DailyDirt: Staying In Space Isn't Healthy...

from the urls-we-dig-up dept

Getting into a metal can bolted to a rocket is inherently dangerous. And even after you've escaped the full force of the Earth's pull, you're still not safe floating around in microgravity. There's radiation and the obvious nothingness that'll kill you in a few minutes if you're exposed to the vacuum of space. Assuming you're protected in a nice shielded spacecraft with plenty of food/water/air, you can spend months up there, but then you'll have problems getting back to terra firma. Survive the landing, and you may find out that your muscles have atrophied substantially. Here are just a few more links to possible challenges with manned space explorations. If you'd like to read more awesome and interesting stuff, check out this unrelated (but not entirely random!) Techdirt post via StumbleUpon.
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Filed Under: astronauts, drosophila, health, human spaceflight, infection, jellyfish, manned space exploration, microgravity, space


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  • identicon
    Anonymous, 6 Feb 2014 @ 5:30pm

    "You may leave here for 4 days in space, but when you return it's the same old place."
    -Barry McGuire

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

  • icon
    DNY (profile), 7 Feb 2014 @ 10:25am

    Orbit vs. Space

    So the upshot of this is that one really needs to replace gravity either with centrifugal force (the big rotating space station model beloved of 1950's to
    1970's sci-fi) or constant acceleration to the midpoint of the journey, then constant acceleration in the opposite direction on the second half.

    reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]

    • identicon
      Lawrence D'Oliveiro, 7 Feb 2014 @ 3:00pm

      Re: Orbit vs. Space

      I think the problem with spinning parts is the weight, complexity, cost, maneouvring difficulties etc.

      Constant acceleration/deceleration may indeed become practical, with ion propulsion, VASIMR and so on. But I don’t think the current designs can give anything close to 1G.

      reply to this | link to this | view in chronology ]


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