DailyDirt: Let's Play Global Thermonuclear War

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

Artificial intelligence projects are getting better and better at playing games against humans. Pretty soon, we'll just let computers play games for us -- because they'll be better at them. Here are just a few more interesting links on AI research playing with games. By the way, StumbleUpon can recommend some good Techdirt articles, too.


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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 11th, 2012 @ 6:13pm

    ok... so really really hard crossword puzzles are on the way..

    i can't imagine how hard crossword puzzles need to get for humans to stay ahead of software. yikes

     

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      Torg (profile), Apr 11th, 2012 @ 7:27pm

      Re: ok... so really really hard crossword puzzles are on the way..

      The computer has problems with puns and other forms of wordplay. It got hung up on a few of those during the competition.

       

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    Chronno S. Trigger (profile), Apr 11th, 2012 @ 7:15pm

    A strainge game.

    The only winning move is not to play.

    How about a nice game of chess?

     

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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 12th, 2012 @ 7:14am

    to "say" something implies "intent." But a computer program cannot--by definition--have any intent. So it makes nonsense of the verb "to say" to say, assert, contend, that a computer program could say "I'll be back."--even more absurd and hilarious is the assertion that the program "said" this "bluntly".

    What, please, precisely distinguishes a computer program's "saying" something "bluntly" as opposed to just saying it without any aspect of bluntness? In other words, that which cannot even "say"--by word or deed-- may not be "blunt" since being blunt, too, implies intent.

    At this rate, when computers "tell us" that they are "smarter" than we (humans) are, apparently "we'll" believe "them".

    I ask: are "we" capable of asking (and recognizing): "How STUPID is that?!"

     

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    proximity1, Apr 12th, 2012 @ 7:15am

    the above (and the copy below) posted by "proximity1"


    to "say" something implies "intent." But a computer program cannot--by definition--have any intent. So it makes nonsense of the verb "to say" to say, assert, contend, that a computer program could say "I'll be back."--even more absurd and hilarious is the assertion that the program "said" this "bluntly".

    What, please, precisely distinguishes a computer program's "saying" something "bluntly" as opposed to just saying it without any aspect of bluntness? In other words, that which cannot even "say"--by word or deed-- may not be "blunt" since being blunt, too, implies intent.

    At this rate, when computers "tell us" that they are "smarter" than we (humans) are, apparently "we'll" believe "them".

    I ask: are "we" capable of asking (and recognizing): "How STUPID is that?!"

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

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    mikey4001, Apr 12th, 2012 @ 2:42pm

    So, who decided it was a good idea to educate the ancestors of Skynet by having them play Civilization? This is now an artificial intelligence whose sense of self and understanding of the world and has been created within the confines of a global domination simulator. What could possibly go wrong...?

     

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    eric clayton, Feb 5th, 2014 @ 10:04pm

    war

    i think nucular war should not be thought of being used since it risk the anilalation of the whole human race we must learn to love one another through commication and understanding

     

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