DailyDirt: Old, Old Wine, Goes To My Head...

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

It's actually pretty easy to fool tastebuds when it comes to aged wine -- a more expensive-looking bottle or just a good story is sometimes enough to make people think a wine tastes better than it does. No one trusts wine that comes out of a plastic spigot on a box, but if you tell people you've gone to extraordinary lengths to store wine for years, some folks are willing to cough up thousands of dollars for the chance to drink it. If you're a knowledgeable wine drinker with a lot of disposable income, check out a few of these aged wines. After you've finished checking out those links, take a look at our Daily Deals for cool gadgets and other awesome stuff.

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  • identicon
    Martin, 21 Apr 2016 @ 6:12pm

    Wine aged at sea

    I have read (according to cheese makers in Quebec, Canada) that cheese aged deep under water tastes better than the same cheese aged on dry land. Sorry, I don't have a reference -- it was years ago.

    Love your site. Keep up the good word!
    ... Martin Potter

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    Aaron Walkhouse (profile), 22 Apr 2016 @ 3:48am

    Hmmm…

    Maybe it's the pressure…
    …after all, the water is being kept out by the containers…

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 22 Apr 2016 @ 8:52am

      Re: Hmmm…

      more likely the low and steady temperature, and eliminated air exchange.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • identicon
        Anomynuos Crowad, 22 Apr 2016 @ 9:53am

        Re: Re: Hmmm…

        Could also be something to do with light filtration. Down that deep, the light spectrum is restricted.

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

        • icon
          Aaron Walkhouse (profile), 22 Apr 2016 @ 1:33pm

          It's totally blocked by those depths and by barrels anyway,
          but external pressure raises internal pressure by tightening
          a barrel and reducing normal outgassing.

          With bottles the cork is pushed in until pressure equalizes,
          which is not far due to the small air space; but creates a
          large amount of additional pressure.

          So, pressure applies to both types of container.

          Reduced temperatures at depth may be a factor but is probably
          less significant than pressure; the unique factor.

          reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

          • icon
            Ninja (profile), 25 Apr 2016 @ 8:32am

            Re:

            Some places have pretty controlled temperature so I tend to agree that it isn't really an issue. I'd go for pressure and lack of air or rather oxygen. At great depths much less dissolved oxygen is there to promote oxidation. Even if the barrels are technically sealed some air always find its way in through the pores and inner veins. Remember that wood was originally a tree with a series of little vases (pipes if you will) so I'm going with that too. Remember even in sealed bottles of soft drink the gas inside eventually finds its way out.

            Still, all environments could be artificially simulated for each separated component to see which one influences the process the most.

            reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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