Studies

by Mike Masnick


Filed Under:
availability, infringement, prices



High Prices, Lack Of Availability Driving Lots Of Infringement

from the well,-duh dept

As we've seen before, if you make authorized content available in a convenient and useful manner, it can really help minimize infringement. Of course, if you don't make it available, or if you price it wrong, it just makes the problem worse. A new report out of the UK took a look at the availability and price online of some top films and found that the movie industry isn't doing a very good job, likely leading to much greater infringement.
DVDs are available for just shy of 100% of the films. But a wealth of British cultural history is simply not available through legal providers. Only 43% of the top 50 British films can be bought or rented online. Similarly, only 58% of the BAFTA Best Film award winners since 1960 have been made available.

The situation looks worse if iTunes is discounted. Excluding iTunes, only 27% of the BAFTA award winners are available, with 29% of the best British films. Only 6% of the best 50 British films are on Film4 OD or Virgin Media, with 14% available through a LoveFilm subscription and 4% through pay per view on LoveFilm.
The industry wants so badly to blame infringement for many of its structural problems. But, perhaps if it just focused on making the content available in a convenient fashion at a reasonable price, they'd realize that it really was just a business model issue all along and had nothing to do with "piracy."

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  1. icon
    Jay (profile), 26 Oct 2011 @ 12:07pm

    Re: Re: Re: Re:

    *sigh*

    Pay attention to this. Every time you have any evidence that copyright is doing more harm than any good, some paid shill is going to come around to knock you down.

    No corroborating evidence of how copyright is actually doing well, merely anecdotal evidence that says someone is being hurt by infringement. Then when you show how infringement in the realm of music leads to new music, refuting their claims, they attack you.

    Oh look, Gog.com takes away IP checks, so people in Australia have a choice in a price less than $100 AUSD. WOW! Valve doesn't care about piracy, and makes more money per employee than Apple or Facebook.

    And yet, here we go with the old codger of piracy killing the US market, when it's been proven that the younger artists and directors have found their own methods to success.

    No, I'm inundated with mentions of how piracy is illegal, when the law enforcement agents that follow the law have to make massive stretches to do what they do. I'm told that my argument is invalid because proof of actual harm in the copyright wars is hard to come by.

    When you have the NFL, ICE, and Monster going after their competitors instead of offering better products or actually following the Fifth Amendment.

    Mark well what this AC does. He shoots the messenger because his argument otherwise has no validity. He can't prove the harm of piracy, which I believe to be just a lack of legal channels. He can't prove that all of this legal wrangling isn't just regulatory capture. Finally, the AC can't dispute the article above. He takes the fact that I link to Mike's older articles as a sign that I can't prove the same stuff with the power of Google.

    Well, I just did. Do you actually have an argument, or should I take your poor choice in debate tactics as a sign of weakness on your part?

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