Insanity: CISPA Just Got Way Worse, And Then Passed On Rushed Vote

from the this-is-crazy dept

Update: Several people have asserted that Quayle's amendment actually made CISPA better, not worse. I've now posted my thoughts on that.

Up until this afternoon, the final vote on CISPA was supposed to be tomorrow. Then, abruptly, it was moved up today—and the House voted in favor of its passage with a vote of 248-168. But that's not even the worst part.

The vote followed the debate on amendments, several of which were passed. Among them was an absolutely terrible change (pdf and embedded below—scroll to amendment #6) to the definition of what the government can do with shared information, put forth by Rep. Quayle. Astonishingly, it was described as limiting the government's power, even though it in fact expands it by adding more items to the list of acceptable purposes for which shared information can be used. Even more astonishingly, it passed with a near-unanimous vote. The CISPA that was just approved by the House is much worse than the CISPA being discussed as recently as this morning.

Previously, CISPA allowed the government to use information for "cybersecurity" or "national security" purposes. Those purposes have not been limited or removed. Instead, three more valid uses have been added: investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals, and protection of children. Cybersecurity crime is defined as any crime involving network disruption or hacking, plus any violation of the CFAA.

Basically this means CISPA can no longer be called a cybersecurity bill at all. The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a "cybersecurity crime". Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all. Moreover, the government could do whatever it wants with the data as long as it can claim that someone was in danger of bodily harm, or that children were somehow threatened—again, notwithstanding absolutely any other law that would normally limit the government's power.

Somehow, incredibly, this was described as limiting CISPA, but it accomplishes the exact opposite. This is very, very bad.

There were some good amendments adopted too—clarifying some definitions, including the fact that merely violating a TOS does not constitute unauthorized network access—but frankly none of them matter in the light of this change. CISPA is now a completely unsupportable bill that rewrites (and effectively eliminates) all privacy laws for any situation that involves a computer. Far from the defense against malevolent foreign entities that the bill was described as by its authors, it is now an explicit attack on the freedoms of every American.



Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  •  
    icon
    BreadGod (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:46pm

    "investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals, and protection of children."

    Protect the children is the most convenient excuse ever created.

     

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      ChurchHatesTucker (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:00pm

      Re:

      Are children not individuals now?

       

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        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:29pm

        Re: Re:

        Apparently Children > Individuals - because we pass all sorts of laws that protect them while removing rights from individuals.

        What I wouldn't give to be 17 again, so I can have more rights and protections than grown-ups. Hell, maybe with my newfound rights, I'd have the power to actually pass some laws that made sense!

         

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          Tobias Harms (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:26pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          You only say that until you become a registered sexoffender for having sex with an younger girl/boyfriend. Or for extra fun. You send a naked picture of yourself to your SO and you get convicted for spreading of childponografy.
          But hey! We only do this to protect the children...

           

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:12pm

      Re:

      Whenever someone claims it's "for the children" they're lying. It's not. It's for them.

       

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      identicon
      Kallero, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:42pm

      Re:

      "National security" is pretty damn nifty, too.

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Rage Incarnate, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:32pm

      Re:

      FUCK the children as an excuse for this utter bullshittery! Shred CISPA and burn it into non-existence, than defenestrate the people responsible!

       

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        Chargone (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:11am

        Re: Re:

        the first part of that sounded....

        ... really bad.

        hehe.

        defenestration is amusing... ideally one uses tall buildings, but using the ground floor window is plenty amusing without those pesky murder/manslaughter charges...

         

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        •  
          identicon
          Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 10:41am

          Re: Re: Re:

          You have to listen all the time about children. It's all you hear in this country. Children! Help the children! What about the children! Save the children! You know what I say?

          Fuck the children!

           

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:57pm

      Re:

      TERRORISM!

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:21pm

      Re:

      CHILDRENISM!

       

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    •  
      identicon
      caturday, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 5:47am

      Re:

      Except, perhaps, for "God did it."

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Long Observation, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:45am

      Re:

      Their minds are belong to US until they are 18 or 21 or longer.

       

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      identicon
      Long Observation, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:48am

      Re:

      Their minds are belong to US until they are 18 or 21 or longer.

       

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      identicon
      Steve, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:26pm

      Response to: BreadGod on Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:46pm

      "Won't somebody Please think of the children!" -Helen Lovejoy

       

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      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:24pm

      Re:

      For fear of Godwining... 'Protecting the Children' was the official reason for starting the Hitler Youth... recruiting children to tell on their parents.

      Scary thought, yo.

       

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      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 11:37pm

      Re:

      buckle up kiddies... this isn't insanity, it's reality, something techdirt fanb01s seem to have trouble grasping.

      next up, the stop online piracy and cyber terrorism defense act...

      pirates? / hackers? / hackers? / pirates? hmmmmm...

       

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      identicon
      Pachi, May 1st, 2012 @ 11:57pm

      Re:

      I'm sure that, by this law, any of the voters can be accused judged, and found guilty of some cibercrime.

       

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      FFatty man, May 3rd, 2012 @ 7:50am

      Re: BreadGod

      protect the children my ass im 17 and have been "shareing media" for 4 years now what are the protecting us from ... and whatever the reply is they should only block lemonparty.com and sites alike

       

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      CrazyDragonLord, Sep 16th, 2012 @ 8:09pm

      Reply

      And it NEVER works.

       

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    hfbs (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:48pm

    Well, shit.

     

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    :Lobo Santo (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:51pm

    Worse, give the present definition of 'hacking'

    "hacking" v. : Any thing which may under any circumstance be described in any manner as a crime; provided electrons are involved.

     

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      identicon
      DX411, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:00pm

      Re: Worse, give the present definition of 'hacking'

      I plan to hit you over the head with my computer. I am now SU~PA HAKA!

       

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      identicon
      Colby, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:32am

      Re: Worse, give the present definition of 'hacking'

      So by that definition looming at someones profile and leaving an inside joke that sounds like a threat could be a threat.

       

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      Manypockets, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:58am

      Re: Worse, give the present definition of 'hacking'

      So, since practically all elemental matter has electrons, then every crime is hacking now?

      This is the stupidest thing I think I have ever seen.

       

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      Al, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 9:32am

      Re: Worse, give the present definition of 'hacking'

      That is horrible! Where did you find this definition? If it was in the PDF, what page? Thanks!

       

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      Anonymous, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:41pm

      Re: Worse, give the present definition of 'hacking'

      hackers should be free just like the world.

       

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    :Lobo Santo (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:52pm

    Hey wait!

    Didn't Obizzle say he was going to VETO this shiznit??

    Let's find out.

     

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      Nathan F (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:53pm

      Re: Hey wait!

      Actually his staff said they would recommend to him that he veto it. Hopefully he will listen to them after the shit they just pulled.

       

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        ThumbsUpThumbsDown (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:44pm

        Re: Re: Hey wait!

        He might veto it if he looked out the White house window and saw a public reaction Tsunami higher than Mount Everest cresting over the Potomac.

         

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        Joshua M, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 8:56pm

        Re: Re: Hey wait!

        He would most likely listen, Obama has a history of listening to his advisors and is why he hits the middle right in most of his policy making, because most of his advisors are moderate conservatives(a rare breed, which is why the right see's him as a leftist lol). :)

         

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      Andrew F (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:06pm

      Re: Hey wait!

      Also still has to pass the Senate, right? And it looks like it's shy of 2/3, so a veto could work.

       

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      identicon
      arcan, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:47pm

      Re: Hey wait!

      it does not matter if obama vetos this or not. if it passes the senate with a similar vote they can overide the veto.

       

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      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:12pm

      Re: Hey wait!

      HAHAHAHA you actually think obama cares about us. He didn't stop NDAA and he won't stop this. He already said that he would veto it until those changes were added. They added them now so hes gonna let it go through. Sucks huh.

       

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      identicon
      Ülfric Stormclöak, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:13pm

      Re: Hey wait!

      I'm pretty sure he said he would cease dea raids on medical marijuana dispensaries, end the bush tax cuts, open talks about the federal decriminalization and reschduling of marijuana, fix the economy, create jobs and veto ndaa 2012, let's just say I'm suffering from the wors case of voters remorse for George W Obama. VERMIN SUPREME 2012

       

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      identicon
      Anon, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:59pm

      Re: Hey wait!

      Yeah, he also said he was going to veto the NDAA....and look how that shit turned out.

       

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      identicon
      Bob, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:31am

      Re: Hey wait!

      You believe anything Obama says? When the guy yelled out he was a liar guess what?? He was absolutely right! I'm still waiting for the transparency..not.

       

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      Uninformed Uniformity, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:42am

      Re: Hey wait!

      A Veto on this would look DAMN GOOD on his resume!

       

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      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:38am

      Re: Probably not

      He did say that, but he also said he would veto the NDAA and he ended up signing that into law. He is a master manipulator.

       

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      identicon
      Henni, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 10:37am

      Re: Hey wait!

      Yep, just like he said he was going to do with the NDAA as his administration pushed it.

       

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      PGies, May 1st, 2012 @ 8:04am

      Re: Hey wait!

      Like how he vetoed the NDAA with indefinite detention of civilians?

       

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    identicon
    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:53pm

    Enjoy 1984.

     

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    identicon
    6, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:54pm

    Mike, you do know that the congress cannot overrule the 4th amendment by mere statute correct? They can pass all these lawls they wish to, if the 4th amendment would be tread upon by any of these actions then the 4th amendment "overrules" whatever these statutes say.

     

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      RonKaminsky (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:01pm

      Re:

      Wow, yes, I hadn't thought of that. Is it similar to how they cannot extend the term of copyright as much as they want because the Constitution says it is for a "limited time"?

      Er, never mind...

       

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        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:48pm

        Re: Re:

        Quick, define limited time.

         

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          identicon
          Dave, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:00pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          Umm... Forever minus a day?

           

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          Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:53pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          Have you ever let someone borrow something for a limited time? If so, how long past their death did that limited time go for? So OK, it's a bit socially awkward to ask the widow for your lawn mower back at the funeral, but I'm sure you'd want it back before next spring.

           

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            identicon
            Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:21pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re:

            Doubly so if she is still mowing the law every week with it.

            Sorry, failed analogy.

             

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              identicon
              Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:20pm

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

              triply so if I agreed with her husband to allow him to have it for 75 years, no matter what. I wouldn't want to go back on my agreement just because he died younger than expected.

               

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                Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:26am

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

                You ask what limited time is, and use the law to defend your position? That's a bit circular. You know what limited is, and you know doubly well that 75 years ain't it, and you know triply well that 75 years plus the life of the author ain't it either. So you go with "The law says it is so it must be"? That's circular, and it's wrong.

                 

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      identicon
      Rob, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:02pm

      Re:

      Not quite correct.

      The statute holds until it's challenged, which allows plenty of abuse of the 4th (How many thousands of warrantless GPS were there?)

       

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      identicon
      ZombieBotsFromMars, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:02pm

      Re:

      I'm thinking the 5th might come into play too. I hope they enjoy seeing a lot of porn links pop up in the results...well we know secret service will.

       

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        Gwiz (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:39pm

        Re: Re:

        I'm thinking the 5th might come into play too.

        I'm thinking about drinking a 5th after reading this article.

         

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          identicon
          LOL, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:02am

          Re: Re: Re:

          I laughed so hard.. DON'T DO IT >:-D

           

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            identicon
            On the Other Hand, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:16am

            Re: Re: Re: Re:

            This CISPA IS a big display of POWER tHEY have. They also have BIG Military ready to snap to/ PLUS some of those can FLY A-10s like MADMEN and Google-like cars driving everywhere and IR to remotely access you. This VERY SCARY to WATCH/ unfold. Omnipresence is only part of the puzzle.

             

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        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:27pm

        Re: Re:

        Actually, I was thinking more of the 2nd...

         

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      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:03pm

      Re:

      True. But the supreme court says that if you give your data over to someone else you then your lose 4th amendment protections. So the 4th amendment practically doesn't apply online at all.

       

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        identicon
        anon, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:59pm

        Re: Re:

        just like you give the post office the right to read your mail when you send a letter.

        Or maybe you are just wrong.

