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Connecting With Fans Is An Ongoing Process: Do Something Small Weekly, Big Monthly

from the one-mantra dept

I've been meaning to write about Topspin CEO Ian Rogers' "moonlighting" foray into managing the band Get Busy Committee. Given Ian's close involvement with new music business models, it's no surprise that he's been doing a lot of interesting things, from selling uzi-shaped USB keys with the album (the album is called "Uzi Does It") to using Kickstarter to fund a vinyl picture disc -- including an offer for $1,000 to have the band write a song about the buyer, which would go on the release. It turns out that option sold out in a day (though it looks like some of the other options are still a bit short on buyers).

What's really great, though, is that Ian is revealing as much of the process as he has time for in semi-regular blog posts. Recently, he explained part of the general thinking that he's been pushing on the band, that they should: "Do Something Small Weekly, Something Big Monthly." The specific implementation doesn't fit for all content creators (or even all musicians), but the concept is a good one. It's a recognition that the old way a content creator related with fans was through major one-off "releases" (new album, new book, new concert, etc.). But times have changed, and the way you connect with fans is an ongoing process, and like it or not (and plenty don't like it), there is a sense of "what have you done for me lately." But if you're going to thrive in that sort of world, you have to keep doing stuff and keep experimenting. Setting a specific pace (something small weekly, something big monthly) is quite a useful way for many to think about this sort of experimentation in small, easy to comprehend and implement steps.

Filed Under: business models, connecting with fans, get busy committee, ian rogers, music


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  1. icon
    Suzanne Lainson (profile), 21 Feb 2010 @ 4:46pm

    Re: Re: not sure about the connect with fans bit

    But there's no reason to dismiss a model because it might not work for everyone.

    I don't think he was dismissing it, just suggesting that all this interactivity requires a certain set of skills and not all musicians have them.

    The usual response is to suggest that that musicians find others to help them market and handle fan management. But unless you have some devoted fans who will do it for free and are good at it, you either need to hire someone (who can be expensive) or you need to agree to hand over a percentage of your income to him or her (much the way you would to a manager).

    The fall of the label system has changed the dynamics, but there are new challenges with what is replacing it. The direct-to-fan model is time-consuming, and also is running up against an economic recession that leaves fans with less money to spend. If all they want is the music, fans can find it for free. Money that used to go into buy CDs can now go into devices and connectivity.

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