Be Your Own Souvenir

from the 3d-printing dept

We've been interested in the potential legal implications of 3D printing for a while, but that shouldn't blind us to the fact that some of the natural uses of 3D printing can be pretty cool as well. There's something really remarkable about this new project, from blablabLAB, posted on Notcot, about the idea of being your own souvenir. Rather than just getting a little plastic trinket from a souvenir stand, you can pose yourself however you want, get a 3D scan, and then a 3D printing of yourself. There's a photo below and then a pretty cool video of the process in action.

Image courtesy of Notcot

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Filed Under: 3d printing, souvenir


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  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 26 Apr 2011 @ 9:10pm

    I need to hurry up and run to the USPTO and get a patent on this idea before someone else does. You can't blame me, I'm only doing it to avoid getting sued in the future and to potentially counter sue anyone who does sue me for anything.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Anonymous Coward, 26 Apr 2011 @ 9:27pm

    This reminds me of those etchings within a block of glass you can get in touristy destinations. Spouse and I got ours at Madam Tussaud's Wax Museum in NYC for our 15th anniversary. It's a cool memento. I'd do this 3D printing thing too. Maybe for our 25th! :)

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    cc (profile), 26 Apr 2011 @ 10:35pm

    It's using hacked Kinects for the scanning and an open source 3d printer for the printing. Pretty neat stuff.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Mechanical Engineer, 26 Apr 2011 @ 10:38pm

    While 3d printing has a number of good attributes, there are a few downsides to 3d printing.

    The ABS thread cartridges the printers use work out to costing about $5 per cubic inch of material or dissolvable support material.

    Also, 3d printers have a large difference in resolution between the x-y plane and the z axis, which causes the stepping artifact you can see in the pictures above.

    The mechanical properties of a 3d-printed part are often not very good because of the striated pattern caused by the rastering motion of the printer head. This means that parts can't take impacts, high stresses, or high rotational speeds. The material is also prone to material creep.

    The printer sometimes needs pause to allow a layer to cool or to clean the printing head before printing the next layer.

    3d printing is a good technology. It's very useful for visualization purposes, real-size part placeholders, and novelty applications like this souvenir gimmick. Unfortunately, 3d printing also has its limitations. It would be overstating the technology to believe it will be anywhere near the star trek style replicators that people envision it as, at least in the near future.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      Tom Landry (profile), 27 Apr 2011 @ 5:20am

      Re:

      One thing it most definitely has done is changed the industrial design field. Prototyping is now so much more flexible and economical due to this technology.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Ethan, 27 Apr 2011 @ 6:20am

      Re: Cheaper than you think

      The price you quote is true for professional-grade FFD (Fused Filament Deposition) 3D printers, but perhaps you don't recognize the printer in the article - it's a Bits from Bytes RapMan, a descendant of the original RepRap Darwin model. The 3mm ABS filament used by it and other ~$1000 3D printers costs about $10-$15/lb (around $0.50/cubic inch), and large parts are frequently only filled to 20%-30% inside of solid shells.

      As for the mechanical properties of printed parts, RepRap models Darwin and Mendel can print the majority of the non-threaded parts to make another Darwin or Mendel, and I'm not aware of any reports of mechanical failure of these printed printer parts. There's even a Mendel variant that can produce all the printed parts in one 8"x8" print run. It's true that FFD parts are not as strong as machining the same shape out of a solid block, but rarely does that present a problem; It's more of an aesthetic issue.

      To learn more about affordable 3D printing you can do at home, google for 'reprap' or 'makerbot', or look for a user group near you.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

      • icon
        chris (profile), 28 Apr 2011 @ 11:04am

        Re: Re: Cheaper than you think

        As for the mechanical properties of printed parts, RepRap models Darwin and Mendel can print the majority of the non-threaded parts to make another Darwin or Mendel, and I'm not aware of any reports of mechanical failure of these printed printer parts.

        the only reprap parts you can print are the joints. most of the structure is metal thread rod, and the actual work is done with micro-controllers, stepper motors, and stepper motor driver boards, all of which you can't print.

        you can read about our hackerspace's mendel adventure here:
        http://wiki.hive13.org/Mendel

        reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      SafeCycle.Net, 27 Apr 2011 @ 9:42pm

      Re: 3d printer cartridges

      I had this very same query to another 3d resourcing company (pokono?) It seems to me the process of "engineering" , and packaging the micro solids and the chemical & power requirements to do so could not be called remotely sustainable..

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • icon
      chris (profile), 28 Apr 2011 @ 11:34am

      Re:

      The ABS thread cartridges the printers use work out to costing about $5 per cubic inch of material or dissolvable support material.

      yeah, and intricate parts can also take several hours to print. oh, and with the desktop size of the makerbot or the mendel, you are limited to parts that are less than a cubic foot in size. also the ABS that repraps and makerbots use (it looks like weed eater cord) is about $10 per pound.

      but even a 12 hour wait for a tiny, goopy gear made from what is basically melted lego is vastly cheaper and easier than waiting for 1000 parts to be injection molded and shipped from china, especially if you aren't done prototyping.

      The mechanical properties of a 3d-printed part are often not very good because of the striated pattern caused by the rastering motion of the printer head. This means that parts can't take impacts, high stresses, or high rotational speeds. The material is also prone to material creep.

      also true, but the purpose of a 3'd printer isn't always to make production parts, but to make one-off prototypes.

      once your part is designed you can move up to a different (even slower, even more expensive) one-off prototyping process, like sand casting or CNC milling so you can make your part from aluminum or another metal, or laser cut it from a sheet of plastic, wood or metal.

      3d printing is just one part of the desktop rapid prototyping stack. desktop sized CNCs and desktop laser cutters are also out there.

      runs of a million widgets in a fully automated mega-factory will be always be cheaper on a per widget basis, but that's a very 20th century way to approach things.

      the future is really uncertain from a supply chain standpoint. fuel pricing and natural disasters mean that making millions of widgets in one place and shipping them all over the globe could be a risky and/or expensive proposition.

      look at how earthquakes in asia have affected the markets for electronics over the years.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Pixelation, 26 Apr 2011 @ 10:41pm

    All well and fine but i hold the copyright to my image. This will obviously infringe. What a horrible tragedy when it comes to my rights.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    R, 26 Apr 2011 @ 11:52pm

    This is eerily reminiscent of Cory Doctorow's Makers.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Alatar, 27 Apr 2011 @ 2:40am

    Maybe, to gain people's sympathy, the TSA could offer you a naked souvenir of yourself after each scan.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    tech84 (profile), 27 Apr 2011 @ 2:56am

    cool!

    Nice concept, but the souvenirs kinda looked like miniaturized terracotta army. lol

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Anonymous Coward, 27 Apr 2011 @ 7:31am

      Re: Fusili Jerry!

      Or those uncooked pasta sculptures Kramer made on Seinfeld.

      I guess it's the color, reminds me of pasta...or I need lunch.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Rekrul, 27 Apr 2011 @ 6:39am

    So before they take the scan, they mummify the person in Saran Wrap? Kinky...

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • identicon
    Souvenir pernikahan, 17 Jan 2015 @ 11:07pm

    Souvenir pernikahan

    great.im so interested.i have read bout digital printing.but i like better manual art printing.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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