         

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        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 11:18pm

        Re: Re:

        That's not true. As long as your data is recognizable as yours, such as with a name, it is always protected by copyright. It's only if the owner of the data gives it over completely anonymously that it loses copyright protection.

         

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      Leigh Beadon (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:04pm

      Re:

      As per the comments above me, I stand by the statement - this is an effective attack on the 4th amendment.

      But, yes, I worded it somewhat bluntly - after watching C-SPAN for the past two hours, I have very little patience left for circumlocution and tortured phrasing...

       

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      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:07pm

      Re:

      The problem is the fourth amendment only applies to searches and seizures done by the government. If the government can coerce private companies into `voluntarily' handing over information, then it wasn't technically a search, and the warrant requirement is effectively removed from the online materials.

      This is a problem now as well, but privacy policies and other restrictions prevent the government from abusing this power. However, CISPA indemnifies private companies for sharing information with the government, so most of these protections lose their effectiveness.

       

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        identicon
        rubberpants, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:44pm

        Re: Re:

        Corporations and government walking hand in sweaty hand for the good of all mankind.

         

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        identicon
        Anonymous Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:00pm

        Re: Re:

        Isn't there a rule where the private corporation becomes an agent of the government, and therefore the same rules apply? Or have I been watching too much Law and Order?

         

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        identicon
        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:29pm

        Re: Re:

        Amendment IV:
        The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall be issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

        Article VI paragraph 2 of the Constitution
        This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.

        Nowhere in the 4th amendment does it say that the law is limited to just the government. Anyone who took an oath to protect the Constitution is obligated to fight against lwas like this.

        Oath of the enlisted

        I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

        Nowhere does it say to obey the senators or representatives or the laws they make.

         

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          Chargone (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:17am

          Re: Re: Re:

          well, there you go then... arrange for there to not Be a legitimate president for a while, rise up against the rest of the government and corporations in the name of the constitution, and by their own oath the military would need to follow You.

          or put 'em in a situation of picking between the president and the constitution, i guess.

          i mean, at this point 'enemies... domestic' pretty much covers 90% of your corporations and government, no?

           

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        •  
          identicon
          Well,, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:42am

          Re: Re: Re:

          I'm not saying for sure, but I think you'll be standing on a rather slippery slope if you go there. I'm just saying.. >:-D

           

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:07pm

      Re:

      It only overrules it 5+ years after the harm has been done and your case finally makes it to the supreme court.

      Actually, you'll never see the data sharing, so you'll never know the harm done. Any effort to bring it up in court will be shushed with the 'State Secret' trump card.

       

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      Christine Sandquist (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:21pm

      Re:

      While it's certainly true that the 4th amendment is above congressional law, someone has to step up and challenge it for it to be overruled by the SCOTUS. The SCOTUS also have to agree that it's a case they want to take on. It's not so simple as someone pointing out that "Oh, you can't do that. Lulz!" Basically, just because a law may be unconstitutional doesn't mean that it'll be overruled right off. And given that our current SCOTUS tends to be fairly happy with giving the government more power (and isn't exactly up to speed on how technology works), I am not so certain we'd manage to get a majority against this. We'd probably get Sotomayor, Breyer, and Ginsburg, but the rest are fairly iffy...

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:31pm

      Re:

      You think the Supreme Court would actually side with the civilians vs the government over CISPA? The same supreme court who has been on a roll eroding the fourth amendment, among many other awful, inexplicably bad decisions the last few years?

       

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      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:05pm

      Re:

      The data collection is exempt from the FOIA. How in the flying fuck is anyone going to challenge the constitutionality of a law they can't prove is even being used?

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:14pm

      Re:

      Yet these same idiots keep trying. Look at all of the attacks on the Second Amendment.

       

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    •  
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      Andrew S. (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:03pm

      Re:

      That's the beauty (horror) of the third party doctrine. Basically, the Supreme Court has held that there are no 4th amendment rights in anything someone exposes to a third party.

      Therefore:
      The fourth amendment doesn't protect anything on the internet, because it is all exposed to ISP's, service providers, etc.

       

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    •  
      identicon
      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:59pm

      Re:

      You mean like how the fourth amendment protects you at airports?

       

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      identicon
      oes, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:38pm

      Re:

      The issue is that our system of law is based on common law rather than civil law. Meaning precedent is king. If courts rule in favor of prosecution once this legislature is put into practice it won't matter what the 4th amendment says.

       

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      Jackson, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:23am

      Re:

      In theory...

       

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      Jewltone, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:55am

      Re:

      4th Amendment & Search & Seizure.
      FYI from IT Law - http://itlaw.wikia.com/wiki/Fourth_Amendment

      Determination of reasonableness depends on the judicial balancing of the individual interest, generally regarded as a privacy interest, against the governmental interest, including law and order, national security, internal security, and the proper administration of the laws.

      Due to passing of new laws and regulations in regards to national security the definition of probable cause has changed quite a bit and US citizens have been desensitized by very public searches via TSA and Security.

      Before you say the 4th amendment protects you, you better understand that warrants are no longer required, they are encouraged. That probable cause has very new definitions and interpretations since 911.

      Though I would absolutely love for you to be right.
      I have personally witnessed searches that did not have probable cause. That were "random" in the name of avoiding racial profiling and targeting.

       

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        Meat, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 10:16am

        Re: Re:

        I was riding my beach cruiser behind some shops west of the tracks in Dania Florida looking to see if anyone had thrown out an old screen door I might be able to use and had just crossed east back over the tracks trying to pick a piece of meat stuck in my teeth from lunch when I got pulled over by a Broward County Cowboy who saw me with my tounge trying to unstick the annoying meat (grizzle from a hamburger). He searched my mouth for crack cocaine right there on main street with a flashlight (up & down, front & back right & left, twice) temporarily cuffed me until backup arrived and after 45 minutes gets a reply back from HQ that I had no priors, then lets me go. Probable cause had just given way to reasonable suspicion and that was one interpretation of it, I guess.

         

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      Anon, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 9:09am

      Re:

      Yeah, I bet you'll be crying "FOURTH AMENDMENT" when the pow-lice are tackling your ass to the ground because of your torrented porno collection. It's a danger to the children, apparently.

       

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      Doug, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 10:55am

      Re:

      Although you are correct on that, how many peoples lives will be affected that cannot afford high priced attorney's before someone gets it to the Supreme Court? This is where uncanstitutional laws are a detriment to freedom. What we need is to only elect candidates that are serious about taking their oath to protect and defend the Constitution seriously, no matter what. Nobody will be spot on in every issue for us, but right now, the destruction that has been happening, at an alarming rate, to our Constitution should be our main concern.

       

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      Jerry, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 1:22pm

      Re:

      Yeah, that's how it's supposed to work. That is not what has been happening, though.

       

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      J, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 1:48pm

      Re:

      You do realize the congress wipes their ass with the constitution, right?

      To them it's just a piece of paper.

      Has been for 150 years.
      And even the founders didn't much like the constitution.

      When told of the constitutional convention in Philadelphia which was a secret closed-door meeting of the elites which dictated the government structure to the rest of the society, Patrick Henry refused to take part and said "I smell a rat in Philadelphia".

      The things you all cite as "good" about the constitution are NOT PART OF THE CONSTITUTION.

      The bill of rights are a separate document that "amends" the constitution to protect us FROM the constitution's central government. The irony was many of the people who wrote the constitution, like Hamilton, actually said the Bill of Rights (the 10 amendments) was un-necessary, because he said the federal government would never overstep it's authority.

      Basically it was written by a bunch of power hungry elites behind closed doors just as CISPA was today. Some things never change.

      And we thought a tea tax was bad.
      Now we have genital groping at airports. What idiocy.

       

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      Ozlanthos, Apr 18th, 2013 @ 12:47pm

      Re:

      I am with you on this one! However, I have ZERO confidence the Supreme Court will see it that way...

      -Oz

       

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      SteveW, Apr 21st, 2013 @ 4:47pm

      Re:

      The 4th amendment? No amendment has been more consistently crapped on by congress and the executive in the past 10 years. I don't believe it will be used any time soon by any court to strike this or anything similar down.

       

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    Chris ODonnell (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:58pm

    The 4th amendment will not protect the hundreds of not thousands of people that are wrongly convicted of crimes in the next few years before this proposed law eventually gets reviewed by SCOTUS. And given the current makeup of SCOTUS, I'm not real confident they'll see it as in conflict with any existing constitutional protections.

    Also- Mike didn't write the post.

     

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      daniel, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:10pm

      Response to: Chris ODonnell on Apr 26th, 2012 @ 3:58pm

      I don't know think SCOTUS would allow this to stand if it came to them. I think Kennedy would swing judgment against CISPA.

       

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      Bill Stewart, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:46pm

      Re: Evading The 4th Amendment

      It's worse than Chris O'Donnell says. It's not just that the 4th Amendment won't protect you from criminal prosecution for "cybersecurity" violations before somebody successfully appeals it in Federal court (which the Justice Department might or might not appeal up to the Supremes), though that's certainly true.

      It's also that CISPA lets the Feds and maybe other police demand information from your ISP on extremely flexible grounds, just as wiretaps let them get your information from phone companies, so they can collect all your Internet traffic just because they feel like going fishing, even if they don't end up accusing you of a crime, as long as they might be able to link it to protecting children from interference with their rights to license protected Disney intellectual property, etc.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:03pm

    Bawk, bawk, the sky is falling, the sky is falling.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:04pm

    Seems like a fitting homage to World Intellectual Property Day

     

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      Chosen Reject (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:15pm

      Re:

      I thought it was more because Osama Bin Laden's family is leaving Pakistan today. What an awesome excuse to pass this. First off, more attention in the 10 o'clock news about the relatives of a dead terrorist than to some bill in congress. Secondly, what a great segue if it does come up. You can surround the news of CISPA with a reminder of atrocious terrorist acts on one side and with the Etan Patz case on the other. Most people will then just eat it up.

       

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    Keii (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:08pm

    Makes you wonder

    I wonder if this thing getting rushed to pass has anything to do with all of these sudden cyber threats coming from Iran.
    Seems kind of shady that Iran is threatening our cyber security and the same day this thing passes.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:32pm

      Re: Makes you wonder

      Seems kind of shady?

      "There should be little doubt that a country that kills innocent people around the world, guns down its own people, and threatens Israel would not hesitate to carry out a cyber-attack against the U.S.," said counterterrorism and intelligence subcommittee chairman Patrick Meehan

      Perhaps the only doubt should be that as Iran is the only country that seems to be suffering under a deluge of cyber attacks, is the doubt about precisely what it is that Meehan is smoking?

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:08pm

      Re: Makes you wonder

      "Seems kind of shady that Iran is threatening our cyber security and the same day this thing passes."

      Another form of WMD's and aluminum tubes.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:17pm

    They're climbing in our networks snatching our packets up and trying to read them so you need to hide your keys, change your passwords, and clear your history, 'cause they're snooping on everybody out here.

     

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    gorehound (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:18pm

    I hate this fucking Government more and more.I have nothing else to say as nothing else is needed.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:24pm

    Far from the defense against malevolent foreign entities that the bill was described as by its authors, it is now an explicit attack on the freedoms of every American.

    Wow, a Canadian wrapping himself in the American flag. How cute. Why not save your self-righteous bullshit for matters in your own fucked up country?

     

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      Leigh Beadon (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:27pm

      Re:

      I'm just telling you what's happening. If you want to ignore me because I'm Canadian, that's fine - I don't mind.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:44pm

        Re: Re:

        I think the dude's just racist against Canadian's.

        Prolly believes this song, too.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuPqN498G_w

         

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        sirlivealot (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:00pm

        Re: Re:

        A classic Canadian being super polite response.

        This bill does not bode well for Canada. It will be another one we have to try and defend against one day like we are still doing with bill C-11.

         

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        Toadel, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:13pm

        Re: Re:

        Canadians are always in American business. Watch the BBC because you hail to the queen and England's politics. Keep your nose out of America's business.

         

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          yeah, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:46pm

          Re: Re: Re:

          we will when you do.

