the Dutch rejection prevents all other member states from individually ratifying ACTA as well. So the battle seems over.

    That really is what the European Commission is telling me. To give a precise quote: if a member state turns down the agreement, "ACTA will stay a valid international agreement but the EU and its member states will not deposit their instrument of ratification until all member states and the European Parliament have ratified it". If you don't deposit your instrument of ratification, the rules say, you don't play." — David Meyer 6 February, 2012 08:08 http://www.zdnet.co.uk/news/intellectual-property/2012/02/03/actas-eu-future-in-doubt-after-polish-p ause-40094978/#comments


    Add to that the background and the actual articles given on the following page, and it seems ACTA is really, truly dead in the EU. Rejoice!

    The Commission proposal says: "... For this reason, the Commission proposes that ACTA be signed and concluded both by the EU and by all the Member States.
    (...)
    So ACTA is presented as a mixed agreement. The rules for that can be found in the Nice Treaty. Under (Nice) Treaty establishing the European Community art 133.6 “the negotiation of such agreements shall require the common accord of the Member States”. Common accord: the EU member states do have a veto. — http://acta.ffii.org/?p=1122

Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here



Subscribe to the Techdirt Daily newsletter




Comment Options:

  • Use markdown. Use plain text.
  • Remember name/email/url (set a cookie)

Follow Techdirt
Techdirt Gear
Shop Now: I Invented Email
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Essential Reading
Techdirt Deals
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Techdirt Insider Chat
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Recent Stories
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads

Close

Email This

This feature is only available to registered users. Register or sign in to use it.