Kickstarter Becomes The Darling Of Sundance By Financing Lots Of Movies... Without Movie Studio Arrogance

from the alternatives-arise dept

We've certainly talked about the massive growth of Kickstarter, especially in the movie space, and apparently that's being noticed at famous movie festivals like Sundance. David Carr has an article at the NY Times, in which he compares Kickstarter to a movie studio but without the arrogance of a studio. And, of course, it is a very different proposition. Unlike in a studio relationship, the artist retains the ownership of the work. Unlike in a studio relationship, there's no one at Kickstarter who has to "greenlight" the picture to get it made. Instead, it's entirely tied to the ability of filmmakers to get people to pay up (in small bunches) to make it work. And it does seem to be working:
[Kickstarter] had helped finance 10 percent of the festival's slate, 17 movies in all, including four that were in competition.
And did it all without the obnoxiousness of a tradtional Hollywood studio/distributor. Of course, this really highlights a point that we've been making for over a decade. While some traditionalists with little vision have spent the last decade screaming about how there are no new business models for producing content, it's become increasingly clear that where there's a need, such services and business models will get created. And, even better, they seem to be ones set up in a way where the artist has more choice and more control.

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  1. icon
    Gwiz (profile), 2 Feb 2012 @ 8:32am

    Re: Re: Art vs Profit

    "Why yes, I am a 'true artist". Now, can I take your order please?"

    Wow. What a condescending thing to say. Consider this:

    "Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write. This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple "I must", then build your life in accordance with this necessity; your whole life, even into its humblest and most indifferent hour, must become a sign and witness to this impulse."

    This is Rainer Maria Rilke's advice to a young poet named Franz Kappus in 1903. This has been paraphrased by Whoopi Goldberg in Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit as:

    "I went to my mother who gave me this book called Letters To A Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke. Heís a fabulous writer. A fellow used to write to him and say: "I want to be a writer. Please read my stuff." And Rilke says to this guy: "Donít ask me about being a writer. lf, when you wake up in the morning, you can think of nothing but writing then youíre a writer."

    If, when you wake up in the morning, you can think of nothing but piles of money then you should become an accountant.

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