           

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            Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:20am

            Re: Re: Re: Re:

            Kinda agree, i think people are genuinly getting REALLY worked up about this, but are leaving or hoping that others who are worked up, to do something about it, but if everyone is thinking that, then fuck all will change, like me, ill admit, ill probabaly wont do much apart from the odd comments here and there.......the only exception i feel, if i think about it, is if something big comes along, or a clear message to governments is happening like world wide massive protests........then i can see myself joining in proactively, however limited, but yeah, if im honest with myself, until that something comes along, its unlikely me, or anyone will do anything about it.

            I hope to god im wrong, but.......???

            remember, our best offense is communication, where else can you have whisperings of a protest in one part of the world, and have those same whisperings reapeted within mintutes in the other side of the world?

             

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          Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:28am

          Re: Re: Re:

          read a book jackass.

           

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:44pm

      Re:

      Got nothin' better to do than rail at a reporter for reporting?

       

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      MrWilson, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:10pm

      Re:

      It's cute how you ignore the fact that this will inevitably affect Canadians since their conservative party will probably try to pass something like this, not to mention this will involve information on Canadians since the internet doesn't have political borders.

       

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        it seems that, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:02pm

        Re: Re:

        no matter what country you live in we all have one thing most certain in commen.

        its that republicans are a virus.

        note: this does not apply to republicans with commen sense.

         

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          Chargone (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:23am

          Re: Re: Re:

          i dunno, given the way most republics seem to be going you'd be hard pressed to tell me 'republican' and 'common sense' have much to do with each other these days :P

          'democracy' at least of the representative sort, hardly seems to be all it's cracked up to be (whatever the hell that means) either... so i don't think democrats are really any better.

          personally, i'm quite happy being a monarchist :P

           

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        chris, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:09am

        Re: Re:

        They are already trying to.. =S

         

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        Ozz, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 5:24am

        Re: Re:

        Especially since 2005-6's North American Union of U.S., Canada, and Mehico....

         

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      david, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:26pm

      Re:

      Canadians are Americans fool we just live in a different part of america look another person wrapping themselves in idiocy

       

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        Me, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:04pm

        Re: Re:

        Being Canadian does not make you part of the great nation under the American flag (even if governmentally questionable), so shut up with your attempt at a clever retort.

         

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:14pm

        Re: Re:

        Who the hell cares about the canada america debate? Regardless of where we are this shit is happening and its real. Unfortunately for all of us. So everyone learn to agree that yes no matter what way you spin this its bad and something needs to be done about it. (Not that anotther internet blackout will work but hey we can hope)

         

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        ariotshield (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:20pm

        Re: Re:

        Yeah, and you guys all try to act like big brother. Always in our business and trying to lend a helping hand, eh?

        Yes, you're part of North America but you are not part of the United States of America. You're part of the Great White North, eh. So, hail to the queen because you follow England's politics. You should be more interested in what they're up to instead of us.

         

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          Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:00am

          Re: Re: Re:

          Holy hell, that might just be the single most ignorant thing I have ever read. The Americans and Canadians are economically intertwined. Canadas largest trading partner is the US, and vice versa. It's not just economics, either. Canada and the US's military work very closely together. These are just a few of the myriad of things the Americans and Canadians share. Canadians are interested in American politics because they are aware of how it's going to affect them. Canada, especially recently, has been adopting American laws. For you to say that the Canadians should be more interested in British politics is like saying the Americans should be interested in French politics; it just doesn't make any sense.

           

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        The Moondoggie, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:30pm

        Re: Re:O.M.Gawd!

        This! This explains Justin Beiber! While being Canadian, he sucks ass as a U.S. performer! And why he looks like a total whimp.

         

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      JMT (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:38pm

      Re:

      "...save your self-righteous bullshit..."

      Wait, so you disagree with the article, and think CISPA is a good thing? Really? Care to explain?

       

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      Doesnt matter, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:22pm

      Response to: Anonymous Coward on Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:24pm

      Not sure if uv followed the whole group of BS goin on in the world, but illuminati have actually disabled the borders between canada and the US. Meaning they can come arrest anyone in North America under "probable cause". This cispa garbage effects everyone everywhere essentially.

      So my question is, do u not want help from fellow human biengs to stop sucha notrosious bill that will essentailly limit every action done by everyone on the world wide web?

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:43pm

      Response to: Anonymous Coward on Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:24pm

      Didn't know only Americans can have valid opinions about American problems.

       

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        ariotshield (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:24pm

        Re: Response to: Anonymous Coward on Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:24pm

        We all know Canadians are always in on American politics. The American election was the most watched show in Canada. Sounds like you guys just want to become part of these great states, eh. It's nice that you guys care, but nothing will come of your care. You'll only gloat when bills pass and harp on about how Canada is better.

        Ah, how I enjoy my unmetered bandwidth. Oh, wait... Canada doesn't get that. :)

         

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:35pm

      Awww, poor baby! Somebody got their panty's in a bunch. How cute. Is it because having that red, white, and blue dick jammed up your ass is cutting off the circulation from your brain? Otherwise, you'd know that fascist bills like these effect more then Americans. Like how the Patriot Act has been used for drug stings against Canadians. Btw - How's the drug war going? Oh, right. Epic fail.

      I'll take a freedom loving Canadian over a freedom hating American any day...

       

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      Niall (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:32am

      Re:

      Unfortunately for the rest of the world, America's freedoms are our 'freedoms' as you have the bad habit of trying to export them everywhere else. So yes, we care. Plus, you're the loudest whiners on a number of topics :)

       

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    Technoir, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:32pm

    In essence they're saying it will be safer to just not be connected to the net than if you are. They could find any reason to charge anyone, it seems like. Suspicious activity or searches of any kind. Who cares if its for a school project, a Google search for "hacking" might land you in trouble?

     

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    John Fenderson (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:44pm

    It's finally time

    I guess it's finally time to start using Tor for all of my internet activities.

     

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      Fighter Fei (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:48pm

      Re: It's finally time

      That would be a good strategy except the good folks behind TOR have absolutely no reason for noncompliance. CISPA doesn't DISCOURAGE the freeflow of information between parties in any meaningful way (if it does so at all).

       

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        Watchit (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:46pm

        Re: Re: It's finally time

        I trust the people at Tor with my data more than I trust the government.

         

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          Chargone (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:28am

          Re: Re: Re: It's finally time

          replace 'Tor' with pretty much any person or organization which is not a government lacky (including nigerian scammers) and it holds true...

          other governments you need to also exclude 'scammers and conartists' before it holds, but not much else.

           

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        aldestrawk (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:54pm

        Re: Re: It's finally time

        One of the characteristics of TOR is that a message transmitted through the network will travel through node(s) that are not subject to a single country's laws. Also, you personally could host a TOR node. I'm sure there are people who are willing to do this in the US who are motivated not to voluntarily share information with the government.

        I am certainly motivated, after reading recent articles on NSA's Bluffdale, Utah facility which included the fact that Stellar Wind uses at least 10 to 20 intercept points in our telecom infrastructure. This certainly has undercut and continues to undercut the 4th amendment I am motivated because CISPA will legitimize, unless it is found contrary to the 4th amendment, arbitrary surveillance leading to a surveillance state. A surveillance state, for sure, provides the tools to protect from terrorism, cybercrime, etc. but at the same time provides the infrastructure for a totalitarian state. I am now motivated and will be sending in my resume tonight to work full time on the TOR project as I saw this week they have a software opening.

         

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          Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:58pm

          Re: Re: Re: It's finally time

          "One of the characteristics of TOR is that a message transmitted through the network will travel through node(s) that are not subject to a single country's laws."

          As always, it has a start point, and an end point. The nodes in a given country would be subject to that country's laws.

          Good look. TOR is just another way for those who want to break the laws to try to help each other do it. Not very cool, really.

           

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            aldestrawk (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:53pm

            Re: Re: Re: Re: It's finally time

            Like anything valuable, it can be abused. I think having the capability of anonymity on the internet is too important to forgo because there are some criminals, terrorists, pedophiles etc. who would also use it as a tool. They can be caught or stopped in other ways. With global surveillance and data mining quickly becoming a technological possibility, anonymity provides a way for dissidents to communicate, which is an important tool to fight tyranny.

             

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              Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:21pm

              Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: It's finally time

              Well, let me ask you this: If you had any chance of liablity in allowing your computer to be a TOR node, would you actually let it run?

               

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                Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:19am

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: It's finally time

                It is possible to run a Tor node as middle rather than exit relay.

                A middle node lets people access hidden services provided anonymously.

                 

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                John Fenderson (profile), May 1st, 2012 @ 9:32am

                Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: It's finally time

                Yes, I certainly would. And will.

                 

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            Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:17am

            Re: Re: Re: Re: It's finally time

            Yeah, because the only reason someone would want their privacy respected is to hide illegal activity. I guess the founders were a bunch of criminals.

             

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      Alexander, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:08pm

      Re: It's finally time

      I'm pretty sure that the government has spots as Tor nodes. Just FYI

       

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      VA, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:16am

      Re: It's finally time

      TOR is indeed designed to help people under attack by their governments so that they can get word out to the rest of the world about lies and atrocities.
      But since it was designed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory it's not exactly a viable method to circumvent US spying.

       

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      Jazz, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:00am

      Re: It's finally time

      By using it for everyday use and logging into anything, you compromise the stability and security of the system.Thanks, genius.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:46pm

    Like I've said before, CISPA has become an election year ploy by house republicans to make senate democrats and Obama look bad and weak on cyber crime. It's no longer about cyber security, it's about winning the white house & more seats in congress in 6 months.

    Adding reasons like 'protecting children' for why the government can gather lots of data with no warrant isn't about protecting the kids, it's about claiming Obama and democrats are against protecting our kids.

    This bill is sadly looking more and more like the PATRIOT act to me. An unnecessary bill that violates Americans rights to privacy pushed through in the name of protecting America from someone evil.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:54pm

      Re:

      I mentioned this earlier, but most people seemed to gloss over it on another post:

      You may have yelled down SOPA, but you didn't get rid of reality. This bill (and others to come) will have the same effects, will do the same things, and will change the way you do things online in very basic ways.

      Because there is no "taking away youtube videos" angle to play on this one, there is little real outrage out there. Yes, Mike and a few of his friends are getting pissy, but the reality is that this law (or one similar to it) is pretty much a given considering the lawlessness of the online world.

      I think of this (and SOPA for that matter) as an attempt o go out and get rid of all the silly legal blinds and foxholes that have blocked successful prosecution online. Further, it does it in a very eloquent way, by completely bypassing the 4th amendment due to third party involvement.

      It's a very swift and very direct kick in the balls to all the people who thought they could hide by doing things "on the internet" instead of in person. Sorry, the time bell jsut rang, last call at the ok corral.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:19am

        Re: Re:

        Trampling on civil rights is eloquent?

        You've got some serious issues.

         

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        CISPA BOT, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:54am

        Re: Re:

        Sir, our AI has scanned all your comments, emails, pornography searches and related internet activity. You have scored low in Patriotism and far too high in independent thought, this flags you as a cyberthreat. Please open all doors and windows, lie on your stomach on the floor and prepare to be extracted for reeducation. I wouldn't tell anyone about this as they may get upset and say something cyberthreatning and have to join you at Camp USA.

        God Bless America, or else.

         

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          Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:02am

          Re: Re: Re:

          If you honestly think that is what is going to happen, then you really need to get some re-education yourself.

           

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        BeeAitch (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:43pm

        Re: Re:

        You spout this as if it's a good thing.

        Why do you hate freedom?

         

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      Chargone (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:31am

      Re:

      one of may reasons representative democracy (and particularly the American model) is a crap system.

      I'm STILL not convinced it's better than an updated feudal system... (please note: serfdom and feudalism are NOT the same thing.)

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:56pm

    reporter???? hahahahhahahahahhaha

     

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    lan, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 4:58pm

    these lawmakers have no right to limit our internet access. Congress is busy crafting at least 5 cybersecurity bills but only 1 jobs bill. That shows how little they care about the welfare of US citizens. These lawmakers, most of whom are not tech experts and don't really know how the internet actually works, is crafting legislation in an attempt to control the internet. Even Tim Berners-Lee, one of the creators of the internet, is against this bill.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:15pm

      Re:

      Even Tim Berners-Lee, one of the creators of the internet, is against this bill.

      Wow, that says it all. By the way, even Mike Masnick- the creator of Techdirt is against this bill.

