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How To Turn A Legitimate Buyer Into A Pirate In Five Easy Steps

from the ip-in-the-oatmeal dept

As we've mentioned before, it's interesting to watch copyright issues break into the mainstream and get attention from bigger and bigger sources. This time, Matthew Inman used his famous (and widely read) webcomic The Oatmeal to recount the moral quandary he was placed in when trying to watch Game of Thrones. It's hard to get the full effect without the whole comic, so you should really go read it—but here's a preview:

Of course, plenty of people have been saying this for years: the biggest driver of piracy is a lack of legitimate offerings. Unfortunately, the legacy players think (or at least claim) that they are being innovative with their offerings, even as their customers tell them otherwise. Hopefully, as people like Inman continue putting all-too-common stories like this into the spotlight, they will begin to get the message.

Filed Under: copyright, game of thrones, ip, piracy, purchases, the oatmeal


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  1. identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 20 Feb 2012 @ 9:45pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:

    "Let's stick to the story instead of attacking straw men. The story is HBO not making their content available to people who are willing to pay for it, and eventually losing these customers to piracy."

    Yes. Exactly. In order to compete in that marketplace (offering the content to make piracy a non-issue) they would have to price low enough to make obtaining it legally seem like a good option.

    But to do that, they would have to kill the exclusivity that they have granted or created for their cable / sat channel(s). So the replacing market would have to have enough money in it to make up for what is lost.

    But see, here's the rub: That exclusive market is what is driving demand. It is the promotion, it is the advertising, and it is that very exclusivity that helps to create a perception of value and demand.

    In the end, they would be specifically competing against pirates. Having to set your market price based on piracy puts the content producer at a major disadvantage. The models don't work because of it.

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