Should YouTube Allow Artful Nudity?

from the but-think-of-the-commenters... dept

The EFF and the National Coalition Against Censorship are apparently asking YouTube to consider changing its policy with regards to nudity. Apparently, it will allow nudity if the video is from a film or TV show -- but not if it's user generated videos made for YouTube. Separately, YouTube suggests it will allow nudity with "some educational, documentary and scientific content, but only if that is the sole purpose of the video and it is not gratuitously graphic." The problem, according to the EFF and NCAC, is that there is no exception for work that is artistic in nature, and apparently YouTube recently removed the videos of a well-known artist, Amy Greenfield, for violating the "no nudity" policy. Now, this isn't actually a "censorship" issue, since YouTube is a private site, and not the government. So, honestly, I don't see any problem with YouTube deciding that it doesn't want that particular content on its site, but there is a separate issue raised here -- which is that, once again, the real issue is Google's lack of customer service -- something we've seen a lot of lately. One of the complaints is that Greenfield's videos were taken down with no recourse and no method for her to communicate with folks at YouTube to talk about getting them back online.

Filed Under: nudity, video, youtube
Companies: eff, google, ncac


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  1. icon
    R. Miles (profile), 25 Feb 2010 @ 3:37am

    Objection!

    "...but there is a separate issue raised here -- which is that, once again, the real issue is Google's lack of customer service..."
    Give people an inch, and they'll soon demand a mile.

    This is exactly what's happening here given this idiot named Amy Greenfield decided on her own accord to change the services she saw fit.

    I don't believe Google, who gives people plenty of leeway to upload some rather ridiculous things, should be punished (or thought of doing so to its customers) for implementing a few restrictions, one of which being nudity.

    Those who challenge "nudity is art" are the same that will turn around ten seconds later and scream "child pornography!" if the same approach is taken to children.

    Google has every right to stand by this decision not to open up this can of worms, while trying to give people the choice to determine what's art, and what's pornography.

    If people are that damn desperate for seeing nudity, the internet is more than sufficient to meet their desires.

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