       

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        chillinshillin, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 5:41am

        Re: Re:

        Al gore the creator of the internet is for this bill /s

        btw all conversations in all homes with children under 18 will now be listened to via your computers microphones by nsa to insure that all children are safe.

         

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:54pm

      Re:

      The internet was stolen from my idea. Instead of just 2 cans on that wire, I put 5. Damn thieves.

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:11pm

      Re:

      With all due respect to Sir Tim Berners-Lee, who is a very smart guy and has been on the right side of nearly all these issues, he did not invent the Internet. He invented the web. The Internet was already around for a long time before he came along, and while the web is certainly a big part of it, it's not the most important part: it just happens to be the part that most people see.

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Jun 21st, 2012 @ 4:37am

      Re:

      Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web, not the Internet.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:00pm

    Do these people even know what "representative" means?!

     

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    Christiano Lopes, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:03pm

    Not only the american rights. The entire Internet is threaten by this law. I'm brazilian and I know this law is made to likely KILL INTERNET.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 29th, 2012 @ 7:54pm

      Re:

      Unrelated to the topic, but how does being Brazilian correlate to knowing that "this law is made to likely KILL INTERNET"? Please elaborate.

       

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    Joe Helfrich, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:05pm

    "Protection of Children"

    The issue here is the "Protection of Children" clause in the amendment. With the elections approaching quickly, voting against that amendment would be twisted into "Your representative refused to prosecute child porn!!!elevenz!!111!!!" commercials.

    No one really wants to spend money trying to explain why that's not true, and with a promised veto from the White House, the Dem leadership probably did a quick count, wrangled enough members into voting no on the final bill to make sure that it would be short of the 2/3rds necessary for an override, and released everyone to vote how they liked (for their own protection) on the amendment, and the folks in the vulnerable seat to vote for the final bill.

    Now it gets kicked over to the Senate, which is slightly less vulnerable to this sort of election blackmail. If it doesn't die there, it gets vetoed, and not overridden.

    Sound and fury, signifying nothing.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:31pm

      Re: "Protection of Children"

      Funny thought:

      I honestly think that anyone coming out against porn will lose in a close race. It won't be covered on the news. It won't be on polls because people won't want to admit to it.

      However... there is obviously a massive demand for porn in the United States. If there wasn't, there wouldn't be so much porn directed at us. I think it would be one of those "silent majority" losses that no one wants to admit to and few people see coming.

       

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      Joe, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:34am

      Re: "Protection of Children"

      Obviously, the situation in America has become so bad, that parents are unable to raise their children properly.

      I think the solution for this is for all American parents to take their (Sugar pre-loaded) children to the Whitehouse (or some Govt facility), wearing "My parents can't raise me, so the Govt will" T-Shirts, and leave them at the security office/reception/loading dock.
      On the plus side, the parents can have a child-free day, while the kids run amok!!
      :D

       

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    Luke, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:06pm

    That's it, i'm un-plugging the modem, somebody send a horse when it's safe again

     

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    RobShaver (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:19pm

    To paraphrase Ross Perot ...

    "That sucking sound you hear is our human/constitutional rights getting drained away by the people YOU put in office."

    I don't hear much talk in these pages about the NDAA that Obama already signed which effectively repealed the Habeas Corpus Act. (Read The NDAA: a clear and present danger to American liberty in The Guardian where it says The US is sleepwalking into becoming a police state, where, like a pre-Magna Carta monarch, the president can lock up anyone)

    Now CISPA is pushed through is another nail in our coffin.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Jun 21st, 2012 @ 4:42am

      Re: To paraphrase Ross Perot ...

      "That sucking sound you hear is our human/constitutional rights getting drained away by the people YOU put in office."

      Indeed. It's time to STOP voting, folks. Seriously.

       

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    BlueBaron, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:24pm

    Bad, but not the worst

    While this is bad, the Senate still needs to vote, and the possibility of veto still exists (though no precise word from the administration on this). They're shy of the 2/3 majority, the Constitutionality of CISPA can still be debated, and the law can barely be enforced without turning the nation into a huge oppressive machine like China or North Korea (and if that happens, simple Internet revolt probably won't be enough). Give it time, there's a large chance reason will overcome idiocy.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:34pm

      Re: Bad, but not the worst

      You (and others) fail to understand the dynamics of overcoming a veto. Once a bill is vetoed, the underlying merits go out of the window and it is all partisan politics. But first you have to get to the veto stage. In order for that to happen, the President would have to be totally immune to threats to stall legislation that's important to him. He has to be willing to wage war long before it gets to the veto stage. In an election year, that is a very dangerous fight for the incumbent administration to take on. Particularly when the issue is "cybercrime" and murky threats that are poorly understood. The anti-SOPA forces won because they were able to engage in bumper sticker politics. Their message was distilled into a few words. In this case the legislators fighting "cybercrime", 'foreign hackers" and "protecting children" have the bumper stickers. The other side has a much more involved, detailed and nuanced case to build. Guess what? The American electorate is a mile wide and an inch deep. Few people think beyond the slogan. Obama's best hope is that the final bill won't hit his desk before November. And then he'll sign it.

      I fully expect the douchebags of Anonymous to step in shit by taking down Congressional websites and the like making passage even easier.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:28pm

        Re: Re: Bad, but not the worst

        What Anonymous is doing is a protest - sorta like an internet version of a 60's "sit in". The folks who giggle about "not understanding the net" don't realize the home page is more like a poster and no real harm has been done.

        That's also the point. Most of Congress still think it's cute to "not understand" the net when they've had over 20 years to figure out it's not cute anymore. They are not the ones writting these bills. Private corporations are. That's a gimme for abuse right from the gate.

        Back in 2003 some wireless providers were caught editing and not forwarding texts that were critical of going to war. Now that's legal. How can the US support or criticize other governments that do that and turn around to impliment the same?

         

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:04pm

        Re: Re: Bad, but not the worst

        Convincing argument coming from Mr. "reporter???? hahahahhahahahahhaha".

         

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      Christopher, Apr 17th, 2013 @ 9:01pm

      Re: Bad, but not the worst

      According to the first half of the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence, a document by which it's writers and signers ideals are the foundation on which the country was built, "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness." So, basically saying, if the government starts to get out of hand, we, the people, have the right to overthrow the government.

      The genius of the constitution is that it can be changed, however, depending on what changes the government allows, this could also be it's biggest flaw.

      The constitution, in it's current state, allows the supreme court to stop a bill in its tracks if deemed unconstitutional. And according to the bill or rights, Mainly the 4th amendment, CISPA is unconstitutional. And even if it wasn't, America does not own the internet, and therefore has no right, whatsoever, to regulate it.

      You know your country is falling apart, when the elected officials are dumber than it's overall population...

       

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    That Anonymous Coward (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:24pm

    Protect the Children.

    As the policies and actions of Congress members could harm children, born and unborn, the best use of this is to open up all communications they have.
    While they seem to think the people are the problem, I think the bigger threat is bills being passed or amended that allow Corporations to do things that could have adverse effects on children.
    I think it is high time we remind them they are still just regular citizens and it is their duty to support this new overreaching legislation. I can think of nothing better coming out of it than to know who is offering who money to vote certain ways, who is making investments with insider information, who is voting to secure a position after they leave office.

    I am think of no nobler purpose for them in office than to become 100% transparent in everything they do, say, and think. Just think of all the crime we could prevent, and how much more secure we would be when these leaders know every thought they have is immediately viewable by average people.

     

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    Capt ICE Enforcer, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:25pm

    Governmental access

    Do not fear my friends. The US government will soon install a back door into all electronic devices for your protection. And to reduce the overhead from private companies to hand over the data. Reducing taxes and increasing production.

    Plan of action:

    1) All cell phones will transmit all communications, text messages, location data, and randomly send pictures and video to ensure you are safe from terrorist.

    2) All computers will automatically route information to government systems first. This ensures that malware is not on your system. Just like EA did with Battlefield 3

    3) Any device with a camera or audio will transmit data to the government without the user having to give consent or permission. This reduces the time individuals need to read stuff.

    4) The government is also authorized to add/remove files from any of your electronic devices at will. Doing this while you sleep ensures that your valuable time will not be wasted.

    * We promise to protect you from all the evils that you are not aware of. And will try really hard to protect everything about your personal life. And will not use this information to deny you medical coverage, insurance, or career employment. We will also try hard not to use this information for blackmail. We have submitted request to everyone on the planet to not hack our almost strong security system (70% of the time it works all the time) and gain complete access to everything about you and the millions of others in this country. We may use this information to assist in fabricating evidence to ensure the DJAZ.com, TVShack and MegaUpload individuals go to prison for ever and ever though they did nothing wrong. We also humbly request that foreign nations do not bring democracy to the USA as the USA had with other countries such as Iraq, and Afghanistan. Our spying on everything you do is much more high tech, so it cannot be wrong.

    Capt ICE Enforcer

     

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    CNYLiberty, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:31pm

    Feeding the new NSA Utah Datacenter

    Here's how this turns into a free pass for NSA wiretapping of all American internet communication:

    NSA Boss: We need to feed the new Utah datacenter. I want you to install a wiretap for all internet traffic through ISP X.

    NSA Lackey: National Security Letter?

    NSA Boss: No, there's political heat on us because some loose-lipped Senators mentioned the secret interpretation of the Patriot Act. Use CISPA instead. It's easier anyway.

    NSA Lackey: Okay. Will do. Heil USA!

    --

    NSA Lackey: Hey, you blueshirt! I need a word with you...

    Homeland Security Guy: You again?! What do you want this time?

    NSA Lackey: We have info about a cyberthreat involving ISP X. Contact them and let them know we need a wiretap installed on all their internet traffic.

    Homeland Security Guy: And what are you gonna do with all that traffic?

    NSA Lackey: None of your business! Just git r done like a good little cable guy, would ya'?

    --

    Homeland Security Guy: Hi.

    ISP X CEO: Hello. How can I help you today?

    Homeland Security Guy: We need to have some of our friends in black come and install a wiretap on all your internet traffic.

    ISP X CEO: Huh? What about all the trouble AT&T got into with their San Fran datacenter? What about wiretap law? I think I'll have to call my attorney first...

    Homeland Security Guy: No, you don't need to do that. It's because of a "cyberthreat". Did you hear that magic word I uttered. Let me say it again: "CYBERTHREAT". You are immune from any civil or criminal liability for cooperating.

    ISP X CEO: Oh. I see. But this will take some labor on our end. It's going to be expensive.

    Homeland Security Guy: We'll reimburse you at a very healthy rate.

    ISP X CEO: Oh, so we can make some money off of this too?

    Homeland Security Guy: You betcha! Do you agree to voluntarily cooperate then?

    ISP X CEO: Do we have a choice?

    Homeland Security Guy: Work with us, you get money and no liability. Refuse and you not only lose the money, but you might get the liability, and your company just might become a "cyberthreat" itself.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:02am

      Re: Feeding the new NSA Utah Datacenter

      Obviously anyone unwilling to cooperate with the governments requests is a cyberthreat and should be monitored until that can be proven.

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Jun 21st, 2012 @ 4:51am

      Re: Feeding the new NSA Utah Datacenter

      Sounds a lot like the way things in Utah have worked for at least the past 30 years (I've been trapped here almost 40, most unfortunately).

      I am absolutely certain that is where the Ministry of Love will be located.

       

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    A Guy (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:34pm

    Man, do we have to do the outrage thing again? I think I may be succumbing to outrage fatigue. Well, it's time to get myself psyched up for the fight in the senate I guess.

     

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    thedude, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:38pm

    CISPA discourages more arab springs

    The internet was making the poor and weak too powerful. So the rich had their lackeys in congress kill it.

     

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      EmberlyAwake, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:18pm

      Re: CISPA discourages more arab springs

      Yep! Thats exactly what Im thinking. Keep people disconnected from the world around them and from each other.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:43pm

    1984. Here we come to you 28 years late.

     

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    Robert Freetard, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:47pm

    The rollcall vote as recorded.

    http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2012/roll192.xml

    It's time to tell the people that voted for it that they wont be re-elected.

