Organization Overseeing Six Strikes Agreement Between Labels And ISPs Includes Advisory Board To Try To Keep Tech Folks Happy

from the better-than-nothing dept

As we get closer to the RIAA/MPAA and the major ISPs rolling out their "voluntary" six strikes agreement, turning those ISPs into Hollywood's private police force, details are finally coming out about the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), the organization that the RIAA/MPAA were setting up to manage the six strikes effort. In a move that's at least slightly surprising, and shows that they realized they couldn't completely one-side this entire thing, CCI will be run by Jill Lesser. Lesser was a managing director at The Glover Park Group (a lobbying firm), but also on the board of the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT), a group that is often on the correct side of these issues. That said, Glover Park was also one of the key lobbying firms that the MPAA used to promote SOPA.

However, lots of folks are pointing to the fact that CCI has also set up an advisory board with some familiar names of folks who have fought for consumer rights repeatedly. As Greg Sandoval reports at News.com:
CCI's advisory board will include a large number of privacy and technology advocates, including Jerry Berman, chairman of the Internet Education Foundation and founder of the Center for Democracy and Technology; Marsali Hancock, president of iKeepSafe.org; Jules Polenetsky, director of the Future of Privacy Forum; and Gigi Sohn, president and CEO of Public Knowledge.
This is, at the very least, a nod to the fact that the entertainment industry can't just completely control how this system works. Of course, it's an open question how much power this advisory board will actually have, and how much of this is really window dressing. In fact, the actual power to run CCI is in the hands of a separate "board of directors" which is entirely made up of entertainment industry and ISP representatives.

The "good news" is that many of the folks on the advisory board are certainly not at all shy about making their voices heard if they feel they're being ignored, and Public Knowledge's Gigi Sohn is not one to go away quietly on these issues. As she told Sandoval:
"It was not an easy decision for me to join this Advisory Board," Sohn said in a statement. "I did so because I saw the need to be an advocate for the rights of Internet users and to provide transparency."

Sohn said that one of the first things she wants to see once CCI is up and running is to abolish any kind of service suspension.

"I will ask at the appropriate time," Sohn said, "for the ISPs to promise not to interpret the agreement's 'temporary restriction' provision as allowing for suspension of user Internet accounts."
This whole thing will be worth watching closely, and I'm glad that at least a few good people are on the advisory board, but we'll see what happens when the actual "strikes" start issuing.

Filed Under: gigi sohn, jill lesser, six strikes
Companies: cci, center for copyright information


Reader Comments

Subscribe: RSS

View by: Time | Thread


  1. identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 3 Apr 2012 @ 8:01am

    I think that you need to understand that the current totally open internet with full on infringement at all times isn't workable for anyone. Even the "new business model" guys are starting to realize that there is a ton of money in selling content (even at low prices) that is lost to piracy.

    Economically, the current internet situation is a disaster. Anyone figure that perhaps the current depression / recession / correction / slowdown whatever you want to call it is in fact in part caused by the internet?

    You don't think?

    Consider the consolidation of wealth to companies like Google. They are sitting on a huge amount of cash, doing nothing. They are a money pit, the economy keeps shoveling money into the pit and it doesn't come back. That is money that use to be in magazine ads, radio ads, tv ads, etc... all of those businesses have shrunk. Google makes the profits, and the money doesn't get re-invested in any meaningful way.

    Consider the death of the record store, the video rental store, and the like. Replaced by automation, by piracy, and by apathy. Those jobs all disappeared, and didn't come back.

    Consider Facebook, Twitter, and the like where people spend more social time instead of having actual face to face real life social time. They don't go out for coffee, they chat online.

    I am really starting to wonder if all the "new business model" living isn't in fact what is hurting us the most.

Add Your Comment

Have a Techdirt Account? Sign in now. Want one? Register here



Subscribe to the Techdirt Daily newsletter




Comment Options:

  • Use markdown. Use plain text.
  • Remember name/email/url (set a cookie)

Follow Techdirt
Techdirt Gear
Show Now: Takedown
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Essential Reading
Techdirt Deals
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Techdirt Insider Chat
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads
Recent Stories
Advertisement
Report this ad  |  Hide Techdirt ads

Close

Email This

This feature is only available to registered users. Register or sign in to use it.