DailyDirt: Dangerous Playgrounds Are Fun!

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

If you have young kids, you might have noticed that public playgrounds are a bit different than the ones you played on as a kid. Rubberized surfaces have replaced gravel or asphalt, and simple teeter-totters (or see-saws) have been re-designed using viscoelastic materials to prevent dangerous accelerations. You might have noticed it's hard to find monkey bars on playgrounds. The reasons for these changes are obvious: safety and liability. However, are kids still having as much fun outdoors? Here are just a few links on playground equipment. If you'd like to read more awesome and interesting stuff, check out this unrelated (but not entirely random!) Techdirt post via StumbleUpon.

Reader Comments (rss)

(Flattened / Threaded)

  1.  
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    John, Mar 31st, 2014 @ 7:16pm

    Tough New Zealand kids

    I recently holidayed on the south island of New Zealand. Not only is it a stunningly beautiful place, all the play grounds have 1 to 1.5cm loose rocks for the kids to fall on, under the playground equipment.

    No wonder NZ rugby team as so good.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  2.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Mar 31st, 2014 @ 7:31pm

    This trend started when I was young enough to hang out on playgrounds. I knew what they were doing then and why, and I hated them for tearing down the equipment I loved and replacing with useless, safety certified crap that wouldn't amuse a five year old. I've never understood why states don't pass laws to limit liability in these situations.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  3.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Mar 31st, 2014 @ 8:12pm

    not the reason

    Parents don't slide with kids for increased safety. They slide with kids who are to scared to slide alone.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  4.  
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    zip, Mar 31st, 2014 @ 9:25pm

    grist-mill-in-disguise

    The most insidiously dangerous of the "classic" playground equipment had to be the merry-go-round, a heavy steel structure designed so that small children who fell off would get trapped underneath and ground up like hamburger meat.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  5.  
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    Anonymous Coward, Apr 1st, 2014 @ 7:17am

    Battle scars all kids have them , embrace them .. because remembering that time when you hit the curb on your bike and brush burned your left leg, flipped over the handlebars and went home with blood running down your leg and gravel and dirt embedded in the wound .. those days are meant to remind you of a childhood that was both fun and daring.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  6.  
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    nasch (profile), Apr 1st, 2014 @ 6:57pm

    The first article is long and very worth reading, I recommend it if you haven't read it. I haven't checked out the other two yet.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  7.  
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    Gwiz (profile), Apr 2nd, 2014 @ 6:45am

    Re: grist-mill-in-disguise

    I always liked the eroded and exposed hunks of concrete sticking up around the legs of all the playground equipment in my day. They added a dangerous element to everything.

    Man, those were the days back then, when we used to let Natural Selection do it's thing to improve humankind.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]

  8.  
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    nasch (profile), Apr 2nd, 2014 @ 7:58am

    Re: Re: grist-mill-in-disguise

    Man, those were the days back then, when we used to let Natural Selection do it's thing to improve humankind.

    Natural selection always does its thing, only the nature of the pressures changes.

     

    reply to this | link to this | view in thread ]


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