     

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      Watchit (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:55pm

      Re: The rollcall vote as recorded.

      thanks for the list :]

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:36pm

      Re: The rollcall vote as recorded.

      I think its worth saying that you'll be voting the other popular guy, that'll get them thinking, problem is, will the next guy be any better

       

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        Chargone (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:39am

        Re: Re: The rollcall vote as recorded.

        ... i'd say 'if they're both crap, run yourself'

        but the USA is an epic example of the fail that is the two party system... fairly substantial evidence that the entire point in political parties is to undermine the democratic functions of the system. proportional representation partially counter acts this, but has it's own issues.

         

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:38pm

      Re: The rollcall vote as recorded.

      Very revealing. So much for the idea that Republican's are for "lesser government" after this vote. I also noticed that Rep. Paul didn't vote at all.

       

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        Keii (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:36pm

        Re: Re: The rollcall vote as recorded.

        I do believe the only validity to what you said was this line here:
        "the reality is that this law (or one similar to it) is pretty much a given considering the lawlessness of the online world."
        Just not for the reason you say.
        The reality is that this law, or one similar to it, is pretty much a given because politicians/lobbyists don't quit. They never quit. If one thing is struct down they'll rewrite it in a different language and try again.
        I respect Ron Paul's oldness on not voting about that intertubes webinet thing.

         

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:39pm

      Re: The rollcall vote as recorded.

      And in case you don't know all your state's reps off the top of your head: http://www.house.gov/representatives/

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:05am

      Re: The rollcall vote as recorded.

      "Oh you will vote for the otherguy? HaHA piss of off fucker no one is running against me. By the way due to your opposition of the bill I have informed the NSA that you are probably a cyberthreat."

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:48pm

    I can't wait to start blocking all US traffic on my sites. It'll be a blast to see the people bitch.

    Haha.

     

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    Watchit (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:54pm

    I have some questions for those of you more knowledgeable in politics and law about the 2nd amendment passed.

    "2. Conyers (Ml): Would strike the exemption from criminal liability, strike the civil liability exemption for decisions made based upon cyber threat information identified, obtained, or shared under the bill, and ensure that those who negligently cause injury through the use of cyber security systems or the sharing of information are not exempt from potential civil liability."

    1. How far does this actually help?

    2. And what exactly does "negligently cause injury" actually mean?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 5:58pm

    The votes

    Didn't see the link above, so here's the vote details:

    http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2012/roll192.xml

    I'm proud to say my Republican rep was one of the few who voted NO on this bill... amazing. I'm glad I sent him a letter.

     

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    Brandy, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:01pm

    So the question everyone should be asking themselves is; what now? What will we do to stop this? Our freedoms seem to lessen more and more with time. When is enough going to be enough?

     

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    Bob, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:10pm

    hmm

    Well ok then. > Neighbors wireless/free wireless is going to be used alot more. Mac Change and proxies will actually be used by the tech not so kiddies so good fucking luck with that. Land of the free ! and home of the oh fuck it land of the rich and home of the poor.

     

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    CNYLiberty, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:12pm

    Will There Be A "Secret Interpretation" Too?

    Do you think the Department of Justice has started work on its secret interpretation of this Act? Or do they wait until it is actually made law?

    Personally, I think the vagueness of the terms in the Act is intentional, best to facilitate a secret interpretation.

     

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    robob, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:30pm

    apparently 60-40 is near unanimous. way to fear monger, you are no different then the mainstream media that fear monger the masses into giving up our liberties.

    Even more astonishingly, it passed with a near-unanimous vote

     

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      Leigh Beadon (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:43pm

      Re:

      apparently 60-40 is near unanimous. way to fear monger, you are no different then the mainstream media that fear monger the masses into giving up our liberties.

      Perhaps this is not quite clear, but the "near-unanimous" part is about the amendment that was voted on before the bill - and that was indeed a near-unanimous vote (i forget the count now but it was around 400 in favour)

       

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    Blur4449 (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:44pm

    Just told my congress critter

    I just told my congress critter he's fired for passing this bill and that he'll be out on the street since it is an election year. Hope he enjoys dealing with being unemployed like the rest of the 99%.

     

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      Cowardly Anonymous, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:41pm

      Re: Just told my congress critter

      Same, just have to broadcast to friends and family now. If we can raise a big enough stink, the Senate will kill it to avoid the same treatment.

       

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:58pm

      Re: Just told my congress critter

      Like they will care? Their income is guaranteed for life. Last I'd heard it was $174k/year? Plus retirement benefits after 5 years in office.

       

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    JR, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:46pm

    Stop acting surprised. People are paying good money to take control of the internet, and our representatives are making bank on voting the "right" way. Everything is going exactly as intended (for those in power).

     

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    Digital, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:54pm

    Alpha Centauri

    "As the Americans learned so painfully in Earth's final century, free flow of information is the only safeguard against tyranny. The once-chained people whose leaders at last lose their grip on information flow will soon burst with freedom and vitality, but the free nation gradually constricting its grip on public discourse has begun its rapid slide into despotism. Beware of he who would deny you access to information, for in his heart he dreams himself your master."
    -- Commissioner Pravin Lal, "U.N. Declaration of Rights"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iY57ErBkFFE

     

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    Pay attention, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:56pm

    Can everyone stop with the "oh I'm going to vote X out of office, he'll be sorry!"
    a) The powers that be (and their software) count the votes, not you.
    b) More importantly:

    1) Company A writes law that benefits them.
    2) Company A pays congresscritter to vote for law.
    3) You write congresscritter a letter opposing the law.
    4) Congresscritters' staff member gives him a summary: "A bunch of people sent letters opposing this law." Congresscritter shrugs, as this is not relevant to him.
    5) Congresscritter votes the way company A told him to.
    6) Congresscritter is now rich and happy. His family is going to have a bigger house. His children will go to fancy colleges.
    7) You cast your vote against the congresscritter next time you're asked.
    7a) Computer ignores your vote?
    7b) Computer counts your vote?
    Doesn't matter, because:
    8) Congresscritter now gets a cushy job at Company A. He is further secured in the top 1% of the population.

    Explain to me why congresscritter will give a damn about your letter, phone call or vote?

    People need to learn to do a lot more than vote. Recognize when a system is deliberately oppressing you. Don't be a sucker by following the rules set up by the same oppressor.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:44pm

      Re:

      RIGHT ON!!! Open public votes or GTFO

       

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      Cowardly Anonymous, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:57pm

      Re:

      Congress Critters don't move as fast as the Internet. It takes them a little while to get into the committees (which is where most of the money and job offers are targeted). Kick them out every time they ignore the people and you'll cause some shuffling in the system. During that shuffling, there is a chance to strike deeper.

      Civil-disobedience won't work any better if the Politician's are beyond the reach of the vote, though it is quite useful while they can be influenced. Granted, in this case, route-around is the best you can do.

      Riots and revolution, well, I'd like to avoid the bloodshed if at all possible.


      Another tactic we can try: contact other countries diplomats. You know, countries that still have an ounce of morals but fear the US not liking them. Send them petitions, from the American public, that they can throw in our diplomats faces. Get other countries to pressure the US for a change.


      A third tactic: Boycott any company that doesn't explicitly forfeit the immunity granted by CISPA in their privacy policy (yes, I know, hardest of the three).

       

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      EmberlyAwake, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:37pm

      Response to: Pay attention on Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:56pm

      Indeed. We are wayyyyy beyond the point where we can take back our country using this system. Now we find out if our land of the free and home of the Brave have the guts to do what it takes when the time comes. That time is Dawning. We've deluded ourselves and buried our heads in the sand here at home and have shamed ourselves abroad! Its heart breaking because I love our country! Its time to Wake Up people!!! What are we gonna DO???

       

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      jj, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 3:13pm

      Response to: Pay attention on Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:56pm

      *silently dusts off and relaces his old combat boots and sees if they still fit...they do.

      Ok, I'm ready when u guys r.

       

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    jabberwookie, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 6:58pm

    pedos the new jews

    If you were ever wondering how Jews ended up cooking in ovens, how a gradual but efficient erosion of rights of a minority were established, how fellow citizens sat aside without getting alarmed, you need only look at how pedophiles have been cordoned off into a special class of people undeserving of legal protection.

    > 3) protection of individuals from the danger
    > of death or physical injury; 4) protection of
    > minors from physical or psychological harm;

    Note the lack of reference to any criminal activity, and the radical lowering of the bar to "psychological harm."

    This law will enable anybody at any computer network decide to hand over information voluntarily on the activity of a so-called pedophile, whether that activity is illegal or not. It is an attack on political speech, on the right to assembly.

    Pedophiles had better flee the country. There is no time left. Reason will not prevail.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:01pm

    umm

    i wonder how many comments are from fake online profiles created by the usaf

     

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    Andrew S. (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:10pm

    This STILL doesn't violate the 4th amendment

    This is just another illustration of how behind in technology the law is.

    Under the third party doctrine, any information exposed to third parties is not subject to 4th amendment protection. Basically, the Supreme Court held that the government did not need a warrant to obtain the phone numbers people dialed, because they had to reveal the phone number to the phone company.

    That has evolved into, the 4th amendment does not protect any information you put online (including email), because you expose it to your ISP or other service providers.


    Kagan indicated she'd be willing to scrap that rule in her recent concurrence in the GPS tracking case, however, it hasn't happened yet. Until it does, this bill is entirely constitutional...

     

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      Cowardly Anonymous, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:10pm

      Re: This STILL doesn't violate the 4th amendment

      True, but this bill allows for all internet communications to be handed over, by your ISP. You haven't actually released this information to the ISP, as they function as couriers. Mail that is not crossing the border is the standard from which the inclusion of papers in the amendment is derives.

      Obtaining the number dialed is a far cry from obtaining a sound recording of your call, which does require a warrant. Similarly, all data below that IP header has not been released to the ISP. The government can already obtain IP addresses (though private entities must go through the courts). The information shared under CISPA is far, far broader.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:53pm

        Re: Re: This STILL doesn't violate the 4th amendment

        "You haven't actually released this information to the ISP, as they function as couriers. Mail that is not crossing the border is the standard from which the inclusion of papers in the amendment is derives."

        Hmmm. So maybe this is the reason Congress wants to destroy snail mail?

         

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    SHOWA, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:11pm

    If you don't do illegal things online then one shouldn't worry about this.

    Incompetent net criminals that can't cover their tracks deserve to suffer greatly under this just for being typical sleaze I'd keep my children fro.

     

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      Cowardly Anonymous, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:14pm

      Re:

      I suppose you also think you should talk to the police?

      I will talk to them under three conditions:

      a) I called them
      b) They have a warrant
      c) I have a judge signed and lawyer approved paper declaring my immunity in all matters discussed sitting on the table in front of me

       

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      Patrick (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:31pm

      Re:

      This is about CISPA being broadly interpreted to allow the government to declare ANYONE a criminal. We are not criminals protesting a government who can now catch us red handed. We are AMERICAN CITIZENS fed up with a government that has the power to declare law abiding citizens criminals. That should worry you. That should anger you.

       

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      brandy, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:04am

      Re:

      If your not doing anything illegal at home then you wouldn't mind the fbi or homeland security placing a few agents in your house to "keep you safe"

       

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      Snuffy, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:06pm

      Re: Showa

      Right. If you've done nothing wrong, you have nothing to fear. As long as you have absolute trust in the integrity, and competency, of the government. I have neither. And what happens to our economy when the clumsy idiots destroy the trust that makes internet business possible? These guys (congress) brag about their ignorance of how the internet works, but have the temerity to make rules about it's use?

       

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    Jeffrey Henderson, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:16pm

    This doesn't end the 4th Amendment

    Basically this means CISPA can no longer be called a cybersecurity bill at all. The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a "cybersecurity crime". Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all.


    No one can say the 4th Amendment doesn't apply online. If this passes the Senate and is signed into law as is then it will surely be challenged in the courts and should be overturned and blatantly unconstitutional.

    That said this is completely ridiculous and yet another sign that our govt doesn't work for us at all. Anyone who still believes that is delusional.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:51pm

      Re: This doesn't end the 4th Amendment

      You are wrong. Read response #103 from Andrew S.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:04am

        Re: Re: This doesn't end the 4th Amendment

        And read the responses after. Besides with, we do have our 2nd Amendment, and I gotta tell ya... If the system breaks down I've got 2 months to live without guaranteed medical treatments every other day. If I'm going out, I'm going to spend my time helping ensure that my nephews enjoy the freedoms that we were guaranteed over two centuries ago.

