US Copyright Group Says ISPs Who Don't Cough Up User Names May Be Guilty Of Inducing Copyright Infringement

from the uh,-good-luck-with-that-one... dept

Thomas Dunlap, the lawyer who set up US Copyright Group, which mimics European operations like ACS:Law in threatening to sue tens of thousands of people on flimsy evidence in mass automated lawsuits for alleged copyright infringement if they don't pay up, sure has some interesting legal theories. We had already noted that at least Time Warner Cable was fighting the subpoenas, and in Dunlap's response, he's claiming that ISPs that don't just roll over and hand over the info open themselves up to charges of contributory copyright infringement under the Grokster standard put forth by the Supreme Court.

I can't see how anyone could possibly find Time Warner guilty of inducement for not handing over subscriber info -- especially not under the standards in the Grokster ruling. Those include that the company had to promote that its service could be used for infringement, that they failed to filter out those infringing uses when possible and that the business plan depended on a high volume of infringement. I don't see any of those three things applying to Time Warner and not handing over customer info on subpoenas. This seems like more bluster from Dunlap to try to get Time Warner Cable to just given in and hand over the names, so he can send out letters demanding payment.

Filed Under: automated lawsuits, copyright, inducement
Companies: time warner cable, us copyright group


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  1. icon
    btr1701 (profile), 26 May 2010 @ 11:49am

    Re: Legal

    > how about "go ahead and infringe, we will cover for
    > you and never give your name up

    If they said any such thing you might actually have a point. As they haven't, you don't.

    Not only that, if they *did* comply with the requests from this collection group without subpoena, they'd be in massive breach of contract, since every ISP user agreement I've ever seen binds them contractually to protect the customer's privacy unless ordered to turn over the information by a court.

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