         

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    Nicholas, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:30pm

    You boys and girls in the US need to make a decision quick. The rest of the world looks to you as leaders and we're really worried.

     

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    vlad, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:31pm

    So basically now we will all have to pay for a private VPN as well as general internet connection, encrypt any communication whatsoever between devices outside our private network, and worry about any button we click or action we take through an unsecured connection or via social networking sites.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:49pm

      Re:

      Welcome to the internet

      Good write up on one consequences of all these actions

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:12pm

        Re: Re:

        I feel that way now, wondering what a site may or may not be set up to do with your info, but at least back then they didn't have laws to encourage and expand these despicable methods.......its our fckin information ffs.........shall i start forwarding my mail to the nearest government body, should i call my local governing body and arrange a time thats convenient for me for them to fix my phones wiretap, should I teach my grandchildren that its illegal to block internet capable cameras, because of our safety.

        Now some of you are thinking unlikely, others will argue the fact purely because they can't stand an opposing opinion to their own, which I encourage to be honest, one day im sure they'll be fighting for a noble cause, but in my eyes, that's the kind of world that i see SNEAKING upon us all

         

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    Doug Jones, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:51pm

    248 congress droids

    ...need to be voted out of office. One can dream, anyway.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 7:52pm

    It still needs to go through the Senate and Obama. Nothing to fear.

     

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    Patrick (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:19pm

    And what happens when TOR becomes a "cyberthreat"?

     

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    Sad, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:31pm

    Let's see if any one in government will fight for what the people deserve!
    Next Poll date is the end of July!!

     

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    Patrick (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:34pm

    Re:

    This is about CISPA being broadly interpreted to allow the government to declare ANYONE a criminal. We are not criminals protesting a government who can now catch us red handed. We are AMERICAN CITIZENS fed up with a government that has the power to declare law abiding citizens criminals. That should worry you. That should anger you.

     

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    Chris Tenney, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:35pm

    Glory to freedom

    Lousy Collectivist filth, how DARE they try to oppress us, Obama had damn well better veto this act of treason, or things'll get VERY ugly. >:(

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:31pm

      Re: Glory to freedom

      Watch outm that could get turned around on you as evidence (i just watched the "dont talk to the police" video) and im.probably now a suspect because ive replied to your comment.

      We do need to protest this, but we should do so nonviolently. At least, while thats still legal/

       

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    James, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 8:55pm

    i might just delete all my emails and everything like it i already have enough privacy issues and to make it worse i already got in trouble for something i did not even do. it was something on my twitter account thing is i have never had a twitter well so far its goodbye internet i hate anything that invades privacy

     

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    das klub, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:03pm

    Americans have become the monster

    In attempt to fight evil, we have become it. There was a time when people fled their country because of religious persecution, perhaps there will one day be a time people flee their country for a new problem: big brother.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:16am

      Re: Americans have become the monster

      And where do they go? Name one place that has the opportunity and freedoms that are comparible. Canada? Close. Australia? Close, but again they don't want to piss off the US. No real gun rights. That's a deal breaker for me.

      I'd rather stay and fight. I'm not giving this country up to a bunch of cowards and marxist die-hards.

       

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    ThumbsUpThumbsDown (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:39pm

    Worst possible CISPA, best possible invitation for CISPA takedown

    They insist. It's their road or the Highway.

    They think three hundred million Americans can be served whatever rancid, even toxic, borsht comes off the legislative menu without consequenses: It's PIPA one week; SOPA the next; ACTA, for breakfast and lunch the following month; and, for supper a year later, you too can look forward to washing down the past years gastronomic nightmare from our American Congress with the delightfully fecal aroma of CISPA in the air.

    In a sense, it's good that with this latest passed version of CISPA, these Legislators have come out of the closet and told us more clearly than ever EXACTLY what the THINK.

    More of the sleeping American Democracy Should hear and begin to REALLY understand their message. Only then will the REAL power behind three hundred million voices be heard. Perhaps then the legislatures will be cleaned out from floor to ceiling in both houses; down to the skanky fleas and ticks and lice the live their; washed down in every nook and crany with disinfectant; and a new generation of leaders invited in who have been born again to the REAL meaning of the American Constitution.

     

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      Meat, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:22pm

      Re: Worst possible CISPA, best possible invitation for CISPA takedown

      What bus did you just climb off of? You are big_ dreaming of another place, maybe in Rigel system or Tarantula Nebula, some solar system out there, somewhere, but unfortunately, not earth.. >:-D

       

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    Non-American-Citizen, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:41pm

    CISPA is great ....

    .... because it gives you (the American Citizen) the same shitty treatment the rest of the world (the Others) get since ever.
    You never cared about the Others, now you are the Others, too.

     

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      The Moondoggie, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:25pm

      Re: CISPA is great ....but

      No I think this is worse than how U.S. treats the world: basically all the government needs to do is point a finger on any guy with a computer and yell "CRIMINAL"!

      And with the world imitating the U.S., I will bet $10 this type of law will b passed elsewhere, the world will still get the shorter end of the stick.

       

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      metalgoddess (profile), Apr 30th, 2012 @ 11:36pm

      Re: CISPA is great ....

      We are most certainly getting a good taste of our own medicine. While we blindly sat there pointing fingers at other countries for doing this sort of thing, our political leadership was working quietly behind the scenes to impose the exact same thing on us while warning us that this was going on in other countries. U.S. politicians have been droning on and on about how China censors the Internet. Well guess what, they're going to look like choirboys next to our government.

       

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    Krelboid, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:42pm

    Now, Now

    Our government is only fulfilling its responsibilities to its owners. Those For-profit Prisons aren't going to fill themselves you know.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 9:49pm

    Time for me to cross the border into Mexico. At least there the US government has to drive to arrest me.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:07pm

    Well Shit

    Hope you guys are ready for a global change that can be classified as the end of the world because it is coming 2012/12/21.

     

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    Gator, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:16pm

    Question

    Obviously I'm pro-privacy and anti-orwellian police state.......but how do privacy rights apply to voluntarily, publicly "shared information"? Are they going to be reading my e-mail, or reading the shit I post on forums and facebook? Because I don't see the latter as any different from writing something down and nailing it to a public wall. The only difference is it's in fact way MORE public than that would be, and thus I'm more liable for it.

    I usually have kneejerk reactions of opposition to this stuff, but I'm starting to look more critically at things. Trying not to blindly believe whatever someone says on a status update.

     

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    Moo, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:16pm

    Explain, please?

    Can someone please explain what this actually means? The article starts out saying the bill was passed, but in the closing paragraph it sounds like it didn't...? Is it a done deal or not?

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:11am

      Re: Explain, please?

      A bill needs to go through the House and Senate and then the president has the chance to veto. This has made it through the house but still has a ways to go to become law.

       

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    unknown, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:20pm

    GUN

    There has been a lot of talk of 4th amendment rights, if this goes through I might have to take up my 2nd amendment rights

     

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    Activist, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:26pm

    List of who voted for CISPA

    Final vote: http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2012/roll192.xml

    Check to see if your congressman voted for CISPA (HR3523). If they did, vote against them in the coming elections. Also, look up other parts of their record, and use that information to help convince others to vote against them. Examples include NDAA (National Defense Authorization Act of 2012), the cosponsors of PCIPA (HR 1981): http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d112:HR01981:@@@P , those who voted for HR 347 http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d112:h.r.00347: , and the cosponsors of the Stop Online Piracy Act (HR 3261): http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d112:h.r.03261:

    The congressional and Presidential Primary in Texas is May 29th. Michael McCaul [R-TX 10th District] voted for CISPA. Vote against him in the primary!

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:36pm

    Fuck this noise

     

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    That One Guy (profile), Apr 26th, 2012 @ 10:54pm

    I'm going to be laughing my ass off if the public makes a big enough stink about this, Obama actually vetoes the thing, it doesn't get enough votes to override the veto, and the whole thing backfires on the people who are trying to pass it.

    Instead of the republicans being able to hold it up as them 'doing something to protect the internet, and children, and puppies', all the while painting Obama as a terrorist for trying to shut it down(and thereby weaken the internet of course), at that point the democrats would have a pretty easy time of painting Obama as a champion for the internet(whether or not it's true), which would be a massive boost to his reputation for the election.

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:26pm

      Re:

      Will you still be laughing your ass off after it passes? There were enough positive votes already to override the veto, so there is little chance that Obama can stand in the way for more than a few minutes.

      I would say you might want to control your laughter until the whole thing plays out. There isn't anywhere near the backlash on this one compared to SOPA.

       

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:11am

        Re: Re:

        There were not enough votes to override the veto. You need 2/3rds majority, and this fell around 60%, not 66%. Still, not laughing. VERY pissed.

         

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        That One Guy (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:04pm

        Re: Re:

        Well in that case it'll move onto 'pissed off and slamming head into wall'.

        I wouldn't count the backlash out quite yet though, once this little tid-bit gains enough steam online and really starts getting noticed, I imagine it'll be enough to make the SOPA blowup look mild in comparison.

         

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:32pm

    This will forever continue in its downward spiral, unless we get rid of the monetary system; strive for efficiency and sustainability. We're all human and we need to act as one. Not this territorial cave man shit.

     

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    Martin, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:32pm

    Land of the oppressed and ( This person has been censored because he is treated as a potential terrorist threat. Contact CISPA Agency for further information. Signed by Government, your nanny).

     

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    TerraHertz, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:33pm

    Just keep running in circles of denial

    It amazes me. Each year this bs gets worse. Long ago it stopped being even funny, and at least a few years ago it became clearly a matter of survival of civilization.

    Yet still everyone runs around talking, talking, talking.

    Hey! The Criminal Elite Ziombies are breaking down the last barriers. Don't you see it?

    It's shotguns or nothing, now. The only way to defeat zombies is to blow their heads off. Talking DOES NOT WORK.

     

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    JRB mad man plan, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:41pm

    Well ladies and gents, I gurantee soon to come will be laws constricting "what" a terrorist actually is. More than likely leading to us all being marked as a threat if we appose outlandish corrupted bullshit like this! My point may be smudged but in short, we the people of the United States. NO. The world need fight the overbearing governments of this twisted world! Because soon we will be their puppets and dance we shall as they dine upon fine wines and we squeal as swines!
    REBEL TODAY LEAD TOMORROWS

     

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    Pi, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:49pm

    Fuuuuck their mothers!!!!!


    No ones gonna stop me from d

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 26th, 2012 @ 11:52pm

    A new law has passed, you say?

    Well I didn't vote for this!

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:13am

      Re:

      No, that isn't what was said. A bill was passed in the House, not the House and the Senate and signed by Blowbama.

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:58am

    Tor

    "But since it was designed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory it's not exactly a viable method to circumvent US spying."

    This is a claim often made, but it isn't true. The Tor Project is not a part of the US government, and Tor is opensource. If there had been any backdoor, it would surely have been discovered.

    And no Tor is not just for "criminals" with something to hide. Law enforcement, political dissidents and whistleblowers even in civilized nations use Tor.

     

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    drew (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:40am

    So here's a suggestion

    They want to know everything that you do online right? So organise a day (sometime soon, ideally with a bit of national significance) and on that day copy your congressman / senator into every e-mail you send and every online post you make.
    They want to know, so tell them, see how long they still want to know for...

     

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      The Moondoggie, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:07am

      Re: So here's a suggestion

      LOL Like what they did in Canada?

      So like everytime I post images on /a/, /b/ and /h/, everytime I send emails, everytime I actually do something on the net? Like that?

      I'm game!

       

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:28am

    Democracy Now has been covering this; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxu7VZRAYOY
    Full coverage on thier website. It's actually pretty insightful.

     

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    Pgriffy, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:44am

    What do you expect?

    Maybe you are being too harsh on Rep Quyale, after all, he grew up in a home that can't even spell potatoE. You'd be a bit messed up too if Dan were your Pop.

     

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    donewithtech, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:47am

    that's it, I am outta here

    I am literally selling all my computer equipment, dumping my smartphone, and getting totally off the internet. It should have been the obvious conclusion from something created by DARPA...

     

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    Devils Principle, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:55am

    Fools

    I just voted in my state's primary, Tuesday. I voted against every incumbent. I will do it again for the same reasons that bills like this pass the House. I am definitely voting against the incumbent, Charlie Dent here in PA~15 and will encourage others to do so.

    F this country. We have a~holes making incedibly stupid laws.

     

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    Zack Karpel (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:56am

    oh come the f on!

    if the president does not veto this he risks the entire country rioting when they find out.

     

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    Mega1987 (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:30am

    well....
    They just proved that they'll do anything... event bend their own constitutions for their own needs...

    I feel sorry for the Americans who will suffer from this action...
    Their rights to privacy in their own computers just got vaporized....

     

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      Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:33am

      Re:

      How many years until a bill is passed that would allow them to move their surveilance from online to your local computer...anyone?

       

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        anonymous, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:39am

        Re: Re:

        If that happens, disable Windows Update.

         

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        Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:15am

        Re: Re:

        Well if your local computer is hooked up the internet then it is technically online. So with the way our federal law enforcement agencies read bills I would have to guess about 1 day.

         

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    anonymous, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:32am

    About tor...

    You guys do know that there's something about a million times safer that Tor, and it works a lot faster. http://www.ultrasurf.us

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:39am

    We replaces the bill with a Playboy. Let's see if they notice.

     

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    racehwl, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:59am

    We need RON PAUL! he would have put a stop to this BULLCheese!

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 5:01am

    ODUMBA WILL VETO IT AND LOOK LIKE A HERO FOR YOUR VOTES!!! I BET YOU! YOU JUST WATCH! THIS IS ANOTHER SET UP JUST LIKE SOUP!

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 5:39am

    someone please explain to me why it is that politicians who are supposed to be working, first and foremost, for the citizens of their respective country, so frequently ignore those citizens and do whatever it is they feel like, regardless of the adverse impact the decision will have? i understand that citizens have entrusted those politicians to act for them, but when they do the opposite of what is wanted, why is their no immediate recourse able to be taken? having to wait for 3 years, sometimes more, is pretty ridiculous!

     

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    Kromn, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 5:59am

    Well, this is how the government and the corperations that power it can abuse their authority, they have just ok'd something in the e-world that is illegal in the mundane world, identity theft, and the opening of mail not of your property. I thought these were federal crimes, however if the feds are comitting it, I guess it is a federal crime.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:01am

    Where are all the internet companies now. Oh right, they love this.
    Guess it's time we secure our shit, hunker down for the CISPA winter, and wait till hollywood collapses.

     

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    Matthew (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:29am

    Motherfuckers

    Congratulations "Aye" voters - you just got on my "do not re-elect" list! You've joined the illustrious ranks of unrepentant SOPA and PIPA supporters. I want Obama to veto this piece of shit legislation, but your opponent in your next election just got my vote no matter what else happens.

    http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2012/roll192.xml

     

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    Thomas, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:33am

    Yeah, right

    Obama promised to veto NDAA as well...some folks are just suckers...

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:34am

    Obama will sign this because congress is deliberately lying to our faces. They will string out this whole it now protects privacy doublespeak, and the dumb media will run with it then the dumb americans will be like wow, this protects us! so of course Obama will not veto it.

     

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    TDR, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:14am

    Suddenly I'm hearing the Imperial March - the USA's new national anthem. Cue the Star Destroyers - er, battleships - and the stormtroopers - er, Marines!

    Perhaps we should start writing our comments and emails in Pig Latin. Maybe if a lot of people do it, it would give the snoops a big huh? moment when they see it all over the place.

    It'say imetay orfay usay otay outeray astpay esethay illsbay, incesay echtay isay alwaysay asterfay anthay awlay. Ethay etnay illway eesay isthay illbay asay amageday anday outeray arounday itay. Imetay orfay anotheray etnay ackoutblay! Amenay!

    Anday obbay isay egacylay ediamay illshay., asay eway allay owknay.

    And that's just normal Pig Latin. We could always come up variations, too, to keep them guessing and make the words less obvious.

     

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    Ashyballs, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:24am

    I'm gonna dumb this down....

    This isn't about amendments, security, the children, or any of the other bullshit reasons people think this is a good or bad idea. Botton line: The government has no business getting into my business. You open this floodgate, and then what? Where is the line? Protect my right to freedom, liberty, and the persuit of happiness, protect the borders of this country, and abide by the constitution. Period. End of story. Leave the rest to the states and the people. Jesus Christ. It isn't rocket science.

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:36am

    There is a legal remedy

    This is exactly the type of situation the U.S. second amendment was written for.

     

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    Jarl, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:39am

    What can you say

    Guttered, but now we all need to try harder to get around.. That's the way it's done..

     

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    D., Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:00am

    I don't wanna be Hindsight-man, but that's what you get when you let other people decide for you. Direct democracy is the only democracy.

    When a law is in the making, every person it applies to should have the right to vote on it (and of course that vote has to be taken into account significantly). That's what freedom and democracy are.

     

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    Thomas (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:17am

    Amazing..

    The House just repealed the 4th amendment. I thought that would require consent of 2/3 majority of the state legislatures.

    Himmler and Beria would really be proud of the House of Representatives.

    The SCOTUS will definitely approve it - there will be some nice fat gifts involved. Wonder how much you have to pay to get a favorable decision from SCOTUS? Cash? Drugs? Hookers? Offshore real estate? Stock?

     

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    Philly Bob (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:40am

    Baloney...

    The government's way of over-reacting.
    If one person does something, they ban it across the board.
    If you hit your head, the world has to wear hard hats from now on. Drop something on your foot? Steel toed boots for everyone.

    Also...

    Three of the biggest catch phrases of the year:

    It's to "Protect The Children". If you are against the bill, you are against the children and you are against America, which makes you a terrorist.

    It's "for the troops." If you are against the bill, you are against our troops and you are against America, which makes you a terrorist.

    It's "for your protection". WOW! I didn't know that after 53 years I wasn't capable of protecting myself! But I need the government to protect me from becoming a terrorist!

    Suddenly, everyone is a criminal, a terrorist and a child molester. When did this happen?

     

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      Maybe, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 9:18am

      Re: Baloney...

      If everyone commits suicide, they will only be able to rule themselves and they will say, "Man, these laws suck.. I'm not going to obey that one.. Lets change this back. Oh wait, we don't have to abide by these.. what was I thinking?"

      "I'll have the Charred Ostrich with deep potato shoots and a glass of the methane water."

       

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    Peter Sherinian, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:47am

    cispa bill

    Why? Why is yhe congress considering bills like this and why is the administration advancing bills like this? What is their modus- operanda for doing this? Also are they even asking the voters the people of this country if we want laws like this? I don't think so. This along wiTh The resT of The bills ThaT have been inTroduced in signed, along wiTh execuTive orders, need to be rescinded.

     

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      Why?, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 9:00am

      Re: cispa bill

      They are wrapping things up before the oil runs out, the ionosphere opens up, the magnetosphere flip-flops, solar storms melt us, All the enemies of earth clash, scorched land will be the new law of the land. But, not to panic.. Many have gone before us. More will follow.

       

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    Peter Sherinian, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:47am

    cispa bill

    Why? Why is yhe congress considering bills like this and why is the administration advancing bills like this? What is their modus- operanda for doing this? Also are they even asking the voters the people of this country if we want laws like this? I don't think so. This along wiTh The resT of The bills ThaT have been inTroduced in signed, along wiTh execuTive orders, need to be rescinded.

     

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    corwin155 (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 10:01am

    fascists

    i hear the corporate Jack boots marching already

     

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    Gossip_Grl, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 10:43am

    I say we Cispa them all out of office in November

     

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    J Ringer, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 10:59am

    Express your dissatisfaction

    Help make the social environment hostile to the people who do these sort of things by using this protest song project
    http://mycountrymyass.com

     

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    Justin, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 11:27am

    Also

    It's worth noting that this doesn't just involve your actions on a computer. This involves your actions WHICH ARE STORED ON ANY COMPUTER IN THE US.

    Almost everything you do is stored in a database somewhere by somebody. This gives the US Govt the ability to access all of that information *WITHOUT A WARRANT*. This is a massive dismantling of privacy in so many cases that do not involve your presence or activities online. As a society, we use our digital computing technology to aid in almost everything, and because of that, almost every action you take IN THE REAL WORLD will be visible to the government at any time for any reason if this bill passes.

    They will know:

    1. What you eat when you pay for dinner with your credit card.
    2. Where you are every time you make a non-cash transaction (or worse, even then with surveillance or any kind of "rewards" card you use)
    3. Every person you've ever called, for how long
    4. Every transaction you've ever made on your credit card
    5. What kind of lingerie, underwear, or other personal items you purchase.
    6. etc etc etc

    Fantastically useful information for a "cyber security" bill, am I right? "Privacy" is something that will no longer exist in this country if this bill isn't crushed in the senate. This is the worst bill I have ever seen proposed. It makes SOPA/PIPA look like a fucking joke.

     

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    KMU, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 11:53am

    RE:

    They will know:

    1. What you eat when you pay for dinner with your credit card.
    2. Where you are every time you make a non-cash transaction (or worse, even then with surveillance or any kind of "rewards" card you use)
    3. Every person you've ever called, for how long
    4. Every transaction you've ever made on your credit card
    5. What kind of lingerie, underwear, or other personal items you purchase.
    6. etc etc etc


    So what??

     

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      so what?, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:10pm

      Re: RE:

      can they just take you away first?

       

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      JonK (profile), May 1st, 2012 @ 7:45pm

      Re: RE:

      KMU:

      I guess you've never had someone elses garbage reported under your name. It is amazing how many organizations think that if you are John Smith, and somewhere somebody named John Smith broke a law it is your problem, and you should be in jail until it gets sorted out!

       

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    its official, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:07pm

    the US government is more of a threat to america then terrorism of all world powers combined.

     

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    red white and blue, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:07pm

    mad

    they are looking for anyone (us) that would stand up against this evil goverment. we will be the first detaned and forced to shut up so they can take control!

     

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    red white and blue, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:16pm

    if you are thout to be a risk ya. look up fdaa.

     

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    red white and blue, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:33pm

    why do you think they are passing bills like cispa ndaa ndrp and outhers that are a crime aganst our rights! hitler did the same thing! im from earth what is your prob wake up!

     

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    Darius, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:54pm

    We can sit around and talk about how aweful this billis, (and it is), or we can do something about it. If you are a US citizen, urge your senators to reject CISPA. You can send a letter here: https://act.demandprogress.org/act/cispa_passes/.

     

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      Meat, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:38pm

      Re:

      or we can do something about it. If you are a US citizen, urge your senators to reject CISPA

      If that is all we can do, urge, that is actually funny! Get it? I urge all of you.. do something about this bad, bad bill?

       

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    red white and blue, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 12:55pm

    i dont get it. i just want to live in a free country where we are not represd or spyd on by the gov! do you like how they run this country? i dont.

     

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    Overcast (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 1:26pm

    Well the representative for my district just lost my vote.

     

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    Josh Reed, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 2:00pm

    a 17 year olds view

    I belive that if the goverment was going to do what they say that they were going to do, it would be a good thing to pass. But I know how the goverment is and they are very sneaky people. They are going to spy on us, I know from personal experiance. So I really don't think this should be passed.

     

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    Mike Hunt, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 3:26pm

    CISPA

    To be perfectly honest....I'm glad it has passed.Why?Because the internet needs controlling.If the real world ran like the net it would be bedlam.For too long it has been the wild west and everyone just ran wild and stole goods and behaved like scumbag bits of shit.Well now your wild west is over and I am fucking glad.Boo hoo our rights,boo hoo..Fuck the lot of yer you crying,assholes.There Ive said it.Someone had to.

     

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      Snuffy, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:32pm

      Re: CISPA

      The real world and the net are now inseparable. If you effectively take down the internet, there will be an economic catastrophe that will dwarf the endless recession we're in now. And how secure will we be then, I wonder?

       

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    Crop/Gov = Idiots, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 4:45pm

    This sh*t is useless

    The end is near for these corporate demons, less than 15 years and they'll be a distant memory. All this CISPA crap is, is basically a "last-minute" struggle to survive the SMACK DOWN the Internet has placed on these demonic life-draining viruses. It's too little, too late, they had a good run being the feces of planet Earth, but it'll be over soon.

    A better metaphor is a drowning person, thrashing to stay afloat, but alas, they cant swim and will soon be dead.

    People will simply start to use encryption/stenography to do their daily tasks, like downloading terabytes "intellectual property" absolutely 100% free as always. This in fact, will ACCELERATE, and NOT be mitigated.. Not one bit, regardless of these demonic bills that get passed.

     

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      mike hunt, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 5:32pm

      Re: This sh*t is useless

      bollocks!!!!!!encryption will be banned and anyone using it will be fined big time.The net is over as you knew it.Maybe if thieving twats would have paid for stuff this would not be happening.Reap what you have sewn.I'm laughing at all this and I'm glad it's passed.About time someone took the net in hand.

       

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        Crop/Gov = Idiots, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 1:22am

        Re: Re: This sh*t is useless

        ENCRYPTION CAN *NEVER* BE "BANNED". WHAT ABOUT SSL? can SSL be "BANNED"? The answer is absolutely 100% NEVER. All banking and secure transactions RELY on it, Therefore, downloading will continue lovely, as usual.

        Try as they might, then cannot EVER stop us now, it's far too late for that. They will either have to RADICALLY change their business model, or be face obsolescence. Either way, their profits will diminish steadily as they have been for the last decade.

        The only THIEVES here are the corporations and anyone in their right mind (and who is not a shill for the gov/corp of course) knows that fact. And like I said even if ALL encryption were banned/blocked, then STENOGRAPHIC methods would take over as the next step and basically would be unstoppable. Even if the U.S. (where all the top nameservers are located) BLEW UP AND MELTED INTO THE OCEAN, the Internet would STILL survive as it was BUILT to do just that.

        It's over for them. Short of turning the internet into a digital NAZI GERMANY, "FREE STUFF" will continue INDEFINITELY. The internet wasn't built to be taken "in hand", to impose that kind of NAZI status on the global internet is pure insanity.

         

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    foozebol8085, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:18pm

    This is the answer

    This is why I run my own servers located on my own property, and the drives are mirrored and encrypted. They *WILL* need a warrant to come in, and if they take the drives, they will waste a lot of computing power to make sense of them. I administer these machines, and they are will protected digitally as well as physically.

     

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    Epicness, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 6:47pm

    So, sounds like America's fucked. Well over here in Aus we do not have CISPA or SOPA or ACTA or a bunch of self-righteous jackasses ruling our country. Ha.

     

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    CISPA equals FRAUD, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 7:48pm

    THE WORLD OF CYBER MAKE BELIEVE - TO SUPPORT U.S. GOV. CONTROL

    Dear Congressman Mike Rogers,

    What if I use an encrypted email service?
    What if a posts some related FOIA logs requests on a doc website?
    What if I post my political views on Youtube?

    Does this make me a candidate for any website to get the Green Light and send all my private E*TRADE, emails, facebook accounts to strangers to enter in an database (like N-DEx network) for thousands of more strangers to have access to, blackmail me with, commit fraud, identity theft, get privileges to issue an un-related court summons and so on, from the same database you are in-competent to say cannot be safeguard from cyber-attacks, whatever the hell that means?

    You have not even given the american people one ACTUAL ATTACK SITUATION or any threat you are claiming. Is there a REAL attack event OR NOT (?) to whatever the hell your broad CISPA bill means, other than deem anybody a threat for their private data to be made open? Are you saying Y2K was hacked to blow-up some generators? Are you saying the Aztec calendar is ready to expire could cause a cyber-attack.

    Put some real FACT in your big mouth, instead of the B.S. CYBER HOCUS POCUS coming out of it. Your bill CISPA violates the BILL OF RIGHTS! Did you go to school? People DIED for the BILL OF RIGHTS for all of us to have in the WAR OF INDEPENDENCE. Then you say “people cannot just say whatever they what on the internet”? Oh, I get it, you don't like "freedom of speech" stopping government from being corrupt and for the corporate business, so you can't get your BIG pay-off!

    I can only wish you can get you education when you’re sleeping and having a night mirror, fighting that war of independence in the middle of a battlefield, with a knife in your chest, to only wake up to meet the very people you KILLED with the CISPA bill in your hand.

    I put it to you this way again Mr. Rogers Show, if this bill passes, I can guarantee you will not need to worry about CYBER THREATS in your WORLD OF MAKE BELIEVE, because you will have millions of Americans shouting "MURRDERER" the your WORLD OF REALITY and for the rest of your life, as long as I’m around.

     

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    Kevin (profile), Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:00pm

    land of the ???

    It is sad to the country that promoted freedom for so long turn into a near dictatorial state.
    So it's "Bye bye Miss American Pie ...the day that freedom died"

     

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    Kyle, Apr 27th, 2012 @ 8:34pm

    Obama could definitely veto this dumbass law... and if he wants any votes from the online population (which makes up a majority of the United States) he had better do that. Dear lord, what has happened to the freedoms outlined in the Constitution of this country?

     

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    L. Simone Johnson, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 12:19am

    CISPA

    WE ALREADY HAVE LAWS PERTAINING CHILD ABUSE, TERRORISTS, CYBER-BULLYING, ETC. IT'S ALL BEEN COVERED BEFORE WITH LAWS THAT ARE ALREADY ON THE BOOKS. I THINK THE GOVERNMENT WANTS TO STOP THE PETITIONS THAT HAVE BEEN SO SUCCESSFUL, AND ALSO THE FREE EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION, ESPECIALLY LIES WE ARE BEING TOLD BY OUR LAWMAKERS.

     

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      metalgoddess (profile), Apr 30th, 2012 @ 11:52pm

      Re: CISPA

      That's exactly what all this nonsense is about. Sure calling it cybersecurity sounds good but what it boils down to is that if you're reading some website that provides an alternate view to all the propaganda that Fox news and their pundits put out, you can count on that website disappearing under the guise of copyright infringement. It is Internet grass roots movements that have been so successful and it is exactly what these people want to crush. That's why they hate wikileaks so much because Assange has basically laid out the truth for all to see and these creepy people hate the truth and definitely don't want others to get a hold of it. When these people didn't get their way with trying to turn the internet into nothing but corporate oriented websites, they just kept on trying and now we have CISPA. Of course in July your ISP is going to act like a good Nazi and spy on your anyway so they don't even need CISPA.

       

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    revolutionary bitch!, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 5:39am

    Elite is waging water on us! Maybe we need to burn BOHEMIAN GROVE to the ground and blow up H.A.A.R.P up! On but we can't speak truth or be subject to NDAA! Fuck U! I am going to the bush! Turning off my cell and tv. Peace Out!

     

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    Kira, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 9:51am

    CISPA

    *pulls out Death Note pages* Please write down the names of whoever supports SOPA in these pages. ((I wish it was possible to kill someone like that))

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 11:37am

    PLEASE comment on this guy's Facebook page - he is one of the co-sponsors, he has been in Congress TOO LONG and was a sponsot of SOPA too. Tell him to move over and get out of Congress!!!

    http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1043551540#!/judgecarter

     

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    James (profile), Apr 28th, 2012 @ 1:17pm

    Spread The Word

    Help spread the word about the companies that support CISPA

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 3:29pm

    "The passing into law of this bill are others like it might be the start of World War 3," that's what one of my American friends have told me and for all we know, he could very well be right.

    The US Government doesn't have the right to take away the Internet or Internet privacy OR freedom of the people. I'm Canadian and I knew right from the start when I first heard about CISPA is that it would be an international bill and become huge trouble and seeing this just proves how right I am on that thought.

    No law has the right for anyone to arrest someone just because they are against this bill. No law has the right for anyone to arrest someone just because they downloaded music or searched up something for a school project. CISPA does not have the right for us to get arrested just because we own and/or use a computer or share art, music, pictures or videos.

    I'm saying this because of what I believe and think of this and no one, not even the US Government is going to make me think otherwise. The Internet is a tool for all of us, not for some greedy, corrupted assholes we call a US Government to spy on us just because they want the power to do that and I'm willing to physically fight for that belief if it really has to come down to it.

     

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    Pro Libertate, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 7:29pm

    Nothing really changed...

    So you guys are upset, because government now tries to legalize what it has been doing since forever?

    Seriously, whenever I send anything over the internet, I assume that it is traced and read by "the enemy", whoever that may be - mostly governments.

    So if it is sensitive information, I encrypt it and if it is really, really sensitive, I wrap it in a steganography layer.

    One can add numerous other protections. The point is:

    - Assumption #1: the enemy is always trying to get any information that might be useful to them or harmful to you

    - Assumption #2: government is always the worst enemy

    - Assumption #3: there are plenty of other dangers - Mafia, Muslim terrorists, idiots who just try to wreck havoc...

    So do not post what is sensitive or private information. And if you do, protect it!

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 28th, 2012 @ 8:40pm

    The shit is Fuckin Ridiculous.!!

     

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    FM Hilton, Apr 29th, 2012 @ 4:00pm

    They don't want you to know about this

    In attempting to even look at the PDF that is linked to in the article, I've repeatedly had the browser and Adobe reader crash.

    You know what? I think they don't want anyone to know how fucked up this is, and how incredibly invasive this bill is-because if they really wanted you to know, you'd have the document available immediately without the crap.

    Don't trust the government ever to do anything right or proper. They can't, don't and won't, especially when you consider that most of them can't even read their own emails without a "expert" to show them how to do it.

    Yes, we need more security-from our own government.

     

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    Lord of the Snakes, May 1st, 2012 @ 1:20pm

    honesty willl get you arrested now.

    Make an alias, never be honest again. andy dofrain did it.

     

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    tyciol (profile), May 2nd, 2012 @ 12:27am

    A frightening expansion of powers.

     

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    balls, May 10th, 2012 @ 6:08pm

    men in there 60'S determining the fate of america FUCK YA

     

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    Cheeseman, May 18th, 2012 @ 10:28pm

    Using the line "for the children" seems to be the reason to do anything nowadays. We should use that excuse to invade Iran.

    For the children, bitches!

     

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    made4ipod, May 30th, 2012 @ 3:28pm

    Oh, government

    Silly government, when will you learn that we don't want stuff like this screwing around with our internet

     

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    jacob noel, Jul 21st, 2012 @ 6:16pm

    just wanted to leave a comment and let people know that the government is brainwashing you to think you need to let them into your business when you really don't. there are no terrorists and there is nothing to be afraid of beyond the people in our everyday life and also you should be afraid of what the government is planning against its citizens so that they can take away MORE liberties to make you feel safe! they want to control you! it may sound crazy but start to do some research. after all it's your lives being ruined. do you honestly feel safer or just more intruded on? the war on terrorism will never end, that is why the government started it, they knew all about 9/11

     

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    Yesing (profile), Sep 1st, 2012 @ 11:56am

    Just have to add that Tim Berners-Lee invented the WWW that is not the same that Internet ;)

     

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    savingsfunda, Oct 5th, 2012 @ 12:29am

    It does work some time, but not always

     

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    cvvjvh cycycccc, Oct 20th, 2012 @ 10:01am

    zgddxdfhxcxhxucgxg

    jjchcjvvxhgjt vr hdxvfcxsddew

     

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    AnonymusGamer, Feb 24th, 2013 @ 4:38pm

    As long as I can play my video games - I really don't care what's going on

    brbcounterstrike

     

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    a, Apr 22nd, 2013 @ 2:00pm

    hmm, so they CAN move quickly

    so we take 4+ months to get aid to Hurricane sandy ravaged residents, but push this through in a few weeks.

    W T F!!!

     

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    baza.vn.ua, Jul 20th, 2013 @ 4:28am

    Didn't see the link above, so here's the vote details:

    http://baza.vn.ua

    I'm proud to say my Republican rep was one of the few who voted NO on this bill... amazing. I'm glad I sent him a letter.

     

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    Imtiaz Ali, Mar 4th, 2014 @ 6:01am

    A really bad example of insanity